Winterfest Photofest

Welcome to the last day of our Winterfest Photofest. I know you’ll enjoy this last set of pictures that all have a quiet, contemplative quality.

 

First, more delicious photos by Dan Cates, who was introduced to us yesterday. I think Dan’s photos have a lovely, tranquil feel to them, and this grouping is no exception.

©Don Cates, all rights reserved.

©Don Cates, all rights reserved.

©Don Cates, all rights reserved.

©Don Cates, all rights reserved.

©Don Cates, all rights reserved.

©Don Cates, all rights reserved.

©Don Cates, all rights reserved.

©Don Cates, all rights reserved.

©Don Cates, all rights reserved.

©Don Cates, all rights reserved.

 

Next, two evocative and moody photos from the camera of Marcus Ranum (Stderr)

Fall ice in the yard ©Marcus Ranum, all rights reserved.

Ice on the pond ©Marcus Ranum, all rights reserved

 

Finally, a serene and perfectly titled photo from JacqueG.

Ice Candles©JacqueG, all rights reserved.

I’d like to thank everyone who submitted photos and made Winterfest such a success. I’d also like to thank everyone who made donations to our Winterfest fundraising campaign. If you haven’t done that yet and would like to contribute, you can do so here.

I’d also like to remind everyone that Affinity loves getting photo submissions any time of the year, so if you have any photos you’d like to share, please feel free to send them in. Our address is always in the left sidebar, underneath the colourful percolating head.

 

Join Jack and voyager for a walk in the woods.

This is my first attempt at making a video, and it shows. The Pace is slow, it’s a bit rough in places and there’s some wind noise in the background that I couldn’t get rid of. It’s been a pretty steep learning curve for me, and I’ve barely scratched the surface. I had planned to add a bit of music, but I couldn’t find anything that I liked better than the sound of rustling leaves, so the soundtrack is just us walking with a bit of commentary from me. I had also hoped to end the video with Jack and I singing, but Jack’s been under the weather and hasn’t been in the mood to make music. He is slowly improving, though, so perhaps next month we’ll make another short movie full of raucous, rollicking fun.

I hope you can get a sense of how much both Jack and I enjoy walking in the woods.

 

 

Winterfest Photofest

Welcome! Today we have 2 submissions that are all about looking at things close up, including a few birds and a wannabe bird at the end who will make you smile. Let’s go take a look.

First, a well-captured, tall bird with beautiful amber eyes from Pieter L. Harreman.  It reminds me of the heron who lives in or park, but the white hghlights of this bird make him look more dapper and elegant.

©Pieter L. Harreman, all rights reserved.

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Next, a set of photos full of pattern and texture from the camera of Dan Cates. (you’ll be seeing more of Dan’s photos tomorrow on our Winterfest wrap-up)

©Don Cates, all rights reserved.A

©Don Cates, all rights reserved.

©Don Cates, all rights reserved.

©Don Cates, all rights reserved.

©Don Cates, all rights reserved.

©Don Cates, all rights reserved.

©Don Cates, all rights reserved.

©

©Don Cates, all rights reserved.

Thanks to you both for taking the time to send these photos in. They all make wonderful additions to our Winterfest collection.

 

 

 

 

 

Winterfest Photofest

Welcome back. The first set of photos today is wildly creative and comes from the mind and camera of Avalus. I’ll let him explain,

I don’t have a Christmas tree at home, but in the lab, a reaction I did today provided a splendid alternative. Here are some glittery fotos. Below them, I will go a bit into the details of what you see there. 

©Avalus, all rights reserved.

©Avalus, all rights reserved.

©Avalus, all rights reserved.

These shiny metal balls are beads of molten potassium sitting on top and inside of a potassium alcoholate/alcohol compound (the white crystalline, snowlike stuff) that slowly dissolves into the boiling hexane.

What happens here is that the potassium replaces the hydrogen of the OH group of the alcohol, forming a potassium-alcoholate and gaseous hydrogen, so the metal will slowly disappear over the next few days. In the end, the resulting potassium alcoholate will be liquid at room temperature, which is pretty cool, because most alcoholates are solids with high melting points.

This stuff will be used in my PhD research of weird alkalimetal organic complexes.

©Avalus, all rights reserved.

An accidental self-portrait on a liquid metal surface, warped by passing of hexane, running down the walls of the vessel.

Have a good (and maybe science-y) holiday season, everybody!

 

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The next set of photos today are all about texture and pattern, and they come from the camera of our own Charly.

©Charly, all rights reserved

©Charly, all rights reserved

©Charly, all rights reserved

 

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Lastly is a compelling group of landscape photos sent in by Peter Lindsay. Peter lives in southwestern Manitoba (Canada) and tells us that the landscape there is quite unique. Peter does photography in every season but notes that winter is a favourite time of year. They also tell us that they’re fond of loan trees, which I’m sure you’ll note in these stunning pictures. Peter has sent us a link to their pubic Flickr site, which I encourage you to check out. The collection is brimming with delicious landscapes from around the world that are well worth seeing.

Dec. 1, 2020, ©Peter Lindsay, all rights reserved.

Dec. 2, 2018, ©Peter Lindsay, all rights reserved.

Dec. 22, 2018,. ©Peter Lindsay, all rights reserved.

Dec. 25, 2019, ©Peter Lindsay, all rights reserved.

Thanks to all three of you for sending in these photos.

 

 

Winterfest Photofest

Today’s photographs all speak to the blanketing beauty of fresh snow.

First, we have a tranquil snow scene sent in by Kelvin L. Woelk.

©Kelvin L. Woelk, all rights reserved

 

Next, some a few shots of this year’s first snowfall from our very own Charly.

©Charly, all rights reserved

©Charly, all rights reserved

 

Finally, some quiet landscape shots full of pattern, taken in central or west-central Minnesota by Mark Hesse.

The one titled Hoarfrost was taken in Morris, MN, home of FTB’s own PZ Myers.”

Ice Houses ©Mark Hesse, all rights reserved

Hoarfrost,©Mark Hesse, all rights reserved

Ornaments,©Mark Hesse, all rights reserved

Big Stone,©Mark Hesse, all rights reserved

Thanks for taking the time to send in your photos.

 

 

Winterfest Photofest

We’ve been getting lots of submissions, so I have a few photos to share with you today.

First, two fascinating photos sent in by Sheila Crosby who tell us,

Just to be a bit different.
INTSnow is the Isaac Newton Telescope  To the best of my knowledge it’s the biggest telescope that’s ever been moved. It opened on the south coast of England in 1968, then they shut it down in 1979 and moved it to La Palma in the Canary Islands where it reopened in 1983. It’s my favourite telescope because I met my husband in the control room there.
WHTsnow is the William Herschel telescope. When I worked there it was the biggest in Europe, with a main mirror 13ft in diameter. Now it’s dwarfed by S¡Gran Telescopio Canarias, but I don’t think I have a snowy photo of that. one.
The observatory is only 28 Âş north of the equator, and the Canary Islands are a winter sun destination for much of Europe, but the observatory is at almost 8,000ft, so snow is fairly common in winter – less than it was 30 years ago though.
Sheila also has an interesting website, La Palma Island, that’s full of information about astronomy and the island itself. If you have a chance I encourage you to check it out.

INTSnow, ©Sheila Crosby, all rights reserved.

WHTSnow, ©Sheila Crosby, all rights reserved.

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Next, a beautiful home with a long driveway that speaks to the demands of winter from Suzanne Willis.

©Suzanne Willis, all rights reserved.

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Finally, we have a beautiful and engaging photo from Todd R. I love the look of wonder on the dog’s face.

Corgi in the Snow,©Todd R.

Thanks to everyone who has sent in photos. We’ll be seeing them all over the next few days, and there is still time to send us your submission to affinitysubmissions@gmail.com. The address is always on the left sidebar underneath the colourful, percolating head.

 

It’s almost Winterfest and we want your photos

Ugh! ©voyager, all rights reserved.

©

The Freethought Blogs Winterfest is coming up on Saturday, December 5th, and we have all sorts of good things planned to entertain you. For the full schedule of events, you can click here or on the Winterfest logo at the top of the left sidebar on any of our blogs here at FtB. The schedule is still being finalized, so be sure to check back often to see what’s up and when, but there are lots of good things being planned. Here at Affinity, we’re hosting a Winterfest Photofest beginning Monday, November 30th, and we’d like to add your photos to the collection. You can submit your pictures to affinitysubmissions@gmail.com and please let me know what name or nym you’d like them credited to. That address is permanently in our left sidebar underneath the colourful, percolating head, and if you click that link, it will open up an email form for you to conveniently use.

Why do we do all of this? That’s easy; it’s because we love you. Also, we’re celebrating an important anniversary. It was one year ago that we celebrated our legal victory over Dr. Snowflake, Richard Carrier. We’re still digging out from under the legal bills of that mess, and we would greatly appreciate any support you’re able to provide. You can donate directly to our Paypal account here or with a credit card here. I know this is a tough time of year for many folks (especially in 2020), so an appreciative audience is also plenty of support. Please tune in and let us entertain you.