39. » « Alive.

Plastic Bottle Village.


static1-squarespace-com

This is one of the coolest, best things I have ever seen. Visit the site, settle in, do some reading, it’s…it’s awesome. Great. Amazing.

1a

1b

Plastic Bottle Village.

39. » « Alive.

Comments

  1. Ice Swimmer says

    This is way cool.

    Another way to keep the environment fairly clean from bottles and cans is the deposit system. Here, it’s 10 -- 40 cent/bottle or can. This encourages people to return the empty containers to the store. In the case of extended outdoors boozing during free concerts and public holidays, some people* are treating the discarded bottles and cans as a way to make money. Also, I’ve known newspaper deliverers in areas where a lot of people pass through in the weekend nights making money from this.

    __
    * = Some of them do it out of necessity, e.g. the Romanian and Bulgarian Romany people transported here to beg and homeless alcoholics.

  2. Ice Swimmer says

    And yes, different solutions are feasible in different circumstances, it’s not like one size fits all.

  3. rq says

    This sounds like a great project for the type of climate they’re actually building it in. It probably needs several tweaks to work nearer the Arctic circle, but all that takes is a bit of thought and ingenuity, and a few more years of global warming.
    But anyway. :) Kudos for starting something like this; I just hope they have everything else in place to be ecologically friendly to the jungle (I mean, people will be living there, that has an effect and an impact, and I hope they’ve worked out how that will work, too).

  4. quotetheunquote says

    Load and loads of air-filled polystyrene -- holy firetrap, Batman!

    Traditional materials -- native woods, palm thatch -- are also flammable, of course, but I believe they have a higher combustion threshold. That is, being denser, they dissipate hear better, making it harder to create a self-sustaining flame.

    The guy’s right about one thing, though -- plastic in the environment is a big problem. What I’m in favour of, instead of re-use, or even recycling, is a whole lot more regulation to discourage the use of non-biodegradable materials. (E.g., how about taxing the bottlers $0.10 on every 250mL bottle they use, more for larger ones? That would make them think again about alternatives).

    Problem is, interventionist government is very unpopular these days, so I don’t see measures like that coming any time soon.

Leave a Reply