A Field of Marigolds

I thought that Nightjar’s sunny Marigold photo from yesterday couldn’t be beat, but today she’s sent us an entire field of bright yellow Marigolds. I love the way the focus fades and the flowers start to look like bright yellow balloons bobbing in the breeze.

Marigolds (Calendula arvensis), ©Nightjar, all rights reserved

Thanks, Nightjar

Perfect

Just goes to show, Estonians are show-offs. Even their rivers make perfect circles of ice (article in Latvian, but it’s the visual that’s important).

Video here, I can’t seem to embed it, except like this: .

At any rate, it’s another interesting natural ice phenomenon known by various names, and observed in various parts of the world. Here’s National Geographic:

While the Russian ice circle is rare for its large size, the phenomenon isn’t quite as unusual as it might seem. Ice disks have been filmed in North DakotaWashington state, and Michigan.

Early theories of why the disks formed centered on erosion. Ice disks observed in 1987 and 1994 were in the path of flowing river waters. A paper published in 1997 by the Royal Meteorological Society theorized that flowing river water created a whirlpool effect. As the ice spun, researchers theorized, the borders eroded into a circular shape.

Published in the journal Physical Review E, researchers from the University of Liege in Belgium found that temperature changes—and not flowing rivers—prompted the spinning. As water warms it becomes less dense, and as it’s cooled by surface ice, a vortex forms.

Neat!

I was stuck between two songs, but this seems the most obvious choice:

(runnerup)

 

Jack’s Walk

Even my favorite resting spot seems uninviting today. ©voyager, all rights reserved

The warm, welcome sunshine of yesterday has given way to dark and gloomy skies today. It’s hard to tell what time it is outside because it always looks the same. There isn’t even any grainy  mist or fog to enhance the mood. It didn’t seem worth going back to the river because the ground is still muddy so Jack and I went exploring around the neighbourhood instead. I hope it gets colder soon (wow, I can’t believe I just said that!) because I think I know which direction the beaver den is, but I need firmer ground to get there. It’s winter. In Canada. It’s supposed to be cold.

Stepping Out of the Silence

I’m working on it. It doesn’t help that I have writings planned out in my head and keep choosing not to put them down in writing when I have half a chance.

In the meantime, see this excellent winter weather (this is Sunday morning around 11, in case anyone is wondering about my early rising habits).

©rq, all rights reserved.

Walking in a Winter Wonderland: part 7

A few final images of the Winter Wonderland. It is long gone now, being more of a brown yucky marshland now (I love our woods, but right now the smell of the stale water is often not too nice).

Needle ice


©Giliell, all rights reserved
More needle ice

frozen berries


©Giliell, all rights reserved
Frozen berries

frozen plants

©Giliell, all rights reserved

frozen plants


©Giliell, all rights reserved

iciles


©Giliell, all rights reserved

icicles

©Giliell, all rights reserved

icicles

©Giliell, all rights reserved

icicles

©Giliell, all rights reserved

©Giliell, all rights reserved
If the birds don’t cooperate, rely on the trees.

The last one is an interesting one. I did not get the bird I was trying to shoot, but I ended up with a damn interesting picture.

tree


©Giliell, all rights reserved

 

 

Friday Feathers

We have many wonderful reader contributions which I’ll post the next week (no, I haven’t forgotten those). For now it’s the rest of the birds that I met walking through a Winter Wonderland.

On the first day I walked past a shrubbery that is always full of birds, but as we were approaching they all flew away, but all in a certain direction. Some landed in that shrubbery and then took off as well. we soon spotted the reason for this:

common buzzard

©Giliell, all rights reserved

It’s a common buzzard, but they are not frequent in this particular area as it offers little space for soaring.

Walking further we then saw our usual small friends.

chaffinch

©Giliell, all rights reserved

I cannot quite decide between sparrow and lady chaffinch with the back and tail being hidden.

crow

©Giliell, all rights reserved

Crows are always slightly out of focus, I’m afraid.

crow

©Giliell, all rights reserved

Or hiding.

crow

©Giliell, all rights reserved

Or leaving.

great tit

©Giliell, all rights reserved

But you can always count on the tits.

 

Walking in a Winter Wonderland, part 6

In the morning of the 26th, we went for a walk in “our” woods, in the afternoon we visited my parents. I was saddened to see that some asshole had taken great pains to actually tie their plastic waste to the trees. There won’t be pics of that. We walked to the nearby fishing pond and back, bringing back childhood memories of walks with my grandparents.

sunset

©Giliell, all rights reserved

There wasn’t a lot of light that day, it was all foggy, but that pond is high enough to catch a glimpse of sunlight over the fog.

pond

©Giliell, all rights reserved

Just use a wide angle lens and low light and the Norwegian fjords can go fuck themselves.

pond

©Giliell, all rights reserved

Same pond, just from the opposite side.

pond

©Giliell, all rights reserved

The smaller pond was frozen over.

 

 

Walking in a Winter Wonderland, part 5

pond

©Giliell, all rights reserved

I’m not quite sure what the term for such a body of water is. It’s not a pond, but it fills quickly with water after rain.

blackbird

©Giliell, all rights reserved

The birds knew exactly that I only had the 250mm lens with me…

landscape

©Giliell, all rights reserved

And the wide angle lens.

This concludes the morning walk on the 26th, tomorrow we’ll see what we did in the afternoon.