B Is For Blue and Branco.


Blue. Branco, Portuguese for white. Click for full size!

© Nightjar, all rights reserved.

Comments

  1. says

    Looks like the little thistles I have growing wild all over our property. I’ve never known what they are, specifically, but they grow everywhere here. Hmm, these are ND thistles; the ones I can identify as being on property are Flodman, Wavyleaf, and Canada.

  2. Nightjar says

    Thanks, Caine and jazzlet. This is an old photo, from 2014, so I don’t remember very well and I’m not entirely sure of what it is. I do think it is a prickly sow-thistle, Sonchus asper. It definitely had spines, that I do remember, and I think the flowers were yellow and dandelion-like before going fluffy.

  3. Ice Swimmer says

    The light and shadow in the seedheads is wonderful.

    Giliell @ 5

    And the R in Europe can mean a few different things. I’d guess mine and yours are quite distant, for example. My R is like playing a slow diesel engine with the tip of the tongue behind the upper front teeth for three power strokes.

  4. Nightjar says

    That’s a good point, Giliell. I’m not sure why/how the L became an R. I am only aware of another language using the R and it’s Galician, Portuguese’s closest sibling.

  5. Nightjar says

    Ice Swimmer,

    My R is like playing a slow diesel engine with the tip of the tongue behind the upper front teeth for three power strokes

    That doesn’t sound very far from my R when it is in the beginning of a word or when it’s double (rr). In the case of branco it’s closer (but not quite the same) to the common English sound (as in bright). Portuguese has two very different sounds for R.

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