Slide into Fall.

Scored to a lilting piano soundtrack, the beauty of Colorado’s Rocky Mountain National Park is the perfect soothing balm to a sweaty summer. In a breathtaking 4K video, Evan Schneider captures expansive views of the Rocky Mountains sprinkled with shots of stunning vistas, luminous golden treetops, and falling leaves. Viewers are transported to the peaceful enclave of flawless nature, accompanied by a handful of friends and a handheld camera.

Schneider places you behind the driver’s seat as a car curves around enormous mountains, and situates his lens to fall in line with a hiker’s steps. That feeling of autumnal chill, along with the head-high of reaching a mountain’s summit, is all here. It’s a terrific way to soak up the feels of fall without making the commitment to travel—or even lacing up those old hiking boots.

Via The Creators Project.

The Artful Science of Mending.

Mending tears with Japanese paper. Photos courtesy of Alvarez Fine Arts Services unless otherwise noted.

Mending tears with Japanese paper. Photos courtesy of Alvarez Fine Arts Services unless otherwise noted.

While conservators in a museum setting work towards exhibitions that are scheduled years in advance, private practitioners often have to work at a much faster clip, while still upholding the required methodological and ethical standards. “More and more, our schedule is governed by auction dates and major art fairs around the world,” notes Jason Marquis, the studio manager at Alvarez Fine Arts Services, a New York-based private paper conservation studio founded by Antonio Alvarez and Scott Krawitz in 1984. With Art Basel less than two months away, the Alvarez team, which includes four full-time conservators, is gearing up for a busy season.

On the plus side, those intensive turnaround times—along with a diverse client base—make for a rich variety of projects. In addition to taking on work for smaller museums that do not have an in-house paper conservation staff, the Alvarez studio primarily does business with auction houses, art dealers, and collectors, who are looking to treat artworks before they are exhibited or sold. Meanwhile, some projects are brought to them because of their personal, rather than cultural, importance—like letters and diplomas. “But we don’t think about value when things come through here,” explains Marquis. “We treat everything as though it’s priceless, whether it’s a sentimental drawing from someone’s grandmother, or a million-dollar work.”

Antique fishing lure boxes. Photo by the author.

Antique fishing lure boxes. Photo by the author.

“According to the collector,” says Skura, “the boxes are worth even more than the objects.” And while the client was hoping to have the labels removed, cleaned, then put back on, Skura is instead recommending a less aggressive approach that will leave the labels as is, and extract the dirt with dry sponges. “What is technically possible isn’t always ethically sound,” says Marquis—a magic phrase he often has to use with clients. “It’s like going to the doctor and asking for a treatment, and the doctor has to explain why it’s not such a good idea,” adds Skura.

I collect old medicines, and have many amazingly beautiful boxes full of various herbs, and yes, the boxes are so very important. The artwork, the information, there’s so much richness and history there. I had never even thought about having these restored. The full article is excellent, and there’s more to see at The Creators Project.

Phase one, complete.

The painting is done. I’ll have to do heat setting after the last three horses are dry, then in a couple days, the big test, washing it. After that, it’s all yours, Giliell, assuming it makes it out of the wash okay.  Sorry about the gate lines, it’s really windy out, so I had to clip it down on the gate.

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© C. Ford.

Šuŋkawakaŋ Day.

[My] Tomorrow (Saturday, 8th Oct.) will most likely see Affinity closed for the day, I absolutely have to work. I have a beautiful, 200 count, white muslin, 90″ x 108″, arriving soon, which I’ll be painting, then freehand quilting, so it can be quickly done and donated to Standing Rock for winter. I spent time on horse sketching, then pulled out my test fabric, which is most definitely not 200 count, it’s cheap muslin. Even so, I haven’t played with all the various fabric paints I’ve come by, and now’s the time, so that I don’t fuck up that lovely fabric on the way. I didn’t even get the first bloody horse finished today, and I managed to completely forget what hours bent over a table do to my spine. (Insert scream here.) The first horse is roughly 26″ x 14″. I have to finish the first horse, then get eight more done. (I also need to do this, not just for testing various media, I need to work out colours, patterns, all that jazz.) I really hate to disappoint people, and if I can get a few things posted, I will, but don’t worry if I don’t show at all. I’ll definitely be back on Sunday.

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© C. Ford.

Hehaka Tȟahá.

I keep forgetting, I got a beautiful elk hide at wačipi. It’s back to being safely tucked away for when I have time to work on it. Roughly 70something inches x 50something inches. No, I don’t know yet. Well, I know what I’m going to do with part of it, not all, and it’s something for us, so it won’t be for sale.

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© C. Ford.

Christa Resurrected.

 The artist Edwina Sandys with her sculpture “Christa,” the centerpiece of an exhibition of more than 50 contemporary works that interpret the symbolism associated with the image of Jesus. Credit Hiroko Masuike/The New York Times.

The artist Edwina Sandys with her sculpture “Christa,” the centerpiece of an exhibition of more than 50 contemporary works that interpret the symbolism associated with the image of Jesus. Credit Hiroko Masuike/The New York Times.

Edwina Sandys had seen this before: the 250-pound bronze statue of a bare-breasted woman on a translucent acrylic cross being installed in the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine.

This time around, however, she does not expect to see something else she had seen before: the statue being packed up after a call from a ranking church official telling her it had to go.

That happened the first time “Christa,” Ms. Sandys’s sculpture of a crucified woman, was shown at the cathedral in Manhattan during Holy Week in 1984.

A controversy erupted, complete with hate mail attacking it as blasphemous. Overruling the dean of the cathedral at the time, the suffragan bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of New York called the statue “theologically and historically indefensible” and ordered Ms. Sandys to take it away.

This time, it is being installed on the altar in the Chapel of St. Saviour as the centerpiece of “The Christa Project: Manifesting Divine Bodies,” an exhibition of more than 50 contemporary works that interpret — or reinterpret — the symbolism associated with the image of Jesus.

[…]

She came to know the Very Rev. James Park Morton, the dean of the cathedral for 25 years until 1996. “I said, ‘How brave are you?’” in 1984, she recalled. “He may not have said ‘try me,’ but words to that effect. I said, ‘How would you like to exhibit “Christa,” the female Christ?’ He said, ‘I’d be delighted.’ I took a deep breath, and that was that.”

Except with that, as Ms. Sandys put it, “all hell broke loose.” Angry letters arrived (the cathedral preserved them in its archives) and, according to Ms. Sandys, the suffragan bishop, Walter Dennis, “said he didn’t want it, and I had to come and get ‘Christa.’”

The full story of Christa is here.

Cool Stuff Friday.

Embroidery Artist Weaves Memes with Modern Feminism.

Images courtesy the artist.

Images courtesy the artist.

Leather Landscapes as Self-Portraits of Fetish and Devotion.

Tamara Santibañez - Landscape II (Massif) - 40" x 60" Oil on canvas, 2016. Image courtesy of Slow Culture Gallery.

Tamara Santibañez – Landscape II (Massif) – 40″ x 60″ Oil on canvas, 2016. Image courtesy of Slow Culture Gallery.

 

Tamara Santibañez studio, image courtesy of CJ Parel.

Tamara Santibañez studio, image courtesy of CJ Parel.

[I really, really want to own that.]

Bacteria-Inspired Art Infects a Chelsea Gallery.

Bomb Ayran, Slavs and Tatars, 2016.

Bomb Ayran, Slavs and Tatars, 2016.

 

Make Mongolia Great Again, Slavs and Tatars, 2016.

Make Mongolia Great Again, Slavs and Tatars, 2016.

The Miniature Beehive Nightclub Is for City Bees Only.

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All via The Creators Project.

Now It’s A Coaster.

Thomas Chung in his workplace. Photo by Kyle Clayton.

Thomas Chung in his workplace. Photo by Kyle Clayton.

There’s a terrific article about North Anchorage, Alaska artist Thomas Chung, who will be exhibiting tomorrow at Becky Gallery October 7, reception 5 – 8 p.m.

With a background in cultural anthropology, Chung combines symbols from various myths and stories along with contemporary brands like Coke and Jägermeister
“There’s something kind of funny about Jägermeister,” Chung said as he held a rubber circle mat with the deer and cross logo. “He’s that saint who was a hunter and ran into a deer and this glowing, crazy cross appeared and that’s how he found God. Now it’s a coaster.”

The full article is here. You can see more of Professor Chung’s work here.