The Art of Book Design: A Visit From St. Nicholas (‘Twas The Night Before Christmas)

Clement Clarke Moore. A visit from St. Nicholas, Boston, Published by L. Prang & Co, 1864.

It was a tradition in my family to read this poem every Christmas Eve just before bedtime when I was young. The poem was first published anonymously in 1823, but Moore admitted authorship in 1837. The poem is credited with cementing the idea of Santa Claus and gift-giving into the Christmas traditions of modern times. This is the earliest edition that I was able to locate, and the entire poem is included beneath the fold.

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Jack’s Walk

©voyager, all rights reserved

Here are a few food safety tips for your pet over the holidays.

  •  Keep chocolate out of reach from your dog. It’s toxic to then.
  •  Keep alcohol out of reach of pets. I used to have a cat with a taste for brown cows.
  •  Limit table scraps. Too much rich food may cause diarrhea, gastric upset and potentially, pancreatitis.
  •  Give pet safe scraps only. White meat with no skin, unsalted and unbuttered veggies and plain white rice are good options.
  •  Don’t give your pet bones and mind the turkey carcass. Cooked bones can splinter easily and cause injury to teeth or gastric systems of both cats and dogs.
  •  Don’t let your pet eat raw dough. Yeast might still rise after ingestion or release fermented sugars, which can cause ethanol poisoning.
  •  Wash pans right away or put them out of reach of your pet.
  •  Don’t leave cookies and milk for Santa within your pet’s reach.  Leave Santa a note telling him where the treats are if he wants one.

source – Top Dog Tips

source – Catster

Jack’s Walk

©voyager, all rights reserved

Jack and I want to talk about a few ways to keep your pet safe and happy over the holidays. Christmas can be stressful for our pets, but there are some simple things you can do to make it a happier, healthier time. We’ll be breaking it down into a few categories, and today we’ll begin with some safety tips to keep in mind while you decorate your home.

  •  Don’t use lilies, holly, mistletoe or poinsettia because they are all poisonous to your dog. Lilies are also highly toxic to cats and poinsettia can make your cat quite sick.
  • Don’t use real candles. If you must light real candles, blow them out when you leave the room. Keep candles out of reach. This is especially important for people who have cats that jump and knock things over.
  •  Use an artificial tree. It will be less interesting for your dog or cat.
  •  Anchor your Christmas tree.
  •  Don’t decorate the bottom part of the tree, it will only entice your pet.
  •  Block off the tree with a pet gate if your dog won’t’ leave the tree alone. Ditto for cats, which may also be dissuaded by tin foil around the edge of the tree skirt.
  •  Don’t use tinsel. It can cause serious problems if your pet ingests it.
  •  No edible decorations, such as popcorn and cranberry garlands or flour cookies.
  •  Block off access to the tree water if you have a real tree. The water is stagnant and can be full of bacteria. It could also contain a “tea” of pine needles, which will make both cats and dogs sick.
  •  Keep wiring and extension cords our of reach. They can cause severe injury if chewed through. They also give the animal an opportunity to knock something over.
  •  Keep it simple. Too many loud or obnoxious decorations can put your dog or cat on edge.
  •  Don’t use ribbon on packages that could entice your cat or dog to eat it. (cats eat the ribbon, ditto for dogs, who also may eat the whole package) Keep gifts out of reach if possible.
  • No glass ornaments. They can break too easily and the shards can cut your animal and can cause serious harm if ingested.
  •  Beware of Snow-Globes, which may leak or break if knocked over.  What’s inside them can be very toxic.
  • Unplug the lights when you go out or to bed. If your pet chews the cord while it’s plugged in, they can receive serious burns or electrocution.
  • Pretend like the tree is no big deal and provide other distractions for your pet. Food puzzles and new toys are an excellent way to keep your pet occupied. Empty boxes also work well for cats.

So there you have it. Some common sense ways to make the holidays happier and healthier for your pet. Tomorrow we’ll look at food safety tips over the holidays for your cat and dog.

source,  Top Dog Tips

source, Catster

source,  Consumer Reports

Jack’s Walk

Jack wouldn’t look at me for this photo. He was too embarrassed.

Despite the silly photo, Jack and I would like to talk about something serious today, and that is why it’s a bad idea to give an animal as a gift at Christmas. It seems like such a fun thing to give a puppy or kitten at Christmas, but it’s a terrible time of year to bring a new animal into your home, so Jack and I would like to share this list from Paws for Hope with some excellent reasons to not get a puppy or a kitten at Christmastime.

1. ALL THE CHRISTMAS CHEER!
The holidays are a busy time of year. We are often coming and going, more often than usual, from our homes to festive celebrations, shopping etc. When bringing a new pet into your home it is important for them to have your attention so that you and your new family member can create a trustworthy bond. This can be a very stressful time for pets, and an extra busy household that is full of excitement can make the transition process very difficult. If you are adopting a young animal the training required can be very time consuming and some animals require lots of exercise. Training should start immediately, not after the holidays are over. Most of us don’t have a spare moment during the holiday season, making if very difficult to find the time to train. The best way to alleviate the stress and fear a pet may have coming into your home is be home as often as you can, keep a consistent schedule and maintain a calm environment.

2. SANTA PAWS DOES NOT EXIST.
Gifting someone a pet for a present is just a bad idea. Choosing the right pet is a very personal decision and not one to be made by someone other than the new adoptive parent/family. Picking the right pet personality to suit you/your families is something for you and only you to do. Pets are not products, they are living creatures, like us, and they should NEVER be sold in a retail setting and purchased as presents. Even if adopting from a local shelter or rescue, gifting a pet gives the wrong impression, especially to children, that this new pet is a toy. You want your children to understand the responsibilities of caring for an animal and for your new pet to not end up being ignored after the novelty wears off.
Hold off bringing a pet home from a shelter and head on down to your best friend’s chocolatier and by them a box instead! Or give them a gift certificate for a pet adoption after the holidays are over.

3. FILL MY STOCKING WITH A DUPLEX AND CHEQUES……..
Deciding to expand your family to include a pet is also committing to taking on the financial responsibility that comes along with them, much of which is unforeseen. This may not be fully thought through if you decide on a whim to adopt during the holidays as you are swept up in the magical time of year and decide to help a pet in need and bring home an animal from your local shelter. Purchasing or adopting an animal is a costly decision, from food, litter, regular and emergency veterinary care (like when your Pitbull Lucy gets pneumonia from eating goose poop!). And let’s not forget the pets who will require walkers, daycare and will need somewhere like a boarding kennel or pet sitter when you take your annual vacation or frequent business trips. Please fully consider all of the responsibilities that go along with having a pet any time of the year.

I’d like to add winter weather to the list, which makes it a difficult time to house train a puppy or a rescue dog.

 

From Paws for Hope Animal Welfare, B.C.