When A Tongue Dies.


And for all of us who never saw a man in the moon, but a hare (or rabbit).

There are eight more wonderful, well worth seeing Indigenous shorts to see here.

Comments

  1. DonDueed says

    Ha! Ever since I learned about the “hare in the moon” that’s all I can see.

    I think they used the jumping rabbit shape when they did the animation for the Watership Down movie. One El-arairah story sequence shows an arcing rabbit form that looks exactly like the moon bunny.

  2. DonDueed says

    On a different note… I really enjoy listening to indigenous voices, even if I don’t understand what they’re saying.

    Years ago I drove around the Four Corners country for a week, and I kept the radio on the Navajo station. Much of the programming is in the Navajo language. It was fascinating to hear a language so different from what I’m used to, and from European languages in general. I thought Navajo sounded a bit like Japanese but then I don’t speak any Asian language so I may have heard what I expected (knowing the probable relatively recent Asian origin of the Navajo people).

  3. DonDueed says

    The movie of Watership Down is fairly faithful to the book, but for me it didn’t pack the same emotional punch. People who saw the movie without having read the book first supposedly found it confusing.

    It does have an Art Garfunkle song in it, which is nice.

  4. says

    Poor hare, stuck on the moon forever, alone…

    I never understood the whole anything in the moon business. I cannot see a face there, nor a hare or anything else. I also never understood the whole constellation thing. All I can see in the sky is a load of triangles. I am not immune to this, but I think overall the pattern has to be more pronounced for pareidolia to kick in for me.

  5. says

    Charly:

    It took a very long time for me to see a hare in the moon, it wasn’t until I was in my teens. Prior to that, all I ever saw were craters. I’m with you on the constellation thing -- I just can’t see what other people see. I’ve had more than one person tell me that’s very odd for an artist, and I suppose it is, but I just don’t see figures in the sky. I’m very prone to attraction of natural patterns though -- I can get lost slicing up a head of red cabbage, because the patterns are so gorgeous.

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