Raturday


River helps herself to a rare treat. The second photo is River’s Do you mind? face.

River

River1

© C. Ford. All rights reserved.

Comments

  1. says

    There’s a world of expression in those ears!

    Oh, it’s chocolate boost, basically chocolate milk with vitamins.

  2. says

    Blf @ 4:

    Why not? :D

    TMM @ 5:

    Oh my. I want to kiss that soft little ratty head.

    River would let you, too. She is just sweet, all the way through. It’s hard to capture on camera, but she is multi-shaded gray, leaning into blue. River is one quarter Rex, but unlike her sibs, she didn’t get the wavy fur and curled whiskers. She has the full Rex temperament though.

  3. says

    Patricia @ 7:

    AW!! In the photo River looks a lot like our rat-girl Ginger.

    You have a rat! They are the best. Oh, next week I’ll be able to buy your book, and once it arrives, I’ll blog it again. :)

  4. Ice Swimmer says

    The fur is so shiny. I wish my hair and beard would be as shiny and that shade of grey in ten or twenty years. I love the hands grabbing the edge of the cup.

  5. Patricia Phillips says

    Caine @7 -- yes, we got 2 female rats at Christmas. Daughter has been dying for furry pets (we have a tortoise -- cute but not as cuddly as mammals) & she thought rats wd be great. I’ve kept them before as pets but not in many years. So, we got cage etc & 2 girls, named Ginger and Nutmeg (inspired by all the seasonal gingerbread baking).

    Hope you enjoy the book! Our tribes have lost so much -- between the epidemics, getting shuffled around, people scattered…it’s been tough. But I’ve been enjoying tracking down any information I can on plants-unlike our neighbors to the south and north, so little has been published on western Oregon ethnobotany. I thought I’d contribute something. Fun to watch is how all the other western OR tribes have also been very busy working on ethnobotanical type projects -- preserving camas meadows, medicine trees, all kinds of basket plants.

  6. says

    Patricia @ 11:

    Hope you enjoy the book! Our tribes have lost so much – between the epidemics, getting shuffled around, people scattered…it’s been tough. But I’ve been enjoying tracking down any information I can on plants-unlike our neighbors to the south and north, so little has been published on western Oregon ethnobotany. I thought I’d contribute something. Fun to watch is how all the other western OR tribes have also been very busy working on ethnobotanical type projects – preserving camas meadows, medicine trees, all kinds of basket plants.

    Yeah, it’s important, recovering knowledge, and preserving tradition. Marty Two Bulls has a relevant cartoon up about that today: http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2016/07/03/national-park-services-permission

Leave a Reply