Is Cody spying on me?


OK, this is creepy. Just the other day I posted about the Morris police being disbanded, and now this video comes out.

One particularly good point he made: who is our sheriff? I didn’t know! So I looked him up. It’s Jason Dingman. I don’t know if he’s a good guy, I don’t know whether I voted for him or not, but for sure I’ll scrutinize the candidate(s) in the next election.

Now Cody: get the camera or keylogger out of my office.

Comments

  1. Pierce R. Butler says

    Our esteemed host shouldn’t get too excited about the potential for major changes in local law enforcement:

    The remaining Police Department employees will be offered jobs with the Sheriff’s Office, according to Sheriff Jason Dingman. … Dingman said at the Morris City Council meeting on July 12. “I can guarantee to the citizens of Morris that they’re not going to see a blip on the radar as far as coverage.”

  2. John Morales says

    USA is weird.

    Looking at Wikipedia about Minnesota, I read:
    “In order to be elected to the office of County Sheriff, the candidate must be actively employed in a law enforcement vocation.”

    Presumably that means that all sheriffs are cops, though not all cops are sheriffs.

    (And they’re elected by the populace, rather than appointed on merit? Huh)

  3. consciousness razor says

    John Morales:

    Presumably that means that all sheriffs are cops, though not all cops are sheriffs.

    They’re (nearly all) “law enforcement officers” prior to their election, or “cops” since that’s also a fairly broad term. But, except in some very unusual cases perhaps, sheriffs don’t come from other law enforcement agencies like municipal or state police, the FBI, DEA, etc.

    They are very likely to be deputies in that sheriff department’s county where the election takes place. At least in the counties where I’ve lived, I don’t think there have ever been any exceptions to that.

    (And they’re elected by the populace, rather than appointed on merit? Huh)

    It’s the same deal with many state and local (district or circuit) judges, district attorneys or county prosecutors, court clerks, local school boards, county assessors, county recorders of deeds, county clerks, county commissioners, and so forth.

    If they had to be based on merit, a lot of places would be incapable of filling such positions, but I suppose we could still try out appointments anyway.

    If you want somebody who knows what they’re doing and got the job for that reason, it may be mostly likely in the case of a city manager, say, assuming that type of position even exists. Outside of that, the elected officials will more often than not just hire a private contractor of some kind (who’s also a cousin, drinking buddy, donor, or whatever … maybe all of the above). If those people don’t know what they’re doing and/or don’t want to do it, it’s still “okay” as long as nobody knows who to blame once the shit hits the fan. The additional layers of finger pointing make it easier to pull that off and escape accountability.

  4. consciousness razor says

    But, except in some very unusual cases perhaps, sheriffs don’t come from other law enforcement agencies like municipal or state police, the FBI, DEA, etc.

    Well, they might switch over from municipal police somewhat regularly. I don’t know. In any case, they’d like it to at least mean a raise and/or less work. Otherwise, what would be the point?

  5. John Morales says

    Otherwise, what would be the point?

    Cynical as I may be, still I’d like to think that, for at least some, civic duty would be a factor. The exception that proves the rule. :|

  6. consciousness razor says

    John Morales:

    Cynical as I may be, still I’d like to think that, for at least some, civic duty would be a factor.

    It can also happen that the old sheriff, having been reelected since the dawn of time, finally kicked the bucket or retired one day, so “leadership” was thrust upon the new chosen one. In any case, they do (ostensibly) have a civic duty as deputies too, so could that really explain it? They might be more effective in that kind of position after all. It’s like Kirk becoming a Rear Admiral … not a good fit, you know?

    Whatever other motivations some might have, it’s not like they’re turning down more money and less work. (Also more power, of course.) Maybe I am little too cynical today — I was just watching some of the Jan. 6 hearing, so I have a good excuse — but take that as just a matter of fact.

  7. says

    Welp, I watched the video and it turns out I’ve got a new level of disgust for sheriffs. I know I shouldn’t be surprised anymore, but I manage to be surprised.

  8. Pierce R. Butler says

    consciousness razor @ # 6: They’re (nearly all) “law enforcement officers” prior to their election… But, except in some very unusual cases perhaps, sheriffs don’t come from other law enforcement agencies …

    That depends a lot on location. Where I now live, the current sheriff was previously a state representative (and before that, a chief of police and city manager – yes, at the same time); the sheriff before him served (very visibly) in the police department of the largest city in the county; her predecessor had run an insurance agency and went on to the state senate – iow, our sheriffs are a mix of law enforcement and run-of-the-mill politicians. That same largest city for several years had a police chief who also made a great Elvis imitator, though (alas, after that he disappeared into the state bureaucracy), so maybe we’re just weird that way.

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