Mary’s Monday Metazoan: Not candy


metro.co.uk

metro.co.uk

No, you’ll never convince me to eat it.

Comments

  1. Tethys says

    Huh, I’ve never seen one of these candy colored moths., and I tend to notice insects much more than most people. Minnesota is the edge of its range. I suppose that means that this summer I will see all sorts of rosy maple moths.

  2. prae says

    It’s Fluttershy! Wait… why do I know this name?

    As for insects: I’d at least try some, if they are sufficiently deep-fried.

  3. JCfromNC says

    Well, pooh. Clearly I need to remember to use the “preview” button, as there’s no edit function here.

  4. timothyeisele says

    Chigau: Yes, that’s generally a good rule of thumb – if an insect is brightly colored or otherwise very easy to see, more often than not it is toxic (and it is using warning coloration to advertise the fact). Particularly if it is also slow-moving and easy to catch.

  5. inflection says

    Ah, I see the connection has already been mentioned: the rosy maple moth shares the pink-and-cream coloration of Fluttershy, and so has been enjoying a mild popularity among pony fans.

  6. nahuati says

    Speaking of insects, could grubs solve malnutrition in Cameroon?

    Grubs are a great source of protein. The video reports that a grub farming project is hoping to solve the malnutrition problem which affects one in three children in Cameroon. Eight to ten times as many grubs can be raised in a plastic container with one raffia palm than in the wild where the grubs are difficult to find.

  7. nahuati says

    Speaking of eating insects, could grubs solve malnutrition in Cameroon?

    Through a grub farming project, they are hoping to alleviate the malnutrition problem which affects one in three children in Cameroon. This area looks especially promising because grubs are such a great source of protein. Eight to ten times as many grubs can be raised in a plastic container with one raffia palm than in the wild where grubs are difficult to find.