Fools And Their Money Are Soon Departed: The ignorant will buy anything


And when I say “they will buy anything”, I mean both financially and believing nonsense.

It’s bad enough that conspiracy “theory” pinheads believe and spew nonsense.  There are hilarious stories of people separating fools from their money.  Remember the fools who bought Faraday cages to “protect their wi-fi”?

But it’s worse when the unscrupulous people don’t care if they hurt people.  This might be worse than when companies in China used lead paint and melanine in products.

Anti-5G necklaces found to be radioactive

The Dutch authority for nuclear safety and radiation protection (ANVS) issued a warning about ten products it found gave off harmful ionising radiation.

It urged people not to use the products, which could cause harm with long-term wear.

There is no evidence that 5G networks are harmful to health.

[. . .]

“Don’t wear it any more, put it away safely and wait for the return instructions,” the ANVS said in a statement.

“The sellers in the Netherlands known to the ANVS have been told that the sale is prohibited and must be stopped immediately, and that they must inform their customers about this.”

Conspiracy theories have fuelled a market of “anti-5G” devices that are typically found to have no effect.

In May 2020, the UK’s Trading Standards sought to halt sales of a £339 USB stick that claimed to offer “protection” from 5G.

Comments

  1. garnetstar says

    I saw that, about fainted. How could anyone sell radioactive isotopes?

    How could you be so cruel, is first. But then, where did you get the material? And, why did you put it in? Your dupes won’t see any difference if you did or not, since it isn’t going to do anything about 5G. So, you went out and found a cruel and expensive and difficult-to-get fake thing to put into the items?

    Then, when your dupes started feeling weak or noticed radiation burns under the necklace, did you think they woudn’t know it was that?

    Someone is just putting being cruel above all else.

  2. brucegee1962 says

    This sounds like a classic example of someone who knew just enough to be dangerous. I’ve got these radioactive isotopes, and cell phones use radiation — therefore, profit! (I may have skipped a few steps in my logic there, but I’m sure they didn’t contain anything important.)

  3. beholder says

    Remember the fools who bought Faraday cages to “protect their wi-fi”?

    You may scoff at the concept, but caging a router with permissive initial settings after a factory reset is sometimes a good idea, if an unknown adversary is racing to set up their configuration before yours.

    The foolishness is that they paid for a cage, instead of wrapping their router in a few cents’ worth of aluminum foil.

  4. says

    As a Dutchman, I had a look at the source (ANVS website).
    From that, I was able to find the original report from the RIVM that did the investigation.

    The radiation comes from decay products of Th-232, U-238 and U-235, although the latter was only detected in two samples.

    If you were to wear one of those products close to you skin for a year, you would receive an equivalent dose of between 12 en 50 mSv. Mostly in the form of β-radiation.
    The dose limit in the Netherlands is 50 mSv/year, so that’s why these products were banned.

    The affected products are shown here.

  5. beholder says

    @6 rsmith

    If you were to wear one of those products close to you skin for a year, you would receive an equivalent dose of between 12 en 50 mSv. Mostly in the form of β-radiation.
    The dose limit in the Netherlands is 50 mSv/year, so that’s why these products were banned.

    For comparison, the natural background dose on Earth is 4 * 10^-3 Sv/year, which is in that ballpark. Not much cause for concern, but it sounds like the ANVS is raising the alarm out of an abundance of caution.

    Mostly in the form of β-radiation

    Again, something that can be solved with more aluminum foil.

  6. witm says

    My reaction was: “Oh, more of that kind of thing”. There is a youtube science channel (I forget which, I’m not a subscriber) that tested a whole bunch of products and got them recalled by the FDA for radioactivity. It’s not exactly a new thing. Combined with some old reporting by the Merseyside Skeptics this came across about as surprising as a bridge collapse in China or a shooting in the US. I am mostly just glad someone is actually doing their job and getting shit products off the market – maybe Goop next?

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