Securing A Position With Bigotry: The Notpology.


Ali Jimenez-Hopper said of her Democratic opponent, "She brings up that she is half black and she uses that as a strength. She brings up that she is in support of LGBT and that lifestyle and puts out pictures on Twitter of her and her wife."

Ali Jimenez-Hopper said of her Democratic opponent, “She brings up that she is half black and she uses that as a strength. She brings up that she is in support of LGBT and that lifestyle and puts out pictures on Twitter of her and her wife.” Credit: screenshot.

Remember Ms. Jimenez-Hopper, who secured a position with open bigotry against her opponent? She’s back, with a sparkly notpology, blaming the democrats because they always twist the words of good republicans to look like bigotry. It just couldn’t have been anything she said, no.

Jimenez-Hopper claimed her comments were somehow misconstrued. For that she blamed Democrats.

“Unlike my opponent, I am new to the political process and sometimes say things in a way that can be twisted around and out of context by the Democrats,” Jimenez-Hopper said. “I apologize to anyone I offended by my comments. As a Hispanic American, it is my hope that voters in Apple Valley judge both of us by where we stand on the issues, and not simply by the color of our skin or who we are married to.”

Oh my. Ms. Jimenez-Hopper jumped all over her opponent Erin Maye Quade for bringing up that she’s half black, saying she used it as a strength, and somehow that was very wrong. Apparently it’s perfectly okay for her to bring up being a Hispanic American. Oh, the mealy-mouthed hypocrisy. You can always count on republicans for some things, and that’s one of them.

The allegation Maye Quade is somehow guilty of the sin of identity politics for not concealing her identity was echoed by other Republicans in her district.

AJH1

So people should not take Ms. Maye Quade’s being biracial or lesbian into account when voting? Well, SD57 Republicans, I have terrible news for you all. I do take such things into account when considering candidates. Being mixed race myself, I’m much more likely to vote for someone who is an Indigenous person, as well as democrat. As someone who is also under the queer nation umbrella, that matters to me too. A candidate who is also under that umbrella is more likely to be active in issues which I’m concerned with. That’s how this whole voting thing works. That’s why bigots vote for assholes who say things like “identity politics”. So surprising you haven’t figured this out, being in politics. :eyeroll:

ThinkProgress has the full story.

Comments

  1. Siobhan says

    …I, what? They do it too! They’ll specifically AVOID voting for black or nonreligious or queer candidates. If that’s not identity politics I don’t know what is.

  2. blf says

    I’m reminded of the very famous Lee Atwater quote:

    You start out in 1954 by saying, “N[…], n[…], n[…].” By 1968 you can’t say “n[…]” β€” that hurts you. Backfires. So you say stuff like forced busing, states’ rights and all that stuff. You’re getting so abstract now {that} you’re talking about cutting taxes, and all these things you’re talking about are totally economic things and a byproduct of them is {that} blacks get hurt worse than whites. And subconsciously maybe that is part of it. I’m not saying that. But I’m saying that if it is getting that abstract, and that coded, that we are doing away with the racial problem one way or the other. You follow me β€” because obviously sitting around saying, “We want to cut this,” is much more abstract than even the busing thing, and a hell of a lot more abstract than “N[…], n[…].”

  3. says

    Republican bullshit is infuriating. This:

    As a Hispanic American, it is my hope that voters in Apple Valley judge both of us by where we stand on the issues,

    irritated me no end. It’s obvious she’s smacking herself for not being smart enough to simply bring up her own heritage in response to Maye Quade, so she brings it up now, where it has zero relevance. What does being Hispanic American have to do with hoping voters pay attention to issues? She could not have been more obvious earlier, about thinking her heritage was irrelevant to her particular political positions.

    I can’t stand republicans.

  4. schini says

    Well, I don’t live in the US, but I can’t help but observe, that

    … it is my hope that voters in Apple Valley judge both of us by where we stand on the issues, and not simply by the color of our skin or who we are married to …

    would be a perfectly valid position, actually -- one could argue -- the preferred one. Well, of course only if it was a sincere position, not a pretend one. But since Republicans nowadays usually quite obviously do not really think that way, I guess it is a pretend.

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