All the Gatherers


are out in force. (Part one, I got a lot of photos. I know, these are overexposed, but the bee is adorable.)

AG1

AG2

Ag3

AG4

AG5

Photos © C. Ford

Comments

  1. AlexanderZ says

    For some reason this year there are very few pollinators around here. It keeps worrying me.

  2. says

    Yeah, I understand. We’ve seen fewer pollinators every year for over a decade, but they have bounced back a little bit the last couple of years.

  3. Ice Swimmer says

    The bumblebee works great in the pictures. There are big bumblebees here as well now (the Founding Mothers of the nests 8-).

  4. Ice Swimmer says

    Bumblebee is kimalainen in Finnish, honeybee is mehiläinen, wasp is ampiainen, hornet is herhiläinen and ant is muurahainen. The -inen ending might be a diminutive in these words. The name for honeybee is related to the word that currently means the nectar in flowers but was used originally for honey, mesi.

  5. dakotagreasemonkey says

    Were those flowers the wild American Plum? I just saw that the American Plum trees here at work are in full bloom, from 150 yards away. Haven’t had an opportunity to go out to the tree rows to see them up close. I’ll do that this weekend.
    I’ve only seen 3 or 4 bees this year, so far. Historically, it is still a few weeks early to see them, so I’m hoping to see more real soon.

  6. rq says

    All the fruit trees around here are in full bloom.
    Also, our neighbours tend bees, so we never lack any pollinators -- we just make sure to plant delicious fruit trees to take advantage. Besides, we always get a bucket of honey at the end of summer…

  7. chigau (違う) says

    rq

    …our neighbours tend bees … we always get a bucket of honey at the end of summer

    What is Internetspeak for “You are very fortunate (I.am.insanely.jealous).”?

  8. says

    Thanks for all the kind words.

    Ice Swimmer:

    Bumblebee is kimalainen in Finnish, honeybee is mehiläinen, wasp is ampiainen, hornet is herhiläinen and ant is muurahainen. The -inen ending might be a diminutive in these words. The name for honeybee is related to the word that currently means the nectar in flowers but was used originally for honey, mesi.

    Ooh, lovely. There were lots more bees out today, while I was photographing birds on the deck.

    DG:

    Were those flowers the wild American Plum?

    Um…yes? The ones on the side of the house, by Lawrence’s. I thought you told me those were something else.

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