Friday Feathers


Admit it, you’ve been missing the tit pics.

blue tit among bird cherries

©Giliell, all rights reserved

The tree is a “bird cherry”. They grow here en masse and the stains can only be removed with a pair of scissors.

 

Comments

  1. kestrel says

    I have *indeed* been missing the tit pics, so thank you for this. Now I have my tit quota for the day and I appreciate it! Thanks!

  2. says

    Oh. Tit pics. I will post some too, as soon as those buggers decide to show up again. My garden has been mysteriously bird-free for weeks by now.

    The tree looks like Prunus padus, Gewöhnliche Traubenkirsche in German.It grows aplenty where I live too, but I have no experience with its stains. However I think the plant was used in dyes. I have never worked with its wood, but I would much love to, allegedly it is pretty and hard wood.

  3. rq says

    100% missed the tit picks. This is a good comeback shot!
    Also I know bird cherries… Lovely in spring, but keep away in autumn. Esp wearing light-coloured clothes.

  4. rq says

    It’s called ieva here, Ieva being the equivalent of Eve. A harbinger of cold weather in May, but I think it’s just because its blossoming coincides with the last gasp of winter.

  5. Ice Swimmer says

    I also admit having missed tit pics, but I couldn’t have imagined getting to see a tit from behind.

    Bird cherry is tuomi in Finnish. In Swedish it’s hägg. In Finnish Tuomi and Tuominen and Tuomela are fairly common last names (-nen and -la are common suffixes used in last names, -nen is an archaic genetive-like ending, -la denotes the the place for or of something or someone). Häggblom (bird cherry flower) and Häggkvist (bird cherry branch) are Swedish last names.

    Eeva, Finnish version of Eve is pronounced Ieva in Savonian dialects of Finnish (spoken in eastern parts of the Finnish Lake District), in which they ‘bend’ some long wovels into diphthongs and some diphthongs into long wovels or other diphthongs. In English-speaking world the Australian English does things that have a somewhat similar feel to them.

  6. ridana says

    Yikes, I just saw a piece on the BBC about great tits hunting and eating bats in Hungary and Poland. They go after ones waking up but still drowsy from hibernation. As this has been observed for around 20 years now, they’re also apparently passing this behavior down to offspring and neighbors. Fortunately for the bats, if there’s other food available, the tits prefer that and only hunt the bats as needed.

    Nature never stops being beautiful and icky. :)

  7. lumipuna says

    It seems to me that the name “bird cherry” was translated from Latin “cerasus avium”, originally meaning the wild type of sweet cherry. Both are native in Britain, but Prunus padus is apparently more common so the meaning shifted. According to Wikipedia, older names include hagberry or hackberry.

    Sweet cherry as a species in now scientifically named Prunus avium, and its wild type is known as “wild cherry” in English. The other cultivated species, sour cherry (P. cerasus) isn’t native in Europe.

    P. padus and other species in the same subgenus are now collectively called bird cherries, while proper cherries belong in another subgenus. P. padus is sometimes formally called northern bird cherry.

  8. rq says

    ridana
    Oooh, that is interesting! Well, tits have been known to be carnivorous (they’ll pick meat off bones and they love a good slice of fatty bacon in winter), and they are descended from T.rex. So. You’ve been warned!

  9. says

    It seems to me that the name “bird cherry” was translated from Latin “cerasus avium”, originally meaning the wild type of sweet cherry. Both are native in Britain, but Prunus padus is apparently more common so the meaning shifted. According to Wikipedia, older names include hagberry or hackberry.

    Lumipuna, that’s how iot is in German. “Vogelkirsche” is the wild version of the sweet cherry and this tree is a “Traubenkirsche” (grape cherry)

    ridana

    Fortunately for the bats, if there’s other food available, the tits prefer that and only hunt the bats as needed.

    Now you know why I feed them by the pound in winter. Pure self preservation.

  10. busterggi says

    Lucky for me I get a live show at the feeders in front of my house so I get to see a variety of tits in person.

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