For the UK readership


You guys are having an election? And you’re not electing a narcissistic psychopathic braggart?

You’ll have to tell us Americans how that feels in the comments.

Comments

  1. lucifersbike says

    Well, I’m not dancing in the streets yet, but I’m relieved, and enjoying my schadenfreude at the Tories’ expense. Plus it looks as if UKIP will disappear leaving no more than a nasty smell.

  2. sarah00 says

    I’m avoiding all the coverage. May will win (I’ve accidentally seen some early polls saying she might not but I refuse to believe polls any more) the only questions is by what majority.

    We may not be voting for a narcissistic psychopathic braggart but we are voting for someone who seems to have no soul. She has made me long wistfully for the days of John Major which is not something I ever thought would happen. I’d take his traffic cone hotline over May’s throwing us over an economic cliff any day.

  3. Zmidponk says

    sarah00:

    I’m avoiding all the coverage. May will win (I’ve accidentally seen some early polls saying she might not but I refuse to believe polls any more) the only questions is by what majority.

    We may not be voting for a narcissistic psychopathic braggart but we are voting for someone who seems to have no soul. She has made me long wistfully for the days of John Major which is not something I ever thought would happen. I’d take his traffic cone hotline over May’s throwing us over an economic cliff any day.

    The Tories are likely to get the most seats, but it’s by no means certain they will get the 326 needed to actually win outright. Given that the Lib Dems have explicitly ruled out a coalition with either Labour or the Tories, and it’s incredibly unlikely the SNP will even consider a coalition with the Tories, if a hung parliament is the end result, the only other possibilities are the Tories trying to govern with a minority government (which would be difficult in the extreme, given they’re trying to negotiate Brexit), a hodge-podge coalition of several parties, or the whole election needing to be re-run. Even if the Tories do get an outright win, given that the PM called this election three years early pretty much in order to substantially increase the Tory majority, anything less than a win that does this will hurt her politically – perhaps to the point of it being impossible for her to remain as Tory leader, and therefore Prime Minister.

  4. cartomancer says

    Sadly my constituency of Somerton and Frome has just elected a Tory (admittedly not quite as bad a Tory as the one the poor people next door in North Somerset have had for the last seven years – Jacob Rees-Mogg, MP for the Eighteenth Century). It would appear I have failed to corrupt the local youth sufficiently this time round. Bugger.

    Still, the overall results are looking very promising at this stage. If nothing else the good showing that New Old Labour is putting up will help to make everyone sit up and take note that there is a real hunger for progressive policies in this country. Jerry Cornelius for the win!

    In the meantime, here’s Stewart Lee telling us why we should all vote Conservative…

    http://www.filmsforaction.org/watch/stewart-lees-reasons-to-vote-conservative/

  5. jrkrideau says

    my constituency of Somerton and Frome has just elected a Tory

    My deepest sympathy. Corruption is a hard path to follow.

    We lost the last election here but at least not to a Conservative. Here in Canada we try not to dignify that party as “Tory”.

    But thank you for the Lee link.

  6. sarah00 says

    cartomancer, Rees-Mogg is North East Somerset. Those of us in North Somerset have the dubious ‘pleasure’ of having disgraced former defence minister Liam Fox as MP. He’s been my MP since before I was able to vote and (I’ve just looked) he still is with yet another increased majority despite being an incompetent buffoon.

  7. KG says

    And you’re not electing a narcissistic psychopathic braggart?

    I wouldn’t be too sure of that. May will have to resign *loud cheers*, but the Tories have got just enough seats to stay in power (at least for now) with support from the nearest thing we have to your religious right (the DUP), and Boris Johnson evidently favours his chances of succeeding her.

  8. fentex says

    Here in Canada we try not to dignify that party as “Tory”.

    That’s a strange thing to write, “Tory” is an insult, using it is not dignifying anyone.

    It literally means ‘thief’ and is an ironic reference to people forced into penury and thieving by the enclosure and clearances acts in Britain’s past.

  9. richardemmanuel says

    It looks like a slight increase in the influence of the fifth estate, as the papers instructed us not to vote for the terrorist sympathising marxist traitor etc etc. (see Daily Mail et al) Quite spectacular msm anti-Corbyn for yonks. And his own party hate him too. The parliamentary ones that is. I expect they quite like him this morning all of a sudden. Interestingly Brexit-neutral overall. Let’s have another one, that was a draw. May Kaput.

  10. F.O. says

    “Conservatives confirmed largest party, but the cannot win the majority, hung parliament confirmed”

  11. richardemmanuel says

    Gotta go – minimum wage is calling. We’ve gone even bluer here – 48.6%. How my colleagues laughed at The Sun’s witty Cor-bin front page yesterday. Then learned they were no longer being paid for breaks. Then voted blue. I didn’t say we were clever.

  12. Alt-X says

    So happy to hear this news. Good on ya UK! With the US regressing, UK, Germany, France and Australia can take over and drive world progress forward.

  13. davem says

    If we can use this to reverse Brexit, the nightmare will be over. Short of that, we’re still fucked. The aspiring alternatives to Theresa May are pretty awful

  14. themartic says

    If you’re looking for progress or leadership from Australia you may have to wait a while – our next election is May 2019

  15. Rich Woods says

    I wouldn’t have thought I’d be so happy to see a hung Parliament. I got up early to get the results and couldn’t stop grinning at the news. May is toast. Boris will be sharpening his dagger in readiness.

    There are few things as enjoyable as Tory party in-fighting. Watching them elect another incompetent is great fun.

  16. Rich Woods says

    @davem 17:

    Unfortunately I don’t think there’s much chance of reversing Brexit, but at least there’s a better chance of avoiding as much of an economic crash as the Maybot seemed set on imposing upon us.

  17. ajbjasus says

    #2 -lucifersbike

    UKIP may well disappear but they have left a damn sight more than a nasty smell.

  18. call me mark says

    Tories climbing into bed with the DUP makes the accusations of “terrorist sympathiser” thrown at Corbyn look a bit hollow.

  19. WrathPanda says

    It certainly went a bit better than I was expecting (though not quite as good as I was hoping). My own constituency also had the dubious pleasure of George Galloway running after the death of Gerald Kaufman. He came third with 2,615 votes. First place went to Labour (No surprise. It’s one of the safest seats in the country) with 35,085 votes. I’m awaiting the reaction from the alt-right that we’ve just voted in a Muslim. For reference the kippers came 6th with 952 votes.

  20. opposablethumbs says

    It feels very good – like hope is no longer unthinkable. Weakening the tory grip on the UK will be good for our chances of avoiding the disaster of an ultra-hard brexit, and good for having at least the hope of avoiding the worst tory excesses domestically.
    And irrespective of immediate developments, it has helped significantly with moving the Overton Window back leftwards; helping to make it thinkable and speakable to question and counter the political doctrine of austerity.

  21. cartomancer says

    Well, that wasn’t entirely unpleasant.

    I mean, I’m flabbergasted at how half the country are still willing to vote Tory, after seven years of austerity, the disaster that was Brexit, Michael Fucking Gove on Education, Jeremy Hunt (sic) trying to dismantle the NHS, Boris’s buffoonery, IDS on shafting pensioners and Theresa May on shafting asylum seekers and the Police. But sadly there are still a lot of crusty old Little Englanders, economic illiterates and dupes of the Murdochracy in this country.

    As for what happens now… very difficult to say. But it’s certainly going to be better than it would have been had May achieved a parliamentary majority or, even worse, increased the slim one she had in the first place. Even if it only makes the Tories shrink back from their austerity programmes for fear of becoming even more unpopular it will have done us a sterling service. One can only hope for a coordinated front from the newly resurgent Left and to let the inevitable Tory backstabbing tarnish their brand even further.

  22. davidc1 says

    As an English man i would like to know just what Scotland is on electing so many tory MPs ,Labour increased its number of MPs ,even took seats off the tories that they have held for 100 years .

  23. KG says

    Cross-posted from Discuss: Political Madness (where I have made earlier comments on the UK election):

    May is intent (*quack* *limp*) on staying in office (*limp* *quack*) with the support of the DUP – fundy Ulster Protestant bigots, basically – who she is now calling (*quack* *limp*) “our friends in the DUP”. Not an actual coalition, but the DUP will vote for her in a confidence motion. Of course, every vote for this motion (“This House has confidence in Her Majesty’s Government”) will be a lie, including May’s own. Nobody believes May will last long, although it’s possible a minority Tory administration will keep going, doing very little apart from trying to push Brexit to a conclusion, and handing out fiscal and political bribes to the DUP. The political bribes could threaten the peace process in northern Ireland, which depends on the UK government appearing to be neutral between Unionists and Nationalists – but hey, what does that signify when it’s a matter of keeping the Tories in office?

    I must admit I hadn’t paid much attention to the Tory manifesto but there are some interesting points I can’t now see them trying to push through. One is a repeal of the Fixed Term Parliaments Act – which was supposed to prevent the PM calling an election whenever they wished, but completely failed at its first test – I suppose in case a future opposition has the gumption not to simply agree to whatever date the PM wants. There are a number of other measures listed at the link which would be formulated to give the Tories an electoral advantage in future elections, and which they may also have to put on the back burner. But the really big one is promising to leave the EU single market and customs union as part of Brexit. It’s by no means obvious either the DUP. or all their own MPs, will support that.

    Corbyn is pretending he has some chance of forming a minority government. I’m not sure why – he has no chance at all of doing so – but in the light of his recent performance, maybe he knows what he’s doing in terms of political strategy.

  24. KG says

    As an English man i would like to know just what Scotland is on electing so many tory MPs – davidc@30

    Well I wish we hadn’t, but I would point out that there are 13 Tory MPs out of 59 in Scotland, and at least 296* out of 433 in England. If it was up to Scotland, there wouldn’t have been a Tory government since 1964.

    *Not counting the Speaker (who doesn’t vote in Commons divisions), or the possible additional seat in Kensington, not yet decided.

  25. cartomancer says

    KG, #31

    It seems to me that Corbyn is keeping his options open by refusing to rule out the possibility of forming a minority government. I expect he doesn’t want to say anything now that he would regret in future if the situation changes. Probably he has an eye on any future elections that may happen when the May bandwagon finally gives up the ghost and collapses – he wants to project the sentiment that Labour is a credible party of governance as hard as possible.

    As for the DUP… they’re a very peculiar card in all of this. They’re significantly to the left of the Tories on economic issues, which would make their support on anything but their pet projects of unionism, homophobia and social regress very uncertain. Given recent upsets to Northern Irish government following the energy remissions scandal they’re not exactly in a strong position at home either, despite their extra seats at Westminster (Sinn Fein also gained a few). They’re perhaps the most rabidly anti-European party of all in British politics now, though, with the annihilation of UKIP, so having them on hand for the Brexit negotiations is just asking for trouble.

  26. richardemmanuel says

    ‘Saved’ by Paddy Power and a kick-boxing lesbian. They’ll get on famously. No reds voted blue north against Yes yellow. All looks strong and stable, and ready to conquer europe. Blue on blue will be fun…

  27. jazzlet says

    @ Cartomancer but it’s not half the country voting Tory is it? Here in Hazel Grove (Stockport) 54% voted for the LibDems, Labour or the Greens. I am pissed off bcausse I held my nose and voted LibDem and too few others did, Labour got over 9,000 vote, put them with the 14,500 LibDem votes and the Tories would have lost by 3,500 votes. Feel dirty for nothing now.

  28. blf says

    Having the DUP in “government” will seriously challenge the situation in N.Ireland, as it explodes the polite fiction the N.Ireland Office is a neutral party.

    Looking at the current Grauniad live blog, I (now) see several people have already pointed this out. One example, Tory deal with DUP could jeopardise peace process, says Blair’s former chief of staff (16:13 mark):

    […] Jonathan Powell, who as Tony Blair’s chief of staff played a major role in facilitating the Northern Ireland peace process, both before and after the Good Friday agreement, said it would be a mistake for Theresa May to do a deal with the DUP. He explained.

    I do think it’s a mistake to go into government with the “support of our friends” in the DUP. Even John Major avoided doing that and the reason he avoided that is the peace process is based on a balance that the British government has made it clear it is neutral in Northern Ireland, it doesn’t take sides. Once you have their support you are no longer neutral.

    It matters for two big reasons. First, we haven’t managed to get the executive back up and running in Northern Ireland because of divisions between the two sides. The British government were trying to mediate between the two sides to get an administration up and running again and of course now it can’t possibly have that role of mediating.

    And secondly I think it’s a mistake because one of the big issues in the Brexit negotiations is the border between north and south. Now the DUP is a minority in its view about Brexit, it’s in favour of Brexit. This is going to be a very real problem.

    Whatever you put on a piece of paper, you’re living there with a minority government, that’s dependant on the DUP, you get to a crucial issue and then they say, ‘Remember what we want in terms of talks in Northern Ireland’, and the government has a choice: do they say, ‘We’re not giving you let, we’ll let the government collapse’, or do they just bend a little on that issue, it’s just one small issue it doesn’t matter. But beyond that the government can’t possibly be seen as neutral on Northern Ireland now if it puts itself at the mercy of the DUP.

    In addition to the pro-Brexit silliness of the DUP (contrary to how the area voted in the referendum (N.Ireland c.56% to remain)), it comes with numerous other (often-)nutty ideas, From climate denial to abortion: six DUP stances you should know about. They are already licking their chops at the stranglehold they look set to be able to exert, DUP leader vows to help bring stability to UK with Conservatives (stablity — SNORT!).

    (Posted bind due to still not-working “Preview”.)

  29. blf says

    me@38, For feck’s sake, that should have been stability — SNORT!

    (Also posted blind…)

  30. blf says

    In addition to all the female MPs (see @37), there will also be a record number of LGBTQ MPs:

    Andrew Reynolds, an academic specialising in LGBTQ politics, says there will be a record number of LGBTQ MPs in the Commons.

    […] 45 out LGBTQ MPs in new British House of Commons. 19 Labour, 19 Tories and 7 SNP. […]

    Ms Mayhems’s new best fiends, the DUP, is notoriously anti-LGBTQ (N.Ireland does not allow same-sex marriage (and also has possibly the most restrictive abortion laws in Europe)).

    (Posted blind…)

  31. cartomancer says

    Jazzlet, #36

    Okay, it’s not quite half, but 42% is still far too high given what the Tories have been doing to us over the last seven years.

    As for the vote on the left being split between Labour and the Lib Dems, well, that’s been a problem for decades. The First Past the Post system we use really is an issue. Here in Somerton and Frome the combined Lib Dem and Labour vote wouldn’t quite equal the Tory vote, but in the past hardly anyone voted Labour round here and now they’re getting about two thirds of what the Lib Dems do.

    I would say that the solution is for Labour and the Lib Dems to formally merge – as the Liberals and Social Democrats did in the 80s to form the Lib Dems in the first place. But I am very wary of two-party systems like the US, and feel it would be a good thing if we had several parties to choose from on both sides of the spectrum. But the Tories seem secure in their slimy oubliette on the right now that UKIP have dissolved, so until there are serious splits on the right it seems counter-productive to split the vote in this way.

  32. richardemmanuel says

    Nonsense, FPTP is magnificent. And now we are to be run by the ghost of Ian Paisley. Just as the voters intended. The people have spoken.

  33. says

    For Americans with slightly longer memories and slightly more cynical bents, this is as if the 2000 election had been thrown into the House of Representatives, and W had been forced to seek alliance not with the national “third place” candidate, but with Pat Buchanan because he held the balance of power in an otherwise-deadlocked state (since state delegations in the event of Electoral College failure vote together, all-or-none).

    But worse: Pat Buchanan was only a staff speechwriter for Nixon (not Sam on iThe West Wing, but one of Sam’s minions trusted to do first drafts of parts of speeches and provide notes), not in a leadership position. The current leadership of the DUP delegation was… more centrally involved in matters in Northern Ireland.

  34. KG says

    Theresa May’s friends:

    The DUP are pro-union (not Europe but UK), pro-Brexit and socially conservative.

    The party, which returned 10 MPs to Westminster, has garnered a reputation for its strong, sometimes controversial views.

    It opposes same-sex marriage and is anti-abortion – abortion remains illegal in Northern Ireland, except in specific medical cases.

    One MP is a devout climate change denier, while a former MP once called for creationism – the belief that human life did not evolve over millions of years but was created by God – to be taught alongside evolution in science classes.

    During the election campaign, the DUP’s Emma Little-Pengelly was endorsed by the three biggest loyalist paramilitary organisations.

  35. KG says

    It seems to me that Corbyn is keeping his options open by refusing to rule out the possibility of forming a minority government. I expect he doesn’t want to say anything now that he would regret in future if the situation changes. Probably he has an eye on any future elections that may happen when the May bandwagon finally gives up the ghost and collapses – he wants to project the sentiment that Labour is a credible party of governance as hard as possible. – cartomancer@34

    Yes, that’s plausible. I suppose a Tory split (hard or soft Brexit?) is at least a remote possibility.

  36. blf says

    Snarks dead ahead, The PM is like a deadbeat dad who’s gambled away the housekeeping:

    And then solemnly explains to the kids that only he can deliver the strength and stability they need

    […] Despite helming a campaign with more suspiciously unforced errors than the first round of a tennis grand slam, […] Prime Minister May has no intention of resigning. Is this a bit like when she had no intention of calling an election? […]

    [… B]efore the day is out, most of the political class are to be forcibly tattooed — choice of our foreheads or the arses we talk out of — with William Goldman’s famous dictum about Hollywood: Nobody knows anything. I mean, really. Really. With a few notable exceptions, there are uncontacted Amazon tribes with more of a clue […]

    […]

    The other death in the family is May’s stronger hand shtick. This was the notion, shat on by several game theorists over the age of seven, that the size of May’s victory would strengthen her negotiating position in Brussels. She has revealed herself to be a poker player with skills and cunning roughly analogous to those of Homer Simpson, who is dealt four jacks and cocks it all up by dancing round the room.

    Yet May remains mesmerically unable to pivot. Having destabilised everything with an election she called unnecessarily — and having done so on a stability platform — her genuine verdict was that the country needs a period of stability. You what, madam? […]

    As for those against whom she sought the “stronger hand”, the Europeans with whom we begin Brexit negotiations in 10 — yes, 10! — days, they are the soul of discretion. According to the chief EU negotiator, Michael Barnier: “Brexit negotiations should start when the UK is ready.” And I think we know that “when the UK is ready” is diplomatic-speak for “when the UK is at least housebroken”. It’s all very well history repeating itself as farce, but when farce is repeating itself as farce, any comment feels like intruding on private grief. Or as the Germans preferred to put it, they wouldn’t be commenting on the results “out of respect and politeness”.

    […]

    About the only thing missing is Yakety Sax (the Benny Hill theme).

    (Posted blind…)

  37. blf says

    his own party hate him [Corbyn] too. The parliamentary ones that is. I expect they quite like him this morning all of a sudden

    Yep, https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/jun/09/jeremy-corbyn-plans-alternative-queens-speech-challenging-may:

    […]
    Owen Smith, who lost a leadership challenge against Corbyn, said: “I was clearly wrong in feeling that Jeremy was unable to do this well and I think he’s proved me wrong and lots of people wrong and I take my hat off to him.”

    When asked whether it was Corbyn’s or Labour’s policies that won the election, he said: “It has to be both. I don’t know what Jeremy’s got but if we could bottle it and drink it we’d all be doing very well.

    “We were hearing people who hadn’t voted for a long while voting Labour yesterday evening, who were inspired by the policies — and, it has to be said, by Jeremy — to vote Labour last night.”

    In a sign that Corbyn’s opponents were adjusting their view of his leadership, Wes Streeting, who has been one of his strongest critics in parliament, said Corbyn had shone in the campaign. […]

    And so on.

    (Posted blind due to still not-working “Preview”.)

  38. EigenSprocketUK says

    #42+42 Cartomancer+richardemmanuel. First Past The Post is an undemocratic disgrace.
    Takes deep breath
    Because of the reluctance of a sizeable chunk of Scotland to vote for the Tory alternative which would have led inevitably towards a second independence referendum for Scotland and the almost-inevitable breakup of the UK, the Tories snatched away sufficient SNP seats in Scotland giving them just enough numbers to toddle down to Buckingham palace to see the Queen about forming a regressive government propped up by Creationist bigots in Northern Ireland who now get to call the shots on their soapboxes stuffed full of pet bigotry even though the DUP have the mostly religously-born partisan support of less than 300,000 people which pales into insignificance when compared to, say, the 525,000 people across the whole of the UK who voted green yet only scored one MP leaving the 495,000 Green voters who don’t live in the centre of Brighton with no MPs at all, no-one really in a position to champion their issues, and therefore only a smug inner feeling of satisfaction that they made a pyrrhic point.
    runs out of breath and slams pint down on table as though I’ve just made an important point,/i>
    Yeh, so that’s why I hate FPTP.
    Proportional representation is messy, yes. We’d always be dealing with partisan opinions, and some truly yucky ones like UKIP once were before they infected patient zero in the Tory party and went mainstream. But at least we would be treating partisan opinions all alike and with due weight instead of some lucky bigots in Northern Ireland holding undue influence for the next term or so.
    finishes pint, looks around, but everyone’s gone home to fix FTB preview

  39. leophoreo says

    don’t know how to quote but:
    WrathPanda
    9 June 2017 at 6:52 am
    It certainly went a bit better than I was expecting (though not quite as good as I was hoping). My own constituency also had the dubious pleasure of George Galloway running after the death of Gerald Kaufman. He came third with 2,615 votes. First place went to Labour (No surprise. It’s one of the safest seats in the country) with 35,085 votes. I’m awaiting the reaction from the alt-right that we’ve just voted in a Muslim. For reference the kippers came 6th with 952 votes.

    I had the dubious pleasure of having the fucker’s office on my street corner, I don’t think I’ve told so many people to “fuck off” for such a prolonged period.

  40. blf says

    leophoreo@50, Like this:

      <blockquote>text…</blockquote>

    produces:

    text…

    (Assuming, of course, I haven’t fecked it up — with the current not-working “Preview” it’s difficult to tell…)

  41. leophoreo says

    blf
    9 June 2017 at 4:52 pm
    leophoreo@50, Like this:

    text…

    produces:
    text…
    (Assuming, of course, I haven’t fecked it up — with the current not-working “Preview” it’s difficult to tell…)

    like this then hopefully if I haven’t fucked it up as no preview

  42. KG says

    An interesting fact I haven’t seen talked about yet (although probably I haven’t looked in the right places): the centre and left parties represented in Parliament (Labour, Liberal Democrats, SNP, Plaid Cymru, Greens*) between them got 52.8% of the vote. Thie Tory/DUP regime in preparation has no popular mandate – it is demoratically illegitimate even though it narrowly won the election and so it will undoubtedly be the legal government – very like Trump, but even more convincingly so, because the centre and left parties’ votes . Now is the time for a “Broad Popular Front”! The Labour Party, with Corbyn at its head, has established its right to lead that broad anti-Tory coalition, but it would have to accept that it is not strong enough to defeat the Tories alone, and in practical terms, accept electoral reform.

    *Strictly speaking the Greens are three allied parties (England and Wales, Scotland, northern Ireland), and only the E&W Greens are represented (by the admirable Caroline Lucas, re-elected MP for Brighton Pavilion with a 15,000+ majority), but excluding votes for the other two Green parties would only cut the total a few tenths of a percent.

  43. KG says

    Sorry – incomplete sentence @ 55. This sentence:

    Thie Tory/DUP regime in preparation has no popular mandate – it is demoratically illegitimate even though it narrowly won the election and so it will undoubtedly be the legal government – very like Trump, but even more convincingly so, because the centre and left parties’ votes .

    should read:

    The Tory/DUP regime in preparation has no popular mandate – it is demoratically illegitimate even though it narrowly won the election and so it will undoubtedly be the legal government – very like Trump, but even more convincingly so, because the centre and left parties’ votes total over 50%.

  44. KG says

    Of course the various anti-Tory forces have deep disagreements, over Brexit, Scottish independence, nuclear weapons … but the next two years are politically vital – if the Tories get their preferred version of Brexit through, post-Brexit UK will combine corporate power with a powerful security state. That must be prevented, by all peaceful* means.

    I should say I’m not optimisitic such a BPF will happen – but the potential for it is there.
    *By peaceful I don’t mean legal – civil disobedience will very likely be needed.

  45. KG says

    Dominic Hinkins@58,
    Did you predict that before it happened?

    #59 Corbyn is now Leader of the Labour Party and Leader of the Opposition in fact as well as in name.

    Labour came second and Corbyn and Labour are the big winners (genuinely – I’m not being sarcastic, but noting the irony). May came first and is the biggest loser. The next biggest loser is the Conservative Party, and after that, the SNP and Nicola Sturgeon, who won an absolute majority of Scottish seats (but lost 21), while the big winners in Scotland are the Scottish Conservatives and leader Ruth Davidson, who came second, 10% behind the SNP. Any scriptwriter who came up with ironies as neat as those would risk being dismissed as fancifull. The Liberal Democrats gained a few seats but only reached 12, from 7% of the vote.

    I’m in a small rival party (the Scottish Greens), and won’t be changing that, but only Corbyn can now head the anti-Tory struggle. He needs to reach out beyond Labour, though, in Parliament and outside. Article 50 gives us the timescale – ubefore 29 March 2019 – within which we have to stop the Tory-DUP project.

  46. blf says

    Author and Chatham House senior fellow Matthew Goodwin vowed to eat his own words if Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour got more than 38% of the vote in the election

    I’m saying this out load. I do not believe that Labour, under Jeremy Corbyn, will poll 38%. I will happily eat my new Brexit book if they do
    [transcribed by hand –blf]

    As the party managed to secure 40%, he went on Sky News this afternoon to tuck in to some pages.

    This man just ate (some of) his book live on Sky News after making an incorrect #GE2017 prediction […]

    From the Graunid’s live blog, 16:55 mark.

  47. richardemmanuel says

    @KG – I think they’ll be kaput long before then if we do nothing. The internal evil will triumph. I’d be impressed with 6 months. How will round 2 go? Now people can see that he can win? What would you say from up there – surely half the yellows are really reds fed up with getting blues?

  48. KG says

    richardemmanuel@62,

    I’d be impressed with 6 months. How will round 2 go? Now people can see that he can win?

    Given that I was quite wrong about the election outcome, I’m hesitant to predict! But the Tories will be desperate to hang on until the Brexit terms (or lack of terms) are settled – their aim is to remove any possible constraints on the corporate/security-state agenda as the UK leaves the EU. OTOH, the initiative in UK politics is now undeniably with Corbyn – twerps like Chris Leslie (see ck@63) notwithstanding. And suddenly it’s the Tories saddled with a hopeless leader most of their MPs want rid of.

    What would you say from up there – surely half the yellows are really reds fed up with getting blues?

    To some extent – there was a poll indicating that in the event of a Tory win, 30% of Scots would be more likely to back independence. But this “Tory win” won’t do that, because there’s an obvious possibility that it won’t last. The widespread desire for independence isn’t going to go away, but the SNP and broader independence movement need to recognise independence is not coming before Brexit, and focus on maximising the powers that come to Holyrood (Scottish Parliament) rather than Westminster when it happens. Remainers, in Scotland and elsewhere, need to recognise that Brexit is almost certainly going to happen, and focus on keeping as many links as possible (single market, customs union, ECHR…) – with, even, the possibility of rejoining at some stage. (I’m pro-independence and voted Remain, but political realities must be faced.)

    On the subject of Scotland, Ruth Davidson, the Scottish Tory leader, has been asserting her independence, querying the pact with the Fundies (Davidson is engaged to a woman), and indicating that she will push for a softer Brexit. Of course there will be many Tory MPs across Britain, and many of their business backers, wanting the same.

  49. KG says

    Further to #64 and Scotland, although the election dealt a serious blow to the independence movement, it emphasised once again the differences between Scottish and English politics. In the longer term, those differences will keep the independence issue alive.

  50. says

    KG@60, yeah, I’ve been telling people for weeks it was the likely outcome. Couldn’t understand the polling and media – they totally underestimated the youth vote. It was clear from the point record numbers registered to vote.

  51. richardemmanuel says

    I think there’s an awful lot of people fed up with their votes not counting, and the simplest trick to get a one-off ‘lending’ of votes would be for JC to tack on PR as a PS. But I’ll be surprised if he’s not in by Christmas anyway. I think much earlier really.

  52. KG says

    It was clear from the point record numbers registered to vote. – Dominic Hinkins@66

    Good point. I admit, I was pessimistic when I learned that the polls showing a close result were relying on a high youth turnout – but I’m delighted the youth proved me wrong!

  53. KG says

    richardemmanuel@67,

    Are you expecting another election, or the Tories losing a confidence vote, and Corbyn subsequently winning one? (I can’t think of any other possibilities, other than a revoltioin that would put Corbyn in.) Both another election and Tory-failure + Labour-success in coinfidence votes are both possible, but I don’t think either is likely – by Christimas, at least.

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