Only the “right kind” of Christians need apply inside


We already have a de facto requirement for politicians to be religious, as in Judeo-Christian, where Mormons-sorta-count as long as they’re ultra-wealthy conservatives running against non-conservatives. An Oklahoma company has taken it one pseudo-logical step further. Not only do you have to be a Christian to work there, you better be the right kind of born-again evangelical:

Yahoo News– In the complaint filed against Voss by the EEOC, Wolfe says he saw the position on a church website. His first interview went well, but in a second interview with the branch manager, he told lawyers, he was questioned about his religious practices and beliefs. According to the complaint, the manager asked Wolfe “to identify every church he has attended over the past several years; where and when [he] was ‘saved’ and the circumstances that led up to it.”

In the interview, Wolfe claims he was told most employees at Voss were Southern Baptist, but employees could go to any church, as long as they were “born again.”

The complaint claims the manager asked Wolfe if he would “have a problem” coming to work early, without pay, to attend Bible study.

Using the same tortured logic, I don’t care what my secretary looks like, as long as she has a nice butt and big green eyes …

This is for a store that sells lights. Not a church, not a Christian bookstore or new media manager for a religious think-tank, a lighting store. And I would have a problem coming in early without pay to take a nap, let alone for Bible study.

I wonder how this would go over among the usual suspects if the requirement was you had to be a Sunni Muslim or Scientologist — or God-eh forbid, an atheist — and have to come in early without pay to spread the good word of the prophet Mohammed or Hubbard? Ahh, who am I kididng, we know exactly how that would go over. We’d be treated to wailing cries from the always oppressed super-majority of ‘you can never take our Freeeeeedom …’

Comments

  1. a miasma of incandescent plasma says

    …the manager asked Wolfe “to identify every church he has attended over the past several years; where and when [he] was ‘saved’ and the circumstances that led up to it.”

    In the interview, Wolfe claims he was told most employees at Voss were Southern Baptist, but employees could go to any church, as long as they were “born again.”

    So if he could go to any church why was the manager asking for an essay on the specific churches?

    Isn’t born again title only available to certain sects? Is there such a thing as a born-again Catholic? I’m going to guess that the answer to that question will be different for each of the 30,000+ Christian sects out there.

    Ah, the all-knowing all-loving, all-very-clear-guidance-and-communication from the maker of the universe.

  2. hexidecima says

    always nice to see that the oft-prated kumbaya nonsense spread by Christians about how well they love each other is exactly that, nonsense that is essentially a lie.

  3. says

    Biblically speaking, Christians shouldn’t sue other Christians.

    1 Corinthians 6:1 Dare any of you, having a matter against another, go to law before the unjust, and not before the saints? 2 Do ye not know that the saints shall judge the world? and if the world shall be judged by you, are ye unworthy to judge the smallest matters? 3 Know ye not that we shall judge angels? how much more things that pertain to this life? 4 If then ye have judgments of things pertaining to this life, set them to judge who are least esteemed in the church. 5 I speak to your shame. Is it so, that there is not a wise man among you? no, not one that shall be able to judge between his brethren?

    And Jesus’ (alleged) own words.
    Matthew 5:40 — And if any man will sue thee at the law, and take away thy coat, let him have thy cloak also.

    Funny, though. The courts seem to be chock full of Christians suing other Christians.

    How many employees does this place have? I thought Title VII was enforceable for any employer with more than 15 employees.

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