Uh-oh, it’s snowing


We also have a chance of a blizzard tonight. This is going to limit my mobility even more, I’m afraid, and it’s going to kill more spiders. Scurry deep into the leaf litter, little ones, hide under the rocks, you’re also welcome to move into my house.

Right now it’s pretty and expected. I wonder how long it’ll be until I’m shaking my fist out the window and cussing out the snow?

Comments

  1. Akira MacKenzie says

    It’s been off-and-on rain for most of the day down here in the Milwaukee area. There was a chance of snow for tomorrow, but the weather prognosticators seem to have removed that from the forecast until Sunday.

  2. davidc1 says

    Poor Doc ,this might cheer you up some ,a guy tried to run down a snowman in his “,Oooh what a big truck I have” .
    Turns out they had built the snowman around a dirty great big tree stump ,that will learn him .

  3. Nerd of Redhead, Dances OM Trolls says

    I saw the first report of possible snow in the Chicago Tribune today, but it seemed like snow was more likely for outlaying areas (away from Lake Michigan) this weekend rather than in the city. Any snowfall won’t stick around for very long.

  4. gddiver says

    Well Doc, you could always move back home. It’s a balmy 50 here in Seattle and no worries about skin cancer with our soothing grey skies and gentle rain from now until April or May, possibly June. We’re sure to have sunshine by July though, at least we should.

  5. Ed Seedhouse says

    We do have snow on the higher hillocks around here, but not on the tiny ones visible from downtown Victoria B.C. Lots of snow on the actual mountains across the Straight in the Olympic ranges in Washington though.

    Mount Brenton about 40 miles north of us here holds one of the VHF repeaters we hams use, at about 1000 meters and the snow you will see on the webcam (http://cvars.com/camera2.html) is hiding the entire road – won’t get plowed until spring, now.

  6. azpaul3 says

    I wonder how long it’ll be until I’m shaking my fist out the window and cussing out the snow?

    I would guess about 15 minutes.

  7. JoeBuddha says

    Here in the North Wet, we’re getting a pineapple express, meaning we’re getting all of the rain we should have gotten in the summer as well as the rain we get in the fall, with temps rising and snow melting. It’s gonna be miserable for the next week or two.

  8. says

    I was up too late and my weekday alarm goes off at 9:20. I ignored it and lay in bed. Sun never happened, not a ray. By the time I stirred again it was after noon. PNW living up to the legend for a change. Vampires will not sparkle.

  9. VolcanoMan says

    Yup. Not too far away from Morris in what had been (up until Tuesday) unseasonably-warm Winterpeg, but we’re now living up to that moniker. I am grateful that it took this long to snow though; permanent snowfall usually happens around now, but in most years there is some temporary snowfall in October (including a memorable Thanksgiving weekend with ~25 cm back in 2019 that took a couple weeks to melt)…and in my childhood, there was sometimes temporary snow as early as late September. I can live with Remembrance Day snowstorms. I just wish it got colder, so it stopped being wet and heavy, and started in on dry and fluffy territory. Much easier to shovel.

  10. says

    “I wonder how long it’ll be until I’m shaking my fist out the window and cussing out the snow?”
    Only takes about 3.5 minutes for me. Snow=public transportation. I hate public transportation.

  11. birgerjohansson says

    A decent snow cover prevents the cold from seeping deep into the ground, and helps small animals survive in burrows.

  12. John Morales says

    birgerjohansson:

    A decent snow cover prevents the cold from seeping deep into the ground, and helps small animals survive in burrows.

    If it’s cold enough for snow to fall, it’s pretty damn cold already!

    (I’m so glad I live where it doesn’t snow, at all)

  13. larrylyons says

    Snow in Minnesota with a bit of cold weather. What do you expect Florida? At least look at it this way, you’r enot in Winnipeg.

  14. birgerjohansson says

    Bears usually dig their way into the base of big anthills, and once snow has covered the opening, they can hibernate, relying on the oxygen that gets through the porous snow cover. If carbon dioxide gets too high, they wake up and can enlarge the opening to their den.

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