Carnivalia, and an open thread


These are some carnivals of science—read about invertebrates, genes, or genetics this morning.

Comments

  1. RP pedestrian says

    The carnivalia are wonderful, and scienceblogs is like a permanent science arcade.

    I thought of this blog (or was it, um, some other guy’s?) when I saw The Economist’s latest foray into paleontology. It looks better than average for them.

    With only an Intro to Paleo class, and, from what I can gather, a rather poor one at that, I couldn’t say for sure, but I’m thinking the findings about carbonic anhydrase published in Science look pretty interesting for evolutionary biology and portend further dismay to the ID movement. Carbonic anhydrase, so important in many physiological processes today, or its precursors, may have set off the Cambrian explosion. If so, you’ve got to love the one-two punch. The findings deliver a knockout blow to spurious claims of a sudden Cambrian “creation” of complex life forms. They deliver another crippling blow in the form of strong evidence that the last common ancestor of the metazoans had genes which can be traced through the shelled organisms to modern humans, serving different functions along the way.

  2. Reginald Selkirk says

    Debate evolves into religious discussion

    (Sam Brownback:) “One of the problems we have with our society today is that we’ve put faith and science at odds with each other. They aren’t at odds with each other. If they are, check your faith, or check your science.”

    The science has been checked very carefully and repeatedly. As for your faith, you can check it at the door.