Religious sentiments – an excuse for cold blooded murder ?


Yet another bizarre judgement from an Indian court.

A Hindu mob went on a rampage in Pune in June 2014 and assaulted many Muslims on the road. Mohsin Sadiq Shaikh, a 24-year-old from Solapur district, who worked as an IT manager with a private firm in Pune was brutally beaten to death.

Image Credit - DNA

Image Credit – DNA

Murderers were arrested and the local court refused them bail. They approached High Court in Mumbai. The Judge in the High Court granted them bail saying this.

The meeting was held prior to the incident of assault. The accused, otherwise, had no other motive, such as any personal enmity, against the innocent deceased. The only fault of the deceased was that he belonged to another religion. I consider this factor in favour of the accused. Moreover, the accused do not have any criminal record and it appears that they were provoked in the name of the religion and have committed murder,

On June 2, 2014, a meeting of the right wing outfit Hindu Rashtra Sena (HRS) was conducted at Hadapsar, Pune, on account of the alleged defiling of a statue of King Shivaji Maharaj. According to the complaint, one of the co-accused, Dhananjay Desai, had allegedly given instigating speeches at the meet. Following the meeting, the three accused, along with Desai, started roaming around in the area on two wheelers, armed with weapons.

A High Court Judge is saying if some one killed an innocent stranger because he belongs to another religion, the crime becomes an offence of less magnitude and is bailable !

Religion an excuse for cold blooded murder ?

What a shame !

Comments

  1. agender says

    This court should get thanked for being outspoken.
    In christianized countries something that blatant was no longer written since the witchburnings.
    The European witchburners divided their murders between various legal systems and court proceedings; and the apologists, legal and otherwise, still jump at the ideas and phrases invented back then. (1485 – 1862 common era)

Comments welcome