Baghdad Bob is alive and well and living in Seattle »« In case you ever doubted that Dr Oz was a quack…

Comments

  1. pHred says

    Wow. What a joyful event it is. Which just makes what happened yesterday all the more horrible and infuriating. The rest of my thoughts are such jumble they can’t even be expressed.

  2. bbgunn says

    And from watching the numerous videos, scores of those same volunteers ran toward the explosions to provide assistance. (Just in case anyone needed an additional reason to admire the good and sundry folks of Boston.)

  3. FossilFishy(Anti-Vulcanist) says

    Yesterday almost seven billion people lived their lives without being murdered.

    The evil fucks who rend and maim don’t just kill individuals, they also kill our ability to see the world as it is. The horror of these events gets fixed in the mind; it pushes out the quiet everyday facts* of our existance. All those tiny kindness in our daily lives, each one too small to stick in the memory don’t stand a chance against the big horrors. Not unless we actively seek them out as our lives pass by. Not unless we then tend to those memories with all the care we’d put to anything so fragile and valuable.

    Yesterday almost seven billion people lived their lives without murdering anyone.

    Dave’s perspective should not be unexpected.

    * Or at least the facts for those of us lucky enough to live in places where democracy and the rule of law still work.

  4. says

    I just keep thinking tea party, Boston, tax day. I have little doubt this was domestic, pure speculation I know, but I’ll be surprised if we find out this was foreign.

    I liked this guy’s post and admire his wish to find the silver lining and concentrate on the positive, but it struck me as a little self centered to talk about what a geat experience he had and not even mention the victims.

  5. Usernames are smart says

    Very inspiring! Thanks for finding that.

    I saw a comment the other day that is a good reminder of how to react when this sort of thing happens again:

    Remember that the level of accuracy in news reports is near-zero right after a catastrophic event. Over time that level will grow. It will never reach 100%.

    What: two explosions killed 3(?) people and injured “n” others
    Where: explosion #1 in front of the library near the finish line; #2 on Boylston Street between the Lennox and Mandarin hotels
    When: around 1450 EDT(?)
    How: ?
    Who: ?
    Why: ?

  6. Trebuchet says

    Munger’s post gave me goose bumps. That doesn’t happen often any more. The bomber has already lost.

  7. Pteryxx says

    I liked this guy’s post and admire his wish to find the silver lining and concentrate on the positive, but it struck me as a little self centered to talk about what a geat experience he had and not even mention the victims.

    That post was about the victims. It’s about who they were, what they came to be part of, and what they were doing and would have gone right on doing if they hadn’t had explosions go off in their midst. Before that, they were just like everyone else; the author could very well have become one.

    It’s just not about these specific victims; but that’ll come, very shortly. Right now they’re a bit busy.

  8. says

    Here’s a roundup of some of the major bombings in the US in the last 20 years:
    1993 attack on the World Trade Center
    1994 Unabomber
    1995 Oklahoma City bombing
    1996 pipe bombs at the Olympics in Atlanta
    1998 bomb at an Alabama abortion clinic
    2000 arson attack at a Syracuse temple
    2001 9/11 attack on WTC, using planes as bombs
    2002 18 pipe bombs planted in mailboxes in five states
    2008 bomb planted in front of a military recruiting center in Times Square
    2008 bomb at a San Diego courthouse
    2008 fire bombs aimed to harm researchers UC Santa Cruz
    2011 bombing of an MLK parade in Spokane was thwarted by police

    What one dust-for-brains Republican congress critter said about the Boston bombing: “[a] person of interest is in custody.” [incorrect]

    “We’ve been quite fortunate that this type of attack has not happened before in the U.S.” [incorrect] — Rep. Michael McCaul (R-Texas), chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee

  9. pHred says

    What Pteryxx said – that whole post was about the victims – about what the &*^&$*^*&$%& bomber targeted. About who and what the bomber hurt.

    @4 you apparently totally missed the point.

  10. WharGarbl says

    Worth repeating here.

    When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, “Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.” – Fred Rogers

  11. Moggie says

    erikthebassist:

    I just keep thinking tea party, Boston, tax day. I have little doubt this was domestic, pure speculation I know, but I’ll be surprised if we find out this was foreign.

    This is not the thread for such speculation.

    I liked this guy’s post and admire his wish to find the silver lining and concentrate on the positive, but it struck me as a little self centered to talk about what a geat experience he had and not even mention the victims.

    What a ridiculous misreading of his post.

    Look, there’s no shortage of media coverage of the victims: in full colour and graphic detail, if that’s what you want. He chose instead to focus on the positive aspects of ordinary Bostonians, their generosity of spirit, spirit which he hopes will not be defeated by terrorists. How hard is this to understand?

  12. says

    Pteryxx and pHred,

    I guess it’s all in how we individually cope and mourn. I tend to stay angry and think about the people who were injured and killed or were present during the event or there to see the aftermath.

    I was going to go on about how I think this is pointless fluff right now, but I won’t. It’s not about me or my opinion of this piece. It’s about the victims and the tragedy. So I’ll just shut up.

  13. Pteryxx says

    From the essay:

    Marathon day in Boston is one of the warmest and most heartfelt holidays and events that I have ever been a part of. Someone tried to take that away from the people of Boston yesterday, but I don’t think they succeeded. They only gave Boston another chance to show how generous and brave its people are. While I am horrified by the events that occurred yesterday, I’m glad to have had the chance to see so many people at their best.

    He chose to focus on the volunteers and cheering spectators, and the overall warm atmosphere, and a bit on how people continued helping each other after news of the bombing spread, as a tribute and a recognition to go on with. Also because that’s what he directly witnessed. It’s about the humanity of the community there. That’s only one facet, an under-recognized one in the greater Internet and news cycle; there’s no shortage of stories about the victims as victims, or the tragedy as a tragedy. There’s a place for some guy who was there to write about the context in which this tragedy happened.

    For instance, this is what Salon’s front page looks like at the moment:

    Latest from Boston

    LIVEBLOG: New footage of the first bomb VIDEO

    -

    Will gun bill die while we mourn Boston?

    Mile 26 of the tragic Boston Marathon was dedicated to the 26 victims of Newtown. Now their families may lose again

    -

    Beating Boston conspiracy theorists at their own game

    The Boston Marathon Truthers will have to find another URL, the site’s creator tells Salon

    -

    The Boston bombing privacy lesson

    The surveillance state thrives on acts of terror. All the more reason why we need more protections for our rights

    -

    Newspapers dedicate headlines to Boston explosion

    Headlines around the world reflect the collective shock from Monday’s bombings SLIDE SHOW

    -

    Let’s not be terrorized

    We can’t stop people from putting bombs in trash cans. Catch who did, and let’s honor Boston by returning to normal

    -

    How do improvised explosive devices work?

    Two IEDs were detonated in the marathon attacks. An expert explains how they can lead us back to the bomb makers

    -

    Marathon bombs fashioned from pressure cookers

    Investigators reveal the explosive devices were packed with shards of metal, nails and ball bearings

    -

    Steve King: Boston attacks should slow down immigration reform

    “We need to take a look at the big picture,” he said VIDEO

    -

    Boston residents honor memory of slain 8-year old child

    Martin Richard was the youngest casualty of the bombing at the Boston Marathon on Monday

    —–

    I think the point’s been made, yeah.

  14. raven says

    “Someone knows who did this,” DesLauriers said. The agent said the investigation in its “infancy,” and that authorities do not know who is responsible for planting the bombs. He described the case as “wide open.”

    Not good news.

    They still don’t know who did it.

    IIRC, the rule in murder investigations is that if they don’t solve it in a week or two, they probably won’t.

    It’s only been a day. But clearly DHS/FBI have no idea whatsoever who the perpetrators are.

  15. Nerd of Redhead, Dances OM Trolls says

    IIRC, the rule in murder investigations is that if they don’t solve it in a week or two, they probably won’t.

    It’s only been a day. But clearly DHS/FBI have no idea whatsoever who the perpetrators are.

    For something like this, something very small, like getting pulled over for speeding (McVeigh), is likely to be what identifies the terrorists. And it can run the gamut of someone who hates the disruption to their commute the marathon causes, to some gun-rights-liberturd-anti-tax-wackaloons, to foreign terrorists.

  16. says

    Glenn Beck thinks now is good time to buy gold. Of course, you should buy your gold from Glenn Beck so that he make mo’ money.

    The only thing I have to fear is the government, quite frankly. The government lying to you, the media not telling the truth. I mean, gold is the original gold standard, and something doesn’t smell right. Such a currency of last resort that it’s so unstable that the central banks are buying it up.

    Let’s say this turns out to be a terrorist operation with multiple bombs around the city. The stock market tanking, things going awry — wouldn’t this exactly be like how it would happen? September 11, now that we are in this precarious situation, this is the way it will happen — it will happen really, really quickly. You better have a plan and know what you and your family are going to do in the time of more difficult days ahead.

    I think he also wants you to buy preparedness supplies from him, stock up like a mormon.

  17. sosw says

    via BB, Bruce Schneier – Keep Calm and Carry On

    Also check his blog (at schneier.com in case that link doesn’t work; looks weird on preview) for some links to what other people have written that he recommends (or doesn’t).

    The commenters on his blog are also less scary than on most more mainstream sites…

  18. FossilFishy(Anti-Vulcanist) says

    Part of the power of terrorism is the anger that it provokes. That anger can push people into doing rash things, into throwing blame around indiscriminately and causing more harm. By focusing on the fact that the overwhelming majority of humanity are just like the Boston marathon volunteers, decent, kind folks, Dave’s piece is far from being a bit of fluff. It fights back directly against the blinding effects of terrorism, it reminds us to look around and see that the evil fucks are outliers, it puts them in their deserved place as the outcast nadir of humanity.

    And to be clear Erik, I’m not accusing you of blind anger. I’ve read enough of your comments that I would be very surprised indeed if you suddenly started calling for the lynching of all brown people.

  19. Azuma Hazuki says

    Fossil, thank you. This and the previous post were sorely needed, especially when surrounded by a media engine that does nothing but heap fear and sadness on people.

  20. Pteryxx says

    Stories of some of the folks who run towards the booms: (warning for some graphic details at the links)

    Firsthand account from a responder

    I was handed a bag of triage tags. The tags help us know who is level 1, 2, or 3 — who’s priority. I stuck right with the doctor the whole time and did exactly what he asked me to do. At one point I was asked to leave the tent by Boston EMS because I was not in uniform and didn’t have any credentials. The doctor said, “No, this guy’s not going anywhere.”

    Tough Ruck soldiers ran the marathon carrying survival gear

    It took about eight hours for all of the soldiers to cross the finish line, some cruising nearly at a 13-minute mile, others coming in at a little slower pace. They were gathered near the medical tent behind the finish line, waiting for the elite runners to come in. That was the contingency plan in case anything went wrong—meet by the medical tent.

    “You never think you’re gonna need it, but you always have to have a contingency plan,” says Lieutenant Stephen Fiola of the 1060th Transportation Company, who worked with the Military Friends Foundation to organize the march.

    The man in the cowboy hat

    One of the responders in the photograph—the man in the cowboy hat—has been identified as Carlos Arredondo, a Costa Rican immigrant (originally undocumented) whose Marine son died in action in Iraq in 2004.

  21. says

    Here are some sources for the ugliest responses to the Boston bombings:
    http://mediamatters.org/blog/2013/04/16/the-worst-conservative-reactions-to-the-boston/193638

    Excerpt:

    Radio host and noted conspiracy theorist Alex Jones responded to the bombings by suggesting that they may have been a “false flag” operation staged by the government. [image of tweet available at the link.]

    In a special webcast on April 15, Jones expanded on the conspiracy, saying”You saw them stage Fast and Furious. Folks, they staged Aurora, they staged Sandy Hook. The evidence is just overwhelming. And that’s why I’m so desperate and freaked out. This is not fun, you know, getting up here telling you this. Somebody’s got to tell you the truth.”

    http://thinkprogress.org/politics/2013/04/16/1870971/8-worst-boston-responses/
    Excerpt:

    Fox News contributor Erik Rush, RedState, Pamela Geller, and the New York Post all blamed Muslims for the attack. Law enforcement officials say that it “remains too early to establish the cause and motivation” describing it as a “potential terrorist investigation.”

  22. says

    Fox News contributor Erik Rush tweeted:

    “Everybody do the National Security Ankle Grab! Let’s bring more Saudis in without screening them! C’mon! #bostonmarathon.

  23. says

    And to be clear Erik, I’m not accusing you of blind anger. I’ve read enough of your comments that I would be very surprised indeed if you suddenly started calling for the lynching of all brown people.

    No of course not, in fact last night I was flecking spittle at my TV screen because Piers Morgan had several talking heads on, all of whom but one agreed in their expert opinion that this just had to be the work of Al’Quaida.

    The people on face book and reddit that are passing around photos and just looking for brown people with backpacks so they can label them as ‘suspects’ are pissing me right the fuck off too.

  24. Pteryxx says

    One week later: “Whoever came in alive, stayed alive.”

    BOSTON (AP) — In a rebuttal to the terrorists and a tribute to stellar medical care, all of the more than 180 people injured in the Boston Marathon blasts one week ago who made it to a hospital alive now seem likely to survive.

    and that is saying something.

    Three people did die in the blasts, but at the scene, before hospitals even had a chance to try to save them. A Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer who police say was fatally shot Thursday by the suspects was pronounced dead when he arrived at Massachusetts General.

    The only person to reach a hospital alive and then die was one of the suspected bombers — 26-year-old Tamerlan Tsarnaev.

    But the remarkable, universal survival one week later of all others injured in the blasts is a testimonial to fast care at the scene, on the way to hospitals, then in emergency and operating rooms. Everyone played a part, from doctors, nurses and paramedics to strangers who took off belts to use as tourniquets and staunched bleeding with their bare hands.

    earlier:

    “All I feel is joy,” said Dr. George Velmahos, chief of trauma surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital, referring to his hospital’s 31 blast patients. “Whoever came in alive, stayed alive.”

  25. Pteryxx says

    …and this should go here too. From Mike the Mad Biologist, who was present.

    http://mikethemadbiologist.com/2013/04/21/a-personal-eyewitness-perspective-on-mondays-bombings-the-bad-and-the-good-silence-and-solidarity/

    We were left to fend for ourselves. The mayor’s hotline was useless, and no civilian leadership was present. People were shocked and did not know if we could return to our homes–and desperately wanted to return. People who needed medicine, such as insulin, had no idea what to do. We had nothing but the clothes on our backs. A care station half a mile away does not help, especially if you are elderly with medical devices. Several of us stayed with an elderly neighbor with medical conditions late into the night until we made sure she reached a hospital. We should have had help from city leadership (the rank and file BDP and EMS were superb), but we did not, so we did what we could instead.

    In the days that followed, my neighbors and I received no response from any of our elected representatives. You would think this is Rascal King 101: send some ‘heelers down to the affected area and do whatever you can to help. Contact constituents on your mailing and email lists who live in the crime scene perimeter and find out how they are doing. Announce that you or representatives are headed down to the area (or nearby if there are safety concerns) to speak with residents.

    Even though this was the focal point of the attack, the proverbial ‘ground zero’, none of that happened. Nothing.