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Feb 25 2014

We’ve already had this conversation

Exactly. EXACTLY.

Photo: Those who forget the past are doomed to look pretty stupid later.

Via George Takei on Facebook.

5 comments

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  1. 1
    Marcus Ranum

    Takei brings the awesome.

  2. 2
    left0ver1under

    Ah yes, Arizona, the state that rescinded Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

  3. 3
    Al Dente

    Agree with Marcus Ranum @1.

  4. 4
    Peter Hilton

    Thank you, George; understatement and clarity are so refreshing amidst the stridency.

  5. 5
    Tsu Dho Nimh

    @2 … It’s not that simple …

    http://www.azlibrary.gov/links/kingholiday.aspx

    June 18, 1987 Arizona Gov. Evan Mecham issued a proclamation declaring “the third Sunday in January, commencing in 1988 and every year thereafter to be Martin Luther King, Jr. – Civil Rights Day in the State of Arizona….”

    February 2, 1989 A bill to create a Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday and combine the state holidays for Washington and Lincoln into a Presidents’ Day was passed by the Arizona House of Representatives but was killed in the Arizona Senate.

    September 21, 1989 The Arizona Legislature created a paid Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday and eliminated Columbus Day as a paid holiday.

    September 24, 1989 Tempe architect, Julian Sanders and Italian-American groups launched a petition drive to force the referral of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday/Columbus Day issue to the ballot.

    May 17, 1990 The Arizona Legislature passed a bill which was signed within hours by Gov. Rose Mofford creating a paid Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr./Civil Rights holiday and repealing the elimination of Columbus Day as a paid holiday. Julian Sanders indicated that efforts were already under way to put the holiday question back on the November ballot. ## (Pat Flannery and Leslie S. Polk “Mofford Signs Bill Creating King Day: Law Perpetuates ‘Legacy of Justice” Phoenix Gazette, May 17, 1990, p. A1)

    November 6, 1990 Arizona voters rejected Proposition 301* which would have established the third Monday in January as Martin Luther King, Jr./Civil Rights Day, a paid holiday for state employees and would have made Columbus Day an unpaid observance on the second Sunday in October.

    Arizona voters also rejected by a narrow margin Proposition 302** which would have established the third Monday in January as Martin Luther King, Jr./Civil Rights Day, a paid holiday for state employees and retained Columbus Day as a paid holiday on the second Monday of October. (Pat Flannery “King Day Narrowly Defeated: Angered Backers Cite Report on CBS” Phoenix Gazette, November 7, 1990, p. A1).

    ## You can force a “referendum” on any law with enough signatures.

    * We already had Washington’s Birthday, Lincoln’s Birthday, and Statehood day in the spring … way too many days when nothing could be done because the government was off on holiday.
    ** The feeling was that there were already too many paid days off for the state employees.

    March 12, 1991 The Arizona Senate passed, by a 25-4 margin, House Concurrent Resolution 2011. The resolution would put a proposition on the ballot asking voters to approve a paid Martin Luther King, Jr./Civil Rights Day holiday for state employees on the third Monday in January and merging the Washington and Lincoln birthdays into Lincoln/Washington Presidents’ Day on the third Monday in February. The resolution had passed the Arizona House of Representatives by a 40-11 vote. (Pat Flannery “King Day Plan Going on 1992 Ballot: Initiative Attempt May Be Dropped” Phoenix Gazette, March 13, 1991, p. A1)

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