His observations may not be politically correct but »« Bishop Chukwuma

One pernicious aspect, you may see a stranger

I posted a short excerpt from The Collected Tweets of Someone Very Angry About Something on Facebook, and people couldn’t even figure out what it was supposed to mean, so I thought I’d crowd-source it another way.

One pernicious aspect of identity politics favored by social justice warriors is it tends to subvert any concern with the horrors of poverty

Something about a tricycle is it?

Comments

  1. Stacy says

    I think it means, “Pay attention to MEEEEE, I’m ever so much cleverer and more serious than those people over there (no, don’t look! pay no attention to them) with more successful blogs.”

  2. Rational Feminist says

    Right, because we never talk about classism, access, and wealth disparity. Mostly, this is naively ridiculous self-serving attention seeking behavior.

  3. Anathema says

    It could mean:
    “People who say that they care about social justice never talk about how terrible poverty is. Because they talk about every social justice issue other than poverty, people generally forget just how awful poverty is.”

    Or it could mean:
    “People who care about social justice are annoying. So whenever they complain about something, other people decide that it can’t really be all that bad. Therefore, by frequently complaining about the horrors of poverty, people who care about social justice lead other people to dismiss the horrors of poverty.”

  4. says

    I’m reading that as meaning that identity politics conflates disadvantages that are brought about by economic status with disadvantages brought about by being part of a minority group. Which is silly if that’s what this person is trying to say since one of the disadvantages of being in an underprivileged group is being more likely to be poor.

  5. medivh says

    Errr, is it trying to say something about “in poverty” not being an identity, so SJWs who, in the twit’s eyes, focus on identities miss bringing social justice to those in poverty? That’s about the only way I can connect the tweet to reality at all, and even then it misses quite badly. I mean, it’s at least wrong rather than not even wrong.

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