The Waterloo Bridge that’s gone forever »« Monet: Waterloo Bridge, Effet de Soleil

Comments

  1. natashatasha says

    Are there any high-res scans of it? If so, a fairly accurate reproduction could be made, and depending upon the skill of the artist it could be created indistinguishable from the original without forensic tests.

  2. says

    Dunno. I was wondering yesterday if this would prompt museum people (if they haven’t already done it) to make high-res records of everything they have.

  3. Cathy W says

    @natashatasha – Except, someone pointed out: a scan won’t show what’s under it; we don’t know what’s on the back, I can’t imagine every brush stroke could be matched precisely… and it will be forever labeled a reproduction. On some level I think a photo would be a more honest record.

  4. says

    A reproduction just wouldn’t be the same. I grew to like Impressionism, particularly Renoir, from photographs (and calendars and whatnot), but when I finally came face-to-face with some Renoir paintings at the Art Institute in Chicago, I was stunned at how much greater their impact was than any photo.

  5. says

    No, I know; what I meant was, I wondered if with a good enough record, perhaps they could make a somewhat good facsimile. Or they could just skip the record part and commission forgeries (so to speak) of each painting…just in case.

    But that’s empty babble really. That’s no solution.

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