Permission


Iran is worried about its shocking ungodly laxitude about the always-vexing problem of women going anywhere without permission. It’s thinking about tightening up.

The draft law, set to go before the 290-seat Majlis, stipulates that single women up to the age of 40 must receive official permission from their father or male guardian in order to obtain travel documents.

Under current law, all Iranians under 18 years of age — both male and female — must receive paternal permission before receiving a passport. Married women must receive their husband’s approval to receive the documents.

The proposal is expected to find support in the conservative Majlis.

I don’t think I knew that single women in Iran were required to have male guardians. I thought that was a Saudi thing.

Anyway – you get the drift. Unmarried women under 40 can’t be allowed to go places without permission, because they’re whorey sluts who will fuck every man they encounter unless they have permission to go places from a man. Permission from a man obviates the whole whorey sluts thing. It’s magic.

Iran’s civil code overwhelmingly favors fathers and husbands in all personal matters related to marriage, divorce, inheritance, and child custody.

Girls may be legally married as early as 13, and some lawmakers argue the age may, under Islamic interpretation, drop as low as 9. All women require permission from a male guardian to marry, regardless of their age.

Under Iranian law, women are also strictly compromised in terms of rights to compensation and giving legal testimony.

They are also bound by a strictly observed Islamic dress and conduct code, which forbids casual contact with the opposite sex and ordains that a woman must keep her hair and body covered in public.

That’s because everything is more of a guy thing. It’s all perfectly fair.

 

Comments

  1. bobo says

    What I love is how, in the end, the christofascists of the west use the *same* arguments for controlling women that the islamofascists do.

    Islamofascists say, women should not drive cars, they will become sluts

    Christofascists say, women should not get HPV shots, they will become sluts

    There was even a time when men said that women voting would destroy their femininity, and thus, such a thing should not be allowed.

    The reasoning is the *same*, the only difference is in the *degree* to which women are essentialy punished for the crime of being born female.

  2. eric says

    This is surprising. Not the misogyny, but the formal legalness of it. Like you, I thought most of these sorts of formal rules were limited to SA.

    When a country starts preventing people from leaving, that is a big sign that something is seriously wrong. It means you expect that your population will hate the treatment they are receiving.

  3. Ysanne says

    Um, eric?
    Iran has been known for the last 30 years as the prime example of an islamic dictatorship, and for openly and unashamedly supporting oppression of women and also terrorism. Turning the country into a fundamentalist theocracy was the whole point of the Islamic Revolution in 1978.
    Saudi Arabia, on the other hand, has been sliding into this same direction because of efforts of the royal family to keep the local fundamentalists happy by giving them power, so they don’t start their own revolution.

  4. johnthedrunkard says

    I’m not sure that the ‘whorey sluts’ thing is even thought out by these pigs. Their hatred of women is so deep, so reflexive, that the mere reminder of women’s existence is seen as a threat to the public good.

    This seems to be reflected in the cognitive dissonance between seeing ‘whorey sluts’ everywhere and simultaneously denying the existence of female sexuality. This may be more visible among Christian misogynists than the Islamic kind.

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