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Jan 04 2013

I’m sure this will receive extensive coverage in the popular science press

At last, the gene for poor science journalism has been discovered.

17 comments

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  1. 1
    moarscienceplz

    We must sequence Keith Kloor immediately!

  2. 2
    Gnumann+, out&proud cultural marxist (just don't ask me about Gramsci)

    No mention of control here – have they sequenced Ben Goldacre and Simon Singh?

  3. 3
    cervantes

    Found by Top Docs, no doubt.

  4. 4
    holytape

    Is this new gene perhaps related to the fox-1 news gene family?

  5. 5
    Dick the Damned

    Jumpin’ Jebus on a stick, do you think this could explain the press releases that come out of the Discovery Institute?

  6. 6
    stonyground

    It isn’t just science. All of you out there must have all kinds of random interests about which you have fairly extensive knowledge. Often if you read a newspaper or magazine article about one of your particular pet subjects you will find that it is riddled with errors and made up stuff.

  7. 7
    jacklewis

    Who came up with this awful idea of putting all the links and crap on the left side.
    I read like most from left to right and unless I run the browser maximized all the time, this means scrolling to the right all the time to read any article…
    Just terrible UI design.

  8. 8
    Rev. BigDumbChimp

    It isn’t just science. All of you out there must have all kinds of random interests about which you have fairly extensive knowledge. Often if you read a newspaper or magazine article about one of your particular pet subjects you will find that it is riddled with errors and made up stuff.

    all

    the

    damn

    time

  9. 9
    rorschach

    But is the gene subject to epigenetic modulation, depending on whether the journalist’s parents were HuffPo or New Scientist readers? Inquiring minds want to know!

  10. 10
    Moggie

    Why the high concentration of the gene at the Daily Mail? Inbreeding?

  11. 11
    Thomathy, Such A 'Mo

    I read like most from left to right

    Yawn.
    _____

    I can think of a few science journalists who could benefit from some gene therapy, if one is developed to treat this unfortunate genetic affliction.

  12. 12
    SallyStrange

    There must be an evolutionary psychology reason for the existence of this gene.

  13. 13
    Daz: Experiencing A Slight Gravitas Shortfall

    Often if you read a newspaper or magazine article about one of your particular pet subjects you will find that it is riddled with errors and made up stuff.

    Well, if it was good enough for the synod of Hippo, it’s good enough for the Daily Mail

  14. 14
    robro

    Scientist journalists must spawn in university PR departments. Some of the more outrageous articles I’ve seen on Science Daily were just republished university PR pieces about a “major breakthrough” discovered by some team centered at the school. It’s a real coupe if it hits Google News, of course, or HuffPuff, and for that purpose the more outlandish the better.

  15. 15
    Daz: Experiencing A Slight Gravitas Shortfall

    [Off Topic]

    jacklewis

    You spurred me to write up a workaround I found/created. If you’re on Firefox, this might be of help.

  16. 16
    cicely

    “[...]or whether the ancient Mayans discovered the gene before modern science.”
    It was the ancient Egyptians. Or possibly the Chinese.
    -

  17. 17
    khms

    I think the best of these articles is the original one at http://www.speld.nl/2011/07/09/gen-voor-slechte-wetenschapsjournalistiek-gevonden/ – if you don’t speak the language, I think the sense comes through even with Google Translate: http://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.speld.nl%2F2011%2F07%2F09%2Fgen-voor-slechte-wetenschapsjournalistiek-gevonden%2F

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