If it bleeds, it leads


Newspaper editors must relish this situation. There is so much blood.

There are unknown numbers of dead — hundreds, the newspapers say, while also stating that many are uncounted in the chaos — and a million people displaced, bridges and roads and towns destroyed, and the Russian army rumbles slowly forward.

Just over 1 million people have fled Ukraine since the Russian invasion began, according to data from the U.N. refugee agency — an exodus that is set to become Europe’s worst humanitarian crisis this century. That figure already matches the number of refugees who were displaced from Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan in 2015. The International Criminal Court has opened an investigation into possible war crimes in Ukraine, the intergovernmental organization’s prosecutor said in a statement.

It wasn’t that long ago that I’d open up the news in the morning to see graphs and tallies of how many died the slow death of COVID-19. Now I open the news to see the stories of sudden gory deaths, explosions, and families fleeing the onslaught. It is not an improvement, world. Especially since the pandemic continues, it’s just been bumped from top billing.

Comments

  1. birgerjohansson says

    Churchill’s response to the news of Pearl Harbor and the death toll was “a couple of bad nights of the Blitz”.
    But the emotional response to very dramatic destruction is not logical.
    I hope the images will spread inside Russia and undermine support for the war.
    I also hope people are willing to accept the economic sacrifices inherent in getting oil and gas from other sources than Russia- it is a petrostate with an obsolete infrastructure.

  2. wzrd1 says

    Well, the Russians are already having logistical problems with the weather not allowing a hard freeze of the ground. Supply trucks and tracks don’t really do well in knee deep and deeper mud, they simply get stuck with their floorboards or hull bottom resting firmly submerged in mud and no traction.
    Military vehicles, especially armored vehicles are fuel hogs, so slow or no fuel, slow or no movement. Patton proved that nicely during his rapid advance far beyond his logistical trains.
    Russia also already lost one general to the fighting, one notorious for human rights abuses against LGBTQ persons, ranging from torture to mass murders. No great loss to humanity there.

    Meanwhile, COVID has fallen from top billing, but is expected to spike massively in Ukraine and likely in the Russian forces. Even money, we’ll get a new flavor of COVID to sample, likely one that’ll evade the vaccines fully.
    All, to “rid Ukraine of Nazi Jews”, aka Zelenskyy. And a holocaust memorial… Apparently, history isn’t a strong point with Putana, erm, Putin.

  3. KG says

    birgerjohansson@1,
    Churchill was actually delighted by the news of Pearl Harbor, because he knew it meant American entry into the war (and was rightly confident this would be against Germany as well as Japan).

  4. StevoR says

    If it bleeds people – just like us but for twist of luck of birth and circumstance – are hurt and often dying.

    Whoever and where ever they are.

    If it leads .. leads to what & willwillewhat itleads to be better or worse for who and why?

  5. Tethys says

    The link is unusable unless you want to subscribe. Bloody capitalism ruins everything.

    Kherson is a hub city. I’ve not got strong enough curse words in English to express my opinion of this invasion. It requires every possible inflection, and the proper sharp intonations and suffixes.

  6. raven says

    Reminds me of growing up during the Vietnam war.
    The Vietnam war was on the television evening news every night for years.

    That had a lot to do with Americans eventually turning against the war.

  7. says

    @2
    Spike in covid will happen also in neighbouring countriess, COViD rules are basically suspended for refugees.
    On the brighter note, pet rules are also laxed, if your dog has no paperwork it will be microchipped and vaxed for rabies for free.

    About bombing holocaust memorial – the target was TV broadcasting tower, Russia can’t afford Russian receiving Ukrainian TV. Holocaust memorial was next to it.

  8. davidc1 says

    @2 As long as tin tits is safe.
    At the risk of being accused of being a Churchill lover,while he did want the US to come into the fight against Germany and Italy,there is no way he wanted the Japanese to be dragged into it
    He knew how weak the British Empire was in Asia.

  9. unclefrogy says

    war and pestilence, that is two of them the fundie christians must be really glad
    it is something that has been worrying me with every picture from there I have seen
    and let us stop and praise and give gratitude for mud!

  10. littlejohn says

    Just as you’re annoyed by non-biologists pretending to understand evolution, I (a retired newspaper editor) am annoyed by non-journalists who think they know how journalism works. You don’t.
    I won’t get into it except to point out that newspaper editors don’t write the headlines.

  11. Tethys says

    Oh look, someone is being a dumbshit in yet another thread.

    @ Brony

    I randomly came across his lame excuse in the are you feeling overwhelmed thread, and here it is.

    commenter who loves to use misogynist slurs. -I was diagnosed as having
    a Borderline Personality Disorder,which to some people on here might explain a lot.

    To the misogynist-
    No, your disorder doesn’t exempt you from the consequences of being an offensive pos. You owe multiple apologies for your rancid shit- throwing behavior. Get meds if you simply cannot stop yourself from being abusive towards women online.

    Shunning, resumed.

  12. whheydt says

    Re: unclefroggy @ #11…
    IS it possible that the current commanders of the Russian army have forgotten that the age-old list of defenses of Russia includes General Mud? Nothing like a tank on a transporter stuck in a miles long traffic jam to spell “sitting target”…

  13. Walter Solomon says

    KG

    (and was rightly confident this would be against Germany as well as Japan).

    He has Germany to thank for that. If Hitler didn’t declare war on the US in the wake of the Pearl Harbor attack, the US wouldn’t have entered the European theater.

  14. says

    General comment: I’ve tried to leave things conveniently open for looking at anatomy based slurs in general. Asshole seems fine for the anally needy. I prefer behavior based insults myself.

    @Tethys 15
    I see it. Sorry for the confusion when I asked. I should have asked david directly.

  15. GerrardOfTitanServer says

    The entire situation is just miserable. I am continually surprised and heartened by the spirit and humanity of the Ukrainian leaders, however. One story that I will never forget is this one:

    In the middle of a brutal war, while under attack from a stronger attacker, entirely unprovoked attack, the Ukrainian ambassador to the UN takes time to humanize and empathize with the attacking soldiers, to show how the Russian foot soldiers are just as much of a victim as any other victim in this gods-awful mess. Massive props to Ukraine and the ambassador for this.

  16. davidc1 says

    @13 Tin Tits is the name the citizens of Kiev have given to the 160ft high statue in the center of the city,next to the memorial garden of The Great Patriotic war.
    So stick that in your pipe and smoke it.

  17. davidc1 says

    @16Well,the German U boats were attacking US ships, earlier in 1941 they sank a US Navy ship.
    So if FDR had told adolf to knock it off,and adolf had refused, maybe that would have been enough for America to declare war on Germany.

  18. davidc1 says

    @21 😂😂😂😂So, it’s ok for the people of Kiev to call the statue by that name,but not me?

  19. raven says

    Well, just saw that a Ukrainian nuclear power plant is on fire, after the Russians shelled it.
    This has not bee a good week for a lot of reasons.
    I hope this doesn’t do a Chernobyl and melt down.
    Odd factoid. As most know, Chernobyl is in…Ukraine.

    March 3, 2022 4:44 PM PST Last Updated 39 min ago
    Europe’s largest nuclear power plant on fire after Russian attack, says local mayor
    Reuters

    BORODYANKA/LVIV, Ukraine, March 4 (Reuters) – The Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant in Ukraine, the largest of its kind in Europe, was on fire early on Friday after an attack by Russian troops, the mayor of the nearby town of Energodar said.

    There has been fierce fighting between local forces and Russian troops, Dmytro Orlov said in an online post, adding that there had been casualties without giving details.

    Earlier, Ukrainian authorities reported Russian troops were stepping up efforts to seize the plant and had entered the town with tanks.

    “As a result of continuous enemy shelling of buildings and units of the largest nuclear power plant in Europe, the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant is on fire,” Orlov said on his Telegram channel, citing what he called a threat to world security. He did not give details.

  20. raven says

    15 reactors
    Ukraine ranks third in the world when it comes to how much of its electricity comes from nuclear energy. That power comes from 15 reactors at four separate nuclear plants.1 day ago

    Ukraine’s nuclear power plants are at ‘unprecedented’ risk as …https://www.theverge.com › russia-invasion-ukraine-unpr…

    It can always get worse.
    Ukraine has 15 nuclear reactors which supply much of its electricity.

    Who knows, maybe the Russians can cause more than one to melt down.

    I have to say it.
    I wasn’t aware that Ukraine has a large nuclear industry. The technology to keep a reactor going is more or less the same as that for building nuclear bombs.
    Right about now, if I was in a leadership position there, I’d be seriously thinking about building some nuclear weapons. They are easy, based on 1940s technology. Easy enough that the South Africans built 4.

    It is fair to say that no one directly attacks a nuclear power these days. Even North Korea is relatively safe from us.
    We are seeing what the alternative is right now. The Russians could knock Ukraine down to a 19th century standard of living in a few weeks just by taking out the electricity grid and power plants.

  21. StevoR says

    @19. davidc1 :

    Actually wikipedia notes thatn Ukrainians call it Батьківщина-Мати, romanized: Batkivshchýna-Máty, or Batkivshchyna-Maty or the The Motherland Monument :

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motherland_Monument

    Incidentally :

    In modern-day Kyiv, the statue remains controversial, with some claiming it should be pulled down and its metal used for more functional purposes. Financial shortages mean that the flame, which uses up to 400 m3 (14,000 cu ft) of gas per hour, can only burn on the biggest national holidays, and rumours persist that the statue is built on unstable foundations, something strongly denied by the Kyiv local government.[7][8]

    In April 2015, the parliament of Ukraine outlawed Soviet and Communist symbols, street names and monuments, in a decommunization attempt.[9] But World War II monuments are excluded from these laws.[10] Director of the Ukrainian Institute of National Remembrance Volodymyr Viatrovych stated in February 2018 that the Soviet hammer and sickle on the shield of the monument should be removed to comply with decommunization laws and replace it with the Ukrainian trident. To date however, it is still not removed.

    Seems Davidc1 is really stretching to try and use gendered words that will annoy people here. BTW. Do you actully speak Ukrainian David & why not use the Ukrainian language name for it rather than an english translation of the supposedly popular alternative nickname for Kyiv’s “Iron Lady” statute?

  22. StevoR says

    @12. littlejohn :

    lJust as you’re annoyed by non-biologists pretending to understand evolution, I (a retired newspaper editor) am annoyed by non-journalists who think they know how journalism works. You don’t.
    I won’t get into it except to point out that newspaper editors don’t write the headlines.

    So blaming the sub-editors or editors who, so I gather, do write the headlines? Don’t they count as journalists or at least working in the media too and if not what are they then? Seriously.

    You say this isn’t how journalism works but it certainly looks that way to us and if it isn’t, then how is it working? What exactly are we getting wrong about this, please?

    Incidentally, a meme seen on fb earlier makes some interesting comparisons to the coverage of the war in Ukraine contrasted with the largely not covered war in Yemen.Any thoughts on that?

  23. raven says

    Ironically, in 1994 Ukraine was the third largest nuclear power.
    They gave up 5,000 nukes for security agreements with Russia and the USA.
    And look how that has worked out for them.

    NYTimes Ukraine Gave Up a Giant Nuclear Arsenal 30 Years Ago. Today There Are Regrets.
    When the Soviet Union collapsed, Ukraine turned over thousands of atomic weapons in exchange for security guarantees from Russia, the United States and other countries.

    At the end of the Cold War, the third largest nuclear power on earth was not Britain, France or China. It was Ukraine. Ukraine inheriting roughly 5,000 nuclear arms
    “We gave away the capability for nothing,” said Andriy Zahorodniuk, a former defense minister of Ukraine. Referring to the security assurances Ukraine won in exchange for its nuclear arms, he added: “Now, every time somebody offers us to sign a strip of paper, the response is, ‘Thank you very much. We already had one of those some time ago.’”

    Western analysts say the current Ukrainian mood tends to romanticize the atomic past. “The gist is, ‘We had the weapons, gave them up and now look what’s happening,’” said Mariana Budjeryn, a Ukraine specialist at Harvard University.
    Instead, Ukraine punted. It demanded that, in exchange for nuclear disarmament, it would need ironclad security guarantees. That was the heart of the agreement signed in Moscow early in 1994 by Russia, Ukraine and the United States.

    In late 1994, the pledges got fleshed out. The accord, known as the Budapest Memorandum, signed by Russia, Ukraine, Britain and the United States, promised that none of the nations would use force or threats against Ukraine and all would respect its sovereignty and existing borders. The agreement also vowed that, if aggression took place, the signatories would seek immediate action from the United Nations Security Council to aid Ukraine.

    While Kyiv had failed to get what it wanted — the kind of legally binding guarantees that would come with a formal treaty ratified by the U.S. Senate — it received assurances that Washington would take its political commitments as seriously as its legal obligations, according to Dr. Budjeryn, a research analyst at the Managing the Atom project at Harvard’s Kennedy School.

  24. davidc1 says

    @26,28,29,30😂😂😂😂😂😂😂
    Do you think Wikipedia is gospel,the citizens of Kiev do refer to the Statue as Tin Tits, maybe because it was a gift from the Soviet union.
    Europe faces the likelihood of getting caught up in nuclear fallout, and the thing that is getting your knickers in a twist is my use of some words.

  25. lochaber says

    so, anyone want to take any bets on how long it is before davidc1 starts talking about Lovecraft’s cat?

  26. John Morales says

    davidc1 faced davidc1:

    Europe faces the likelihood of getting caught up in nuclear fallout, and the thing that is getting your knickers in a twist is my intransigent and deliberate and contrarian use of some words I’ve been repeatedly advised in no uncertain terms are offensive to this community.

    In the interest of accuracy.

    (You did get the punctuation correct, though!)

    Note that Europe faces the likelihood of getting caught up in nuclear fallout, and the thing that is getting your underwear in a twist is people reacting to your recalcitrance.

  27. Walter Solomon says

    davidc1 @20

    Well,the German U boats were attacking US ships, earlier in 1941 they sank a US Navy ship.

    Much like the Lusitania in the first World War, those ships were carrying munitions to be delivered to Germany’s adversaries. It’s understandable that they were targeted. I don’t believe that alone would’ve been enough to sway Congress though.

  28. Walter Solomon says

    StevoR @27

    Incidentally, a meme seen on fb earlier makes some interesting comparisons to the coverage of the war in Ukraine contrasted with the largely not covered war in Yemen.Any thoughts on that?

    I think the lack of coverage of the Saudi war in Yemen compared to Russia’s war in Ukraine can be explained by a combination of Western bias/Eurocentrism, racism, and last but not least the fear of nuclear annihilation that the Ukraine conflict invokes that Yemen doesn’t.

  29. davidc1 says

    @36 But what about the amurican boys being killed by them Germans?
    Looks like the A&E depts around the world are dealing with a rash of cases
    involving underwear being in a tangle.

  30. says

    Final warning, davidc1. Learn that if the word is offending commenters here more than it is people far, far way who don’t read the blog, that is a good reason to stop using it.

    By the way, I’ve also added one of your favorite sexist insults to the blacklist, so if some of your comments stop appearing here, you’ll know why.

  31. davidc1 says

    Ok,Doc,it’s been fun while it has lasted,take care,I wish you and your family all the best.
    As for the rest of you,you can all fuck off,then you can fuck off a bit further.

  32. Rob Grigjanis says

    Walter Solomon @37: Both wars have been going on since 2014, with thousands killed in each. I’d guess that the coverage has been about the same until the recent all-out invasion.

  33. Walter Solomon says

    Rob Grigjanis @43

    Both wars have been going on since 2014, with thousands killed in each. I’d guess that the coverage has been about the same until the recent all-out invasion.

    Since 2014, Ukraine, Syria, and Yemen all received more attention than both the US war in Afghanistan, which only popped back into the news when we pulled out, and certainly much more attention than the unending US drone program.

    All three of those things also received more attention than the Huigers in China, Rohingya in Myanmar, and Boko Haram and SARS police force in Nigeria.

  34. GerrardOfTitanServer says

    davidc1
    I don’t get it. What’s so wrong or hard about not using gendered terms in a context which could easily be misconstrued as perpetuating harmful gender stereotypes? What an odd hill to die on. It’s just like white Americans who die on basically the same hill when they demand that they be allowed to use the n word. That’s what you’re doing right now.

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