Comments

  1. angela78 says

    I read that article.
    It does add nothing to the actual topic. Does not shift a bit the point whether Tyson is guilty or not.
    There is one accusation of rape. If this is credible Tyson must be fired, judged and arrested. Otherwise, it doesn’t matter how many possibly-inappropriate-but-probably-not events get to the media.

    Making up your opinion on the reality of an awful criminal act based on unrelated events in the person’s history. This is the same shitty reasoning that gets women’s credibility put in discussion if they were not absolutely virginal in their life.
    Sorry, no. Put up some serious legal scrutiny of the alleged rape, that is the important point. I don’t want a rapist free around, I don’t want an innocent man accused.

  2. Rich Woods says

    If this is credible Tyson must be fired, judged and arrested.

    I think you’ve got those three actions back to front.

  3. kesara says

    Awesome, yet another article saying that making a woman feel uncomfortable in any way whatsoever is basically the same as rape.

    From the current trash piece:

    I have, since I first learned about them, felt that Tchiya Amet’s allegations merited a response, and I waited, for years, for one. Another post from Patheos last week featured an interview with Amet along with stories of alleged sexual harassment from two other women, an astronomy professor and a Cosmos production assistant. (Buzzfeed also had a subsequent article citing a fourth woman with similar claims).

    The allegations are not similar at all. Allegation #1 involves drugging and raping a woman, and allegations #2-4 do not even rise to the level of sexual harrassment, one of them is not even sexual in nature in any way at all.

  4. snuffcurry says

    Making up your opinion on the reality of an awful criminal act based on unrelated events in the person’s history. This is the same shitty reasoning that gets women’s credibility put in discussion if they were not absolutely virginal in their life.

    Proved the point beautifully by comparing completely benign behavior (having had too much consensual sex for some people’s liking) with questionable behavior directed at someone who has since complained. Pretending we have to atomize a person’s history, treat each act in a vacuum without considering context and relevant priors (like they do, y’know, in court) is the cherry in top. So much disengenuous Vulcanning, it’s almost a parody of itself. Lol at the idea that failing to be a virgin is as unreasonable an expectation of someone as them never having sexually harrassed someone. What a difficult thing to ask of a person.

  5. methuseus says

    I don’t think anyone who has commented understood the piece. The author was stating that black men do assault black women, just how white men assault black women. No gracious or helpful actions on his part can possibly negate that fact.

    Chanda is stating that there is no reason to discount things out of hand, and that they should be investigated. She is specifically saying it’s possible, not that it’s guaranteed. She believes them, and wants investigations to go forward.

    She is also saying that Black women need to stop protecting the Black men that have assaulted them out of duty to not demean anyone that is black. This may prompt other women to talk about issues they have had with Tyson. Just because all of Chanda’s experiences with Tyson were good and fun, doesn’t mean that everyone else’s experiences were the same.

  6. Allison says

    I read that article.
    It does add nothing to the actual topic. Does not shift a bit the point whether Tyson is guilty or not.

    It may not add anything to what you consider the “actual topic.”

    It does address the elephant in the room, though: the fact that Tyson is Black, in a racist society and, a fortiore, a racist community (research & academia.) To what extent does his being Black affect the (notoriously racist) news media’s reporting? Not to mention the blogosphere. To what extent will he get less support and be excused less than a white physicist would? How will this affect the situation of other Black scientists and academics? And to what extent has Black solidarity (a necessity in a racist society) allowed him to get away with more?

    If you’re white, it’s easy to reduce the “actual topic” to Tyson’s guilt or innocence. You can play the “I don’t see race” (which really means “I don’t see racism”) card. Ms. Prescod-Weinstein’s article points out that for Black people, especially Black scientists and academics, the stakes are higher.

  7. bryanfeir says

    @Allison:
    That was certainly something that came up during the lead-up to Cosby’s trial. At least one of the women in question explicitly said that she hadn’t talked about this earlier because she had expected extreme pushback from within her own community for trying to ‘tarnish the reputation’ of one of the first black men to get leading roles on TV.

    And you’d better believe that Cosby knew that his status made him pretty much untouchable because he was a symbol of black people being able to make it, and attacks on him would be seen as attacks on all black men. The living within a racist society aspect produces a very strong ‘us against them’ attitude, which leads to protecting against allegations that would affect the ‘us’, even if the allegations are true.

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