Cracks? What cracks? »« It won’t be Dartmouth

Stuff and Nonsense on the track record of the anti-vax movement

Have a useful post listing times the anti-vaccination movement has been wrong.

Anti-vaccinationists have made a wide range of claims about the dangers of vaccines. In spite of the fact that they have generally had neither data nor a plausible mechanism for the claimed effect, several of their claims have been investigated by researchers.

As it turns out, the anti-vaccinationists are remarkably consistent. Time and time again, they are shown to be wrong. I’m not sure how many times a group needs to be wrong before people stop seeing them as credible. Perhaps people need to be reminded of how many times this group has been wrong?

So there are some reminders.

Comments

  1. Pierce R. Butler says

    I’m not sure how many times a group needs to be wrong before people stop seeing them as credible.

    Considering the track record of political and (especially) financial pundits in US corporate media, the answer to this (implied) question probably requires a course in transfinite set theory to be comprehended.

  2. peterh says

    “Time and time again, they are shown to be wrong. I’m not sure how many times a group needs to be wrong before people stop seeing them as credible.”

    Time and time again, ID – creationism – irreducible complexity – have been shown to be wrong and even spectacularly wrong, yet thousands flock to those banners for null thought.

  3. left0ver1under says

    peterh (#2) –

    Don’t forget the imbeciles anti-sex education, who can’t grasp the 100% correlation between sex ed and low rates of teen pregnancy and STD transmission. And the idiots who want “war on terrorism” instead of addressing the cause of terrorism (e.g. imperialism and theft of wealth). And the republiclowns in the US who claim welfare recipients are all drug users, despite testing in Florida proving the claim is a lie.

    “Blinded by ideology” is both a metaphorical and literal term.

    As the saying goes, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. But I’m beginning to suspect that the morons in the is world would rather “solve” problems (which they rarely do) than prevent problems because their “solution” is more profitable for themselves. And that, of course, is yet another example of the same problem.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>