Huh. That’s exactly how I imagined missionaries did their work


You will obey the White Man, or you disgrace Jesus.

I’d like to know what happened to that guy. He’s been kicked out of Uganda, I hope.

Comments

  1. says

    Holy crap the patience of those men, both of whom were in much better shape than that maga. The one being assaulted and spit on could have put that hypocrite down and I can’t think of anyone viewing that video who would have blamed him.

  2. redwood says

    The patience of that man being assaulted is amazing, but he probably realized that if he punched the guy’s lights out, he would somehow get the blame, even though it was being taped. Still, some good old solid proselytizing going on in the name of Jesus, amen. Turnip probably wants to give that guy the Medal of Freedom: “The Presidential Medal of Freedom is awarded by the President of the United States ‘for especially meritorious contribution to (1) the security or national interests of the United States, or (2) world peace, or (3) cultural or other significant public or private endeavors.'” He’d get it for all three reasons.

  3. Jacqueline Davis says

    The man’s patience is amazing. He may realize that he’s dealing with obvious mental illness. Bi-polar, maybe?

  4. Saad says

    They’re definitely not sending their best. That’s the main thing they’re known for in history.

  5. says

    I always thought that Toyotomi Hideyoshi was demonstrating brilliant statecraft when he realized that christian missionaries were setting up an alternate power-structure and ordered them hunted down and crucified. Missionaries are, in fact, the leading edge of colonialism. Toyotomi’s instincts were correct.

  6. microraptor says

    Marcus Ranum @7: That was probably the main thing that kept Japan from suffering from European colonialism.

  7. komarov says

    If I recall the new testament correctly, hitting and insulting someone while preaching about Jesus Christ, his love, forgiveness and so forth should instantly disqualify you from … well, preaching about Jesus Christ (etc.). It should also earn you condemnation from popes of every denomination. And if we did live in a divine cosmos a lightning bolt to teach you some humility should also be forthcoming. All that on top of “mere” earth-bound justice, of course.

    I’ll second the admiration for the man being assaulted. I have no idea how I would respond in suche a situation, having never ever encountered anything remotely comparable – thank Christ if need be – but it certainly would not be the legendary degree of patience and self-control shown by this man.

  8. cartomancer says

    Funnily enough that’s how most of us expect Americans to behave overseas, missionary or no.

    Well, I say most of us. Those of us with oil tend to expect drone strikes and cruise missiles.

  9. sparks says

    “He has disgraced Jesus!!111”

    Well, that rather depends on if Sky Daddy Jr. actually exists, but let’s not quibble …

    “…drone strikes and cruise missiles.” Both of which wouldn’t be possible without your oil. :)

  10. Tsu Dho Nimh says

    Could he be taking the anti-malarial drug called Lariam”
    It’s known for producing mental aberrations.

    That’s an astounding display of restraint in the face of insanity.

  11. says

    microraptor@#8:
    That was probably the main thing that kept Japan from suffering from European colonialism.

    Well, the Tai Ping Rebellion of 1850 was contextualied as a neo-christian movement (though mainstream christianity are quick to reject them and the mormons) they were religious insurgencies that cost more lives than WWI and WWII combined. So, yeah.

  12. unclefrogy says

    #12
    he may have been taking anti-malarial drugs but that cracker always talks to “N…..” that way

    uncle frogy

  13. says

    Funnily enough that’s how most of us expect Americans to behave overseas, missionary or no.

    I remember being a US citizen in Paris. I was only there for a few weeks total (most of my summer in France was spent down south), but I had three different experiences where US citizens made me extremely uncomfortable and embarrassed to be from the US. The first was a woman leaving a train station, having arrived in Paris from somewhere in Germany. (I guess she flew in to Germany?) She was angry that no one would speak to her in English. There were probably plenty of people who could help her, but the first couple people couldn’t, and so she just started berating people in english for not helping her, whether they could understand or not. A train station employee who didn’t speak english came out to try to stop the disturbance at the same time as I was walking by with my French friend. The employee, unfortunately, only knew a few words of english and was obviously looking around for anyone’s help. My friend & I stopped, did some translating, and the woman calmed down & went away. Then I had to briefly apologize to the station employee for her behavior and, when he thanked me for helping, I felt compelled to say that I was from the US and not all of us are so ridiculous and hostile in our behaviors.

    But a few days later, there was a guy from the US who was berating a store manager in an audio shop. I was looking for some headphones. He was looking for a Digital Audio Tape machine (this was before rewritable CDs) as a hi-fi solution for recording and replaying his music. I actually knew about the machines only because I’d read an article in an in-flight magazine on my way to France. It was boosting travel to Japan because there were cool things that were the latest in tech that you could only get in Japan at that point. One of them was DAT (which never caught on). The shop keeper was unfamiliar with the tech – and no wonder. The manager did appear to know some reasonable amount of english, but since “digital audio tape” was a knew tech he didn’t know about, the US person thought they just didn’t understand english. I didn’t so much translate as explain to the manager that the person wanted to get this new tech and didn’t realize that “only available overseas” doesn’t mean “available in every country other than the US”. Then I explained to the customer that there were no DAT machines here. Then there was more back & forth, but none of it was strictly translation work. The jerkface was just insisting that I explain again or ask again, and I would turn as explain, “He doesn’t seem to want to give up, he’s convinced that you’re hiding them in your shoes.” That joke didn’t go over as well as it could have – the stress of the moment and my imperfect french made the manager wonder if I was saying something nonsensical on accident. But he got it eventually.

    The third? Well, i’m tired of this now, so I won’t detail the third, but yeah. Most people in Paris aren’t from the states, and I encountered 4 people ranting and being verbally abusive somewhere near me during my few weeks in Paris. THREE of them were from the US, and all three of them were white, and all three were coming from a place of extreme entitlement that fueled their hostility.

    Blaming this on mental illness or malaria drugs is completely unwarranted. The common factor in my experiences was a particular brand of white, American entitlement. We know from the Jesus ranting that the person in the video is displaying a smug, religious sense of superiority. There’s no reason to believe that the combination of white, American entitlement + smug religious superiority couldn’t explain that behavior without any other factors involved.

  14. Connie Collins says

    Oh, the guy he’s assaulting is so showing off. I’m absolutely sure, watching the Ugandan block so casually, that he could totally annihilate his attacker. The fact that he doesn’t makes him the much better person. I hope the missionary does time for assault.

  15. consciousness razor says

    off-topic:

    It was boosting travel to Japan because there were cool things that were the latest in tech that you could only get in Japan at that point. One of them was DAT (which never caught on).

    DAT was used a lot for professional recordings, but it (obviously) didn’t take over the normal consumer market like CDs did or like (non-DAT) cassettes and vinyl before that. I’m sure it was a bit more popular in Japan, because of Sony. They weren’t cheap. I only ever used them when working for Big Organization X, because it could have nice things … but not me personally. Anyway, DAT was pretty important for about 15-20 years, I guess; then, digital storage appeared in the early 2000s and really killed it. It won’t have a comeback. Good riddance, I say. Getting to the right spot on the tape was a constant source of irritation.

  16. evodevo says

    they don’t have to be overseas … I have a few local MAGAts I am acquainted with who act that way HERE …entitled prick fundie Xtians every one …

  17. mickll says

    Those two men showed the utmost humanity and restraint, it’s a shame they had to be subjected to that bullshit.

  18. chigau (違う) says

    Connie Collins #18
    I wouldn’t agree with “showing off” but I totally agree that Hotel Guy was never in any danger from the “ex-marine”.
    Hotel Guy was just behaving according to a universal rule of TheHospitalityIndustry:
    Do Not Punch The Customers

  19. springa73 says

    @#7 and #8

    A little off-topic, but I don’t think 17th century Japan was ever in danger of conquest by Europeans. It was just too far away, and Europeans had no great disease or technology advantage. It might have become mostly Christian under different leadership (unlikely, but possible), but politically it would have been quite independent.

    Also, the relationship between missionaries and imperial power was a lot more complicated than that. Missionaries sometimes came before other imperial agents, sometimes after, and were as likely as not to be at odds with other elements of imperial power such as soldiers, settlers, merchants, etc. They were almost never just components in a well-oiled imperial machine – in fact, imperialism was almost never a well-oiled machine in the first place!

  20. Curt Sampson says

    @Crip Dyke: I wonder if that sense of entitlement you describe is related to the ‘greatest country in the world’ propaganda/meme that seems to be so prevalent in the U.S.

    One of the weirdest things to me about the U.S. (not that I’ve spent all that much time there) is the all the U.S. flags everywhere and the pervasiveness of people saying ‘America’s the greatest country in the world.’ In Canada we certainly consider ourselves (most of the time) to be a great country, but not greater than Norway or Japan or any other first-world country you want to compare us with. I’d imagine that getting that sort of indoctrination almost continuously starting as a child might affect one’s worldview.

  21. John Morales says

    It [Japan] might have become mostly Christian under different leadership (unlikely, but possible), but politically it would have been quite independent.

    Not that unlikely. Christianity is perfectly suited to authoritarian rule.

    (The then-ruling-class gets kudos for recognising that)

  22. ajbjasus says

    #15 I guess all countries have people who behave like arseholes abroad but I’m afraid someAmericans are a bit of a blunt instrument. I was in a restaurant in Venice where a bunch were making a massive fuss about their pasta because it wasn’t like they got it back home so was obviously wrong. Also why wear baseball caps all the time even when having a meal in a restaurant?

  23. says

    CD

    She was angry that no one would speak to her in English.

    I think that many US Americans are thoroughly confused by this simple fact of life.
    Of course it speaks volume to the general level of education and entitlement of US American tourists, but they actually do not know that not everybody knows English and think they’re just mean.
    Many, many years ago my mum went to a professional training for a very complicated, new and expensive lab equipment from an American company. This training took place over several days in Munich and was held by an American employee of that company in German. In the evening they would all go and dine and sit together and during one of those occasions this guy, who spoke fluent German and worked in Germany with Germans mentioned that while he could understand that kids had to learn German in school and that such semi-official business like his had to be conducted in German, at home they, the Germans, were all speaking English for sure.
    He was shocked when my mum told him that no, not only do Germans in general not speak English at home though many families are bilingual, also did she not know any English, having learned French and Latin at school.
    I’ve got a bunch of those anecdotes, even though none of those people were very rude, they were all just very uneducated and completely unaware of it.

  24. anchor says

    Nice exhibition of “turn the other cheek”. Whether that bastard was compromised by ‘medication’ or not, he sure was well-fortified with an impressive load of white supremacist vernacular. That was already there in him ready to be unleashed.

  25. KG says

    Well, the Tai Ping Rebellion of 1850 was contextualied as a neo-christian movement (though mainstream christianity are quick to reject them and the mormons) they were religious insurgencies that cost more lives than WWI and WWII combined. So, yeah. – Marcus Ranum@13
    Nope.

  26. johnson catman says

    Great example of a christian. And yes, the Ugandan showed amazing restraint. I would not have had such restraint once that asshole put his hands on me the first time. Jesus would not have been able to protect him.

  27. says

    Reminds me of the film God Loves Uganda.
    Missionaries infest the place, pushing all the horrible shit christianity pushes in more developed countries, with less pushback.

  28. colinday says

    @KG
    #29

    In that same article, farther down the page, it lists the numbers you gave.

  29. says

    Giliell@27:

    I think that many US Americans are thoroughly confused by this simple fact of life.
    Of course it speaks volume to the general level of education and entitlement of US American tourists, but they actually do not know that not everybody knows English and think they’re just mean.

    I’m not sure this attitude is confined to Americans; there are inhabitants of all parts of the Anglosphere guilty of this kind of willful blindness; see, for example, this teeth-grinding video of British expats living in Spain, many of them for decades, many of whom cannot speak a word of Spanish and are proud of that fact… and many of whom voted for Brexit because they don’t want foreigners coming to live in their country; i.e., the one they’re not actually resident in anymore. 🙄

  30. nomadiq says

    That white guy is probably sitting in a Ugandan prison right now, unable to understand why representitives from the US mission can’t just spring him out, because ‘Merica. Actually there is a really evil part of me that hopes that’s true and enjoys
    the idea of US Embassy staff turning up to the jail, as is his right, but then having a few things explained to him about how the world works and how limited their assistance is.

  31. KG says

    colinday@33,34,

    Thanks. Did you notice that there’s an associated “Talk” page where the inconsistencies about death toll are discussed – among many other complaints about the article. It notes that most of the population of China lived then, as now, in the coastal regions, which while not exempt from involvement, were much less affected than the interior. Moreover, census data from 1812 (333,700,560) and 1887 (401,520,392) (bracketing the Taiping rebellion) make a death toll anywhere near 100 million between 1851 and 1864 very difficult to credit. While it’s obviously very difficult to get accurate figures, my hunch is that the larger figures are simply pulled out of the air, often in the service of some ideological or orientalist prejudice.

  32. colinday says

    Do you need an account to participate? I clicked the Talk link and didn’t get anything useful.

  33. KG says

    colinday@39,

    I don’t know, but I’ve never set an account up, and when I click on the link, I get a page with a lot of detailed arguments about what should an dshouldn’t be on the page – I’ve no idea why this doesn’t work for you I’m afraid.

  34. wereatheist says

    The thing possibly to agree on the Tai Ping rebellion is, in it’s time, it killed more of the world population than WWII did, in it’s time.

  35. blf says

    On DAT: I actually have a DAT unit, and have used it to (semi-professionally) record sessions. At the time, as mentioned previously, it is one of best affordable technologies for live / session recordings.

    DAT also had a use in (computer-)data backup, but never(?) caught on. I did some DAT-backups at one point, but can not now recall what happened to them.

    On eejits from the States: Many(? well some) seem to think they speak “American”, not English. The first time I encountered this was in a BBC video from the ’70s(?), albeit I do not now recall the context, only the women insisting she spoke “American”. At the moment, the most famous example of this I can recall is the ex-governor of Alaska, Palin, insisting she spoke “American” — and given the mangled syntax &tc, possibly even true…

  36. damien75 says

    @Giliell
    #27

    Where did that American guy get his idea that Germans speak English at home from ?
    How would that work ?
    Especially a guy who speaks fluent German ! How could he speak such good German and know so little ?
    I’ve never heard of any similar story.

  37. damien75 says

    @Crip Dyke, Right Reverend Feminist FuckToy of Death & Her Handmaiden
    #15

    Although I live in Paris, I have never seen anything quite as bad as what you describe, however I have seen for instance an educated (well, apparently) American lady going to Paris to attend a fair and expecting waiters in restaurants to speak English and respond to English.
    And that is so confusing.
    I didn’t know what to tell her, every explanation that was coming to my mind was so simple and so obvious that I seemed to me that giving it to her was outright offensive. What was I going to say ? “In France you will meet some French people and they primarily speak French.” ? “Restaurant waiters are not the most educated people in the country ?”

    A friend of mind owns a restaurant. He was a waiter for years. I don’t think he speaks any English. He didn’t even graduate high school.

  38. Azkyroth, B*Cos[F(u)]==Y says

    KG: I don’t know why I had 125mm stuck in my mind

    You might wanna get that checked out o.o

  39. Azkyroth, B*Cos[F(u)]==Y says

    On eejits from the States: Many(? well some) seem to think they speak “American”, not English.

    With the experiences I’ve had of UK-English Chauvinism, I have some sympathy for this.

  40. says

    The kind of social collapse that comes as a result of massive wars can be hard to imagine. The thirty years’ war (if my recollection is not wonky) resulted in some areas’ population being reduced 20-50%. The taiping rebellion was also a massive no holds-barred slaughter, with whole cities being wiped out. So was WWII, of course. I also probably confused military deaths and civilian deaths.

    I don’t recall where the casualty estimate I quoted came from (probably undergrad asian history class circa 1984) but it seemed plausible and I remembered it. Note also that back in the long-ago 1980s some counts of WWII deaths dramatically undercounted Soviet casualties (remember “we won the war!”) and didn’t count Chinese at all – there was this “war between Japan and China” that was not part of WWII because WWII started when Poland was attacked.

  41. A. Noyd says

    Cat Mara (#36)

    there are inhabitants of all parts of the Anglosphere guilty of this kind of willful blindness

    Yeah, here in Japan, it’s definitely not just Americans who need a good smack upside the head. Ran into a British fellow in the dentist office the other day who asked me how I communicated with the dentist and was shocked when I said I could speak Japanese.

  42. Derek Vandivere says

    FWIW, I’ve been in Amsterdam since ’94. There have been some incidents of clueless Americans but the English (and the Dutch boys who come in from the countryside for a wild night in Amsterdam) are much worse.

  43. rietpluim says

    Jacqueline Davis Please p-l-e-a-s-e PLEASE do not blame bigotry on mental illness.

    Assholery is NOT in the DSM for fuck’s sake.

  44. says

    Derek Vandivere@52: Yeah, having visited Amsterdam myself once (for a stag party, I’m ashamed to say), I can sympathise. When the municipal government of Amsterdam decriminalised cannabis and sex work all those years ago, I think they were hoping that their neighbours (both in the Netherlands and in the rest of Europe) would note that the sky did not fall as a result, see sense, and do the same themselves. Alas it was not to be… and now they have to deal with hordes of assholes descending on their city to PARTAYYYY!!!1! I guess that’s what you get for expecting rational behaviour from people. ☹️

    By far the worst example of Anglophone bigotry I’ve ever seen, though, was on some piece of car-crash TV programming on a UK channel called something like What Goes On In X Stays In X where X was the name (since forgotten) of whatever island in the Greek archipelago was de rigueur for the discerning hormonal British beer-monster abroad that year. The part of the show I was able to stomach involved some guy who’d fractured his ankle on a dancefloor the night before. He’d been warned to rest up but as this would cut into valuable drinking and whooping time had simply gone about his normal business, trusting to painkillers and a near-continuous alcohol intake to dull the pain from a busted ankle that was rapidly disintegrating under the stresses of lurching from tourist bar to tourist bar. Eventually, his body goes “fuck this” and shuts down entirely, whereupon he’s dragged howling by his mates back to the medical centre he’d been discharged from 24 hours previously. That his injury is entirely self-inflicted garnered him about as much sympathy there as you can imagine, though the medical staff are perfectly polite– certainly more polite than I’d have been, given the near-continuous stream of racist abuse directed at them by the fucker. He spends the next few hours alternating between blubbering self-pity and racist outbursts while his blood alcohol level drops to a point where the medics can safely administer an anaesthetic and patch him up. The whole thing was depressing as hell– the empty hedonism and casual racism of the subject, the leering sanctimony of the programme-makers, me for watching it… I want those minutes of my life back, dammit!

Leave a Reply