Comments

  1. PaulBC says

    Moving video!

    The Harry Potter benefits and gains disorder venomous.

    I don’t have headphones and watched with the sound very low and autogenerated subtitles. It did fine with the English language narration, but came up with some amazing translations of the Spanish parts. “Harry Potter” is mariposa I think, which is about the limits of my Spanish. The quoted line actually preserves the cadences and reads like poetry to me, though it’s nonsense.

  2. leerudolph says

    The quoted line actually preserves the cadences and reads like poetry to me

    Without very much torturing at all, it can even be chanted (or sung) to the cadence (or tune) of “I am the very model of a modern major general”. At which point it becomes handy that the words are nonsense, because “venomous” is asking to be rhymed with “enemas”.

  3. Mobius says

    Very nice.

    I recall when I was in 2nd or 3rd grade, the monarchs were flying south and clustered on a small tree in our school yard. The teacher took us out to look at them. An incredible sight.

  4. PaulBC says

    leerudolph@3 Both are iambic, so you can fit a lot of things, but I may have heard Modern Major General too. Actually, it’s disappointing to get such a typical English-language meter out of misheard Spanish.

    Anyone know what the girl is really saying? Translation: “The butterflies represent the souls of the dead.” I think she starts with “las mariposas significan” She holds “que” for a while and that sounds like “gain.” The rest, I don’t know. I don’t hear “almas” (souls). Is she saying “ánimos”? Start around 1:45 in the video for this (I’m watching silently now, so that gives some lead on it.)

  5. Ridana says

    I always thought of monarch migration like salmon or something, where they were born in the US or Canada, and then after a summer, all migrated to Mexico or California to winter, and then go back to lay more eggs where they were hatched. And that seemed amazing enough.
    But it’s even more convoluted than that. In Feb/Mar, they mate and migrate out from wherever they wintered, lay eggs in Mar/Apr, and die. The eggs hatch, they do their metamorphosis thing, lay more eggs and die, all within about 2 months or so. Those monarchs lay eggs in May/Jun, and go through their cycle, then another generation is laid in Jul/Aug. After these generations emerge from their chrysalises, they only live for about 2-6 weeks, but the generation born in Sept/Oct are the ones that live to migrate south and west.
    So not only have the migrating Monarchs never been to their wintering grounds before, neither had their parents, grandparents, or great-grandparents. Yet they can still find the same trees their great-great-grandparents hung out on. I wonder if they leave some kind of scent markers they can pick up on once they reach the general area.

  6. PaulBC says

    So not only have the migrating Monarchs never been to their wintering grounds before, neither had their parents, grandparents, or great-grandparents. Yet they can still find the same trees their great-great-grandparents hung out on.

    Guided by the souls of their ancestors no doubt!

  7. Ridana says

    @ PaulBC: I think she is saying, “Las mariposas significan que…que son las almas.” But she kinda slurs a bit (“hariposas” “signifan”), and my Spanish is awful, so take it with a shaker of salt until someone who knows better speaks up. :)
    If that’s what she’s saying, I’d interpret that as meaning “the butterflies tell us that there are (i.e., we have) souls,” since she didn’t specify that they are souls of the dead.

  8. John Morales says

    Ridana, what I heard was “Las mariposas significan que… que son las animas.”

    (Also, my Spanish is Castilian (from Spain), so the accent is rather gross for me)

    Translation: “The butterflies signify that they are the spirits”.

  9. John Morales says

    Also, I am not sure whether the “pretty” in the OP refers to the butterflies (which I’ve always thought should be called ‘flutterbyes’) or the painted people. :)

  10. PaulBC says

    @9 That sounds plausible. Probably “que son las” was transcribed as “disorder” by the subtitling software.

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