The Pacific Northwest is full of witches


I knew that already. Now I have photographic proof.

They paddle along the rivers because it’s hard to fly when your broom is waterlogged.

Comments

  1. cartomancer says

    The traditional mode of water transportation for witches is, of course, the sieve. Macbeth, act 1 scene 3.

  2. slithey tove (twas brillig (stevem)) says

    That looks like so much fun, I’ll have to set up a trip to Portland next late October.
    By the pricking of my thumbs…

  3. robro says

    Hope no one falls in. I hear water is bad for witches. Well, at least Baum’s witch, but if Hollywood says a witch melts when splashed with water, then so it is. Thus spake Zarathustra, or somebody.

  4. says

    @cartomancer, #1:

    Waterproof sieves have a long history in mysticism. In ancient Rome, one of the major temples (I forget which offhand) would have the priestesses carry water in sieves — to demonstrate that they were virgins, IIRC, because of course those two things have so much to do with each other.

    (I’m told that the trick used to let it happen was to smear the sieves with grease.)

  5. mailliw says

    Some modern witches fly on vacuum cleaners rather than brooms.

    Those who have been freed from domestic servitude use Lear jets.

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