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Feb 15 2013

Let there be light.

Professor Miguel Nicolelis and his team, from Duke University, North Carolina, have used Infra-red light (which rats can’t see)to trigger brain implants and signal a rat to move in a demonstration of brain interface controls. The infrared sensors gave rats the ability to detect the normally invisible light. The research could help us to one day replace someone’s damaged senses, such as giving sight to blind people.

More details here.
Blind people will be able to see. What else do we need?

If rats can be given sixth sense, humans can be given sixth sense too.

I wish someday people would be able to just stop talking nonsense.

2 comments

  1. 1
    thebookofdave

    In the future, we will be overrun by bionic rats, capable of stalking us in the dark. And I, for one, welcome our new rodent overlords.

  2. 2
    Francisco Bacopa

    This is giving the rats a sense that many snakes have. Boas and many other snakes have heat sensing organs that allow them to determine the direction of their prey. The best infrared sensing organs of all are the pits in the pit vipers. They have dense concentrations of infrared sensors in two widely separated pits similar to the primitive “cup eyes” found in some animals. These pits allow the snake to determine both direction and distance, and form a good enough image to be able to strike their prey on specific parts of the body.

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