Well done, Bangladesh!


I am not a big fan of the T20 format of cricket where each side gets to bat for only 20 overs. Sure, it is very popular because it lasts only about three hours and thus is more commercially viable but it encourages batters to be hyper-aggressive and hit at pretty much everything, rather than play the judicious strokes that are the essence of the game.

Right now, the Asia Cup is being played in Bangladesh. where the nations vying for the trophy are India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, and the UAE. It was expected that the final would be from the top three teams, which are the first three in that list. But Bangladesh surprised everyone by beating Pakistan and Sri Lanka and will now play India in the final on Sunday, March 6th.

It is always wonderful to see underdogs do well and I hope that they pull off a major triumph by beating India, though that will be tough because India is a formidable team.

Their fine performance will give a big boost to Bangladesh in the World T20 championships that will take place in India starting March 8th. Eight teams (including Bangladesh) will play qualifying matches from which the top two will join Australia, South Africa, India, Pakistan, New Zealand, Sri Lanka, West Indies, and England in the final round of the competition starting March 15th with the final being played on Sunday, April 3.

Sri Lanka are the current World T20 champions, having won the last tournament held in 2014. But they are a much weaker team this year and I would be really surprised to see them make it into even the semi-finals.

Comments

  1. Raucous Indignation says

    I love baseball. Love it. The leisurely pace and the possibility of an endless, ongoing tie. Love. It. But holy crap-a-mighty cricket is slow. The cricket matches I attended, all one day affairs, made me pass out from boredom.

  2. says

    I am interested why an otherwise rational person such as yourself, Prof. Singham, feels concern about a professional national team’s performance. What makes you feel connected to their defeat or victory?

    It never made any sense to me why anyone cares about professional sports, other than tribalism or nationalism. How do you make an emotional connection between the little guys in the pictures, who are being paid to play a game, and “my team”?

    I do enjoy occasionally watching professional sports because they are so super darned good. And all the weird musculature from the performance-enhancing drugs is kind of fun to look at. It’s the emotional connection that makes no sense to me at all.

  3. says

    Holms@#3:
    “Why do you like things that I don’t like??” – shorter Marcus.

    Whether I like it is irrelevant, really. But that’s why I’m curious.

  4. Mano Singham says

    I started to reply but then thought that this question deserved a more thoughtful (i.e., lengthy!) response. So watch out for a post on it!

  5. StevoR says

    @ Marcus Ranum :

    I am interested why an otherwise rational person such as yourself, Prof. Singham, feels concern about a professional national team’s performance. What makes you feel connected to their defeat or victory?
    It never made any sense to me why anyone cares about professional sports, other than tribalism or nationalism. How do you make an emotional connection between the little guys in the pictures, who are being paid to play a game, and “my team”?

    You do realise Bangladesh isn’t Mano Singham’s team – nationally or really in any sense other than he likes to cheer on the underdog sides right? Mano Singham – like me – loves the game of cricket, a great sport which is immensely deep and emotionally powerful. But he’s from Sri Lanka and so cheers on the Sri Lankan XI and I guess given he’s a US resident I assume he also cheers on the American cricket team as well. Plus supporting others for various reasons besuides national pride such as wanting poorer underdog minnow nations to do well or having favourite players who he admires for their skill and other traits in other teams.

    I’m sure Mano Singham will have a good answer for you in more personal detail to him but that would be my understanding for you based on human nature and my life experiences.

    You don’t grok sport or national pride clearly Marcus Ranum. I put it to you that that is a flaw in your nature & psychology not anybody else’s. Of course we’re not all interested in all the same sports and levels of patriotism can and do vary and that’s not necessarily wrong either – although those without patriotism, who don’t identify with and support and cheer for their countries and peoples – not necessarily at the expense of others – are, I think lacking in empathy and commitment to their societies and arguably negatively strange.

  6. Holms says

    #4
    Then why the snide wording: “I am interested why an otherwise rational person such as yourself…” You very clearly indicate that sports fandom is not the domain of rational persons; I see no need for such scorn.

    (Before you ask, no I’m not a supporter of any team in any sport, and have not done so for years.)

  7. Holms says

    Sigh…

    #4
    Then why the snide wording: “I am interested why an otherwise rational person such as yourself…” You very clearly indicate that sports fandom is not the domain of rational persons; I see no need for such scorn.

    (Before you ask, no I’m not a supporter of any team in any sport, and have not done so for years.)

  8. Kenal-98 says

    I love the game of cricket myself and I would have to agree with most of what Mano has said about the T20 format of the game. I think it is mostly rollicking good fun for people who are unaccustomed to and/or generally uninterested in the game.

    My view is that the T20 format was designed almost entirely to appeal to people like Raucus at #1 who do not come from cricket mad and cricket tradition steeped places (India, Australia, England or the West Indies). As a West Indian (Jamaican) myself, I think the T20 format has actually been horrible for my team. My view is that T20 has hastened the already steady decline of the quality of West Indian cricket. The format just encourages batmsen to swing at every damn thing without giving much thought to what they are doing. So batting essentials and orthodox shots go out the door in exchange for improvised swings aimed at launching the ball as high and as far as possible. So generally speaking, while West Indies is pretty formidable in T20, we absolutely suck in the longer forms of the game.

    PS: I chuckled a little just now when I wrote “longer forms of the game” as a reference which includes ODIs. Things, times and changes.

  9. fentex says

    I dislike the overall tendency in cricket of recent times to favour batters simply because selling big hitting is profitable. The pitches are prepared flat to thwart bowlers, bats are bigger and heavier, and fielding restrictions invite hitting out.

    Bah and humbug.

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