Maybe Some People Shouldn’t Travel


I am definitely one of those pro-traveling people. I think that it does everyone good to get out of their comfort zone a little bit, realize that there is a big world out there with different people, different cultures and different points of view. Escaping ones own context every now and then leads to more well rounded individuals, and so I am happy rather than disappointed that traveling is becoming accessible to more and more people.

However, when I came across a list of complaints from British holiday makers, I realized that perhaps some shouldn’t travel after all.

While they are all rather amusing, the ones that made me really sad were the ones of this flavor

2. “It’s lazy of the local shopkeepers in Puerto Vallarta to close in the afternoons. I often needed to buy things during ‘siesta’ time — this should be banned.”

3. “On my holiday to Goa in India , I was disgusted to find that almost every restaurant served curry. I don’t like spicy food.”

10. “We went on holiday to Spain and had a problem with the taxi drivers as they were all Spanish.”

15. “There were too many Spanish people there. The receptionist spoke Spanish, the food was Spanish. No one told us that there would be so many foreigners.”

Hun, when you’re in Spain, you’re the foreigner

These people, perhaps, really shouldn’t travel. It seems that some people will never escape their own context, or realize that their culture is not the center of the universe, even if you plop them in the middle of Borneo.

This makes me sad. A little too sad for a light-hearted story. So, let’s lighten the mood with the last one at least.

19. “My fiance and I requested twin-beds when we booked, but instead we were placed in a room with a king bed. We now hold you responsible and want to be re-reimbursed for the fact that I became pregnant. This would not have happened if you had put us in the room that we booked.”

Comments

  1. says

    My favorite english person travel whine involved a friend of a friend who complained that the air in Arizona “made her nose dry up inside” to which the friend allegedly responded “Is the inside of your nose supposed to be soggy all the time?” Now when I am in england enjoying the mist I can’t help but thinking how nice it is that the inside of my nose is thoroughly hydrated.

  2. says

    After fifteen years of living abroad (from Canada) and travelling to various countries, I can say first hand that nearly all these places bend over backwards to be nice to foreigners, including the chauvinists. People in most countries are far more accomodating to our prickly and self-centred selves than they would be treated if they visited the tourists’ countries.

    Funny thing: Nearly all of the anti-foreigner sentiment and hostility I’ve experienced over the years wasn’t anti-white, it was anti-American. As soon I as I start speaking my barely passable French or people see my passport, they change their tune. The remainder of the hostility I’ve encountered is due to outdated thinking, not anything I’m doing wrong.

    • dianne says

      Interesting. I’ve never noticed a huge amount of anti-foreigner sentiment when I’ve traveled. At least, not directed against me. The AfD person I ran into explained how they didn’t mean me when they talked about the dangers of having foreigners in the country. French speakers apparently give me a pass for the effort when I try to speak French to them (though I must be nearly incomprehensible). The most negative statement or implication I got about being US-American was actually in Costa Rica where most people, on finding out where I was from, said something that implied “better you than me”. It seems that Costa Ricans think of the US as a place where everyone has to work hard continually and no one has any time to relax. Plus, nasty winters and bad fruit. It’s not an inaccurate view and showed more pity than hostility. Maybe I don’t travel adventurously enough to run into much hostility or maybe I’m just too oblivious to notice it.

  3. johnson catman says

    My fiance and I requested twin-beds when we booked, but instead we were placed in a room with a king bed. We now hold you responsible and want to be re-reimbursed for the fact that I became pregnant. This would not have happened if you had put us in the room that we booked.

    1) Does she want compensation for eighteen years or just enough for an abortion?
    2) Because a king-sized bed necessitates sex and guarantees fertility, whereas a twin-sized bed precludes both, right?

    And I agree with you that the people with all those complaints should not travel at all. It reminds me of the stereotypical traveler from the US when someone in a foreign country does not understand English, so the traveler speaks louder so that the message can be “understood”.

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