Why Freethought Blogs matters


I guess I’ve had a pretty combative and stressful couple of weeks on the ol’ blogosphere, with one thing and another.

But a humbling truth about this network is that whatever microdramas may be absorbing me from one day to the next, I’m never far away from writers and activists whose personal efforts for social justice and freethought put any activism and travails of my own  in profound perspective.

Kaveh has a new blog up that reminds me of why I am so proud to be on this network, and why this place is necessary. It is short, sad and sobering, please go read it.

My deepest sympathies go to family and friends of the victim of the latest theocratic atrocity in Iran, Mohsen Amir Aslani. My utmost admiration, as ever, goes to Kaveh Mousavi and all bloggers, journalists and writers who brave the risks of oppression, persecution or worse to bring us their news and views.

Comments

  1. mildlymagnificent says

    My heart sinks.

    I never know what to say in the face of this level of awfulness. I feel close to weeping and that feels wrong too. I suppose I’m not entitled or something – and this isn’t the sort of problem that a routine donation will help.

  2. Blueshift Rhino says

    “I’m never far away from writers and activists whose personal efforts for social justice and freethought put any activism and travails of my own in profound perspective.”

    You seem to have reversed the locations of “personal” and “social” in that sentence.

    (I’d also mention that this is a form of Spoonerism, but I’ve been told to avoid using dictionary definitions of words ending in “ism” around here, so I won’t.)

  3. johngreg says

    Ally said:

    I guess I’ve had a pretty combative and stressful couple of weeks on the ol’ blogosphere, with one thing and another.

    Condolences on the stress levels; stress sucks, and we so often, to our great detriment, do not even feel it.

    But a humbling truth about this network is that whatever microdramas may be absorbing me from one day to the next, I’m never far away from writers and activists whose personal efforts for social justice and freethought put any activism and travails of my own in profound perspective.

    I am with Rhino on this: you seem to have transposed “personal” and “social”.

    Kaveh has a new blog up that reminds me of why I am so proud to be on this network, and why this place is necessary. It is short, sad and sobering, please go read it.

    But it seems to me that the majority of the FTB bloggers with the highest recognition factors, do not cover serious issues like this anywhere near often enough. And when they do cover serious issues, like that which Kaveh is describing, they more often than not reduce them to little more than an angry kaffee klatch raging over priviledged white people issues.

    I guess what I’m saying is that I do not understand your overarching comment on how great, how necessary, how important the FTB network is. I have been folloing the FTB network since its creation, and I just cannot get behind your words: there is scant supporting evidence. While there are some FTB bloggers who I can learn from (such as yourself), the vast majority of them just seem to be insular, dogmatic, religious in approach, SJW/L fundamentalist in ideology, and ragey; more often than not, really ragey over teeny tiny things. Like the colour of cartoon bunnies.

    But you, Ally, are generally a shining beacon in a miasmic swamp — though, of course, you, like all of us, have some rather odd blind spots, but hey, that’s life; that’s people; that’s reality.

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