What Activist Burnout Looks Like — My latest for Splice Today

It looks like having a moment of panic every time you hear your phone ding because you’re afraid either trolls are threatening to beat you up on Twitter, or an argument in the comment section of your Facebook page has turned into an ugly shouting match.

It looks like staring at a thought-provoking article you found on either The Establishment or Everyday Feminism for five hours and debating whether or not to share it online because you’re afraid someone will accuse you of being a stupid SJW who hates white people (even though you are white).

It looks like wanting to hide in shame because when you tried to explain the complexities of modern feminism—including valid criticisms of it—all you get in return is a bunch of guys replying, “Feminism is cancer, you cuck!”

It looks like having to take a bunch of deep breaths about half an hour before correcting someone who says, “Black Lives Matter is a hate group.”

It looks like not getting anything done because you’ve spent the entire day explaining to a Facebook friend you don’t think all white straight cis men are inherently bad.

It looks like wanting to punch a baby in the face whenever someone demands you validate your gender identity with a peer-reviewed science journal article.

It looks like wanting to punch a baby in the face whenever, after explaining to someone the science behind gender identity, they respond, “Transgenderism is a mental disorder!”

It looks like gaslighting yourself and wondering if maybe they’re right and you’re just a special snowflake and not a transgender person.

Click here to read the rest.

Finding Family in the Atheist Podcast Community – My Latest for Splice Today

I didn’t expect to be a podcaster. After co-hosting the progressive Christian podcast Something Beautiful for two years, I got burned out and decided to hang up my headphones and stick with writing. Things changed in 2015, however, when I asked blogger Alex Gabriel for a blog interview. He wanted to do it through Skype, but I was too lazy to transcribe the conversation, so I started the Bi Any Means Podcast. I still didn’t consider myself a podcaster, though, until I started getting more guests and eventually joined a Facebook group for atheist podcasters. Turns out not only did people like what I was doing, but that I became part of a large family.

The first time I realized this was at Reason Rally 2016. It was my first atheist gathering, and also the first time traveling and staying in a hotel room by myself. On the night before the rally, I met podcasting friends in person at a bar, and it was surreal. Everyone that I’d just listened to week after week suddenly became real people. Not only that, but they actually wanted to talk to me. How’s that possible? I’m just some schmuck in Easton, MD with a nasally voice who has a handful of listeners. It was the first time I felt accepted at the popular kids’ table, and didn’t get any sleep that night because I was trying to process everything. That sense of acceptance continued the next day during the Rally as I met more atheist activists who not only recognized me, but also let me know I was one of them. I came home from that weekend feeling like I was no longer the Token Freak; I was part of a family.

Click here to read the rest. I must warn you; this is the first of several posts gushing about ReasonCon3.

We’re Not Alone in This Fight: My Latest for Splice Today

Besides having anxiety attacks over whether or not people will accept me as a non-binary trans person, I also had them all last week in trying to decide if I should attend a town hall hosted by Republican Rep. Andy Harris (MD-1). On the one hand, this would be a chance to make my voice heard and push for change. On the other, the Eastern Shore doesn’t take kindly to progressive queer trans people, so I was afraid I’d get hurt. I texted my friend Jim—a seventysomething hardcore progressive anti-theist who doesn’t take shit from anyone—to come along with me, and he agreed.

We arrived at Chesapeake College just after five to see a huge line outside. Jim and I chatted with people from Talbot Rising who were holding protest signs, which meant we weren’t able to get seats inside, so we stood in the back of the auditorium. I had a question for Harris written down on a piece of paper, but unfortunately missed the deadline to submit it.

The meeting began with a pastor reciting a Christian prayer (roll of eyes), followed by the Pledge of Allegiance (another eye-roll since it included “Under God”). Then Harris came onstage. He began with a short slideshow to make everyone believe that Obamacare ruined America, but the audience wasn’t having it. They booed, yelled, and demanded Harris skip the slideshow and go straight to the questions. At one point he told one woman in the audience, “Ma’am, if you don’t stop yelling, I’m going to ask you to leave,” but he quickly shut up when we all yelled in unison.

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ICYMI, Three Recent Splice Today Articles I Think You All Will Appreciate

As you may or may not know, I recently started writing for Baltimore-based website Splice Today which covers politics, art, and culture. Here are three recent articles I wrote for them that I think y’all might like:

Fear Builds Walls: How Pink Floyd’s The Wall Predicted Trump

Gender Dysphoria as a Still, Small Voice (It’s pretty emotionally raw, so discretion is advised)

The Failure of Classical Liberalism (Oh boy, this is gonna piss off the Free Speech Warriors!)

So yeah, hope you like them.