Bi Any Means Podcast #163: Fighting White Supremacy with Casper Rigsby

My guest for today is Casper Rigsby. For those that missed his interviews on both The Gaytheist Manifesto and the Inciting Incident, he is a former member of the Aryan Nation, and today I have him on the show to talk about a few questions that have been on my mind lately about effective means of combating white supremacy in America today.

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Bi Any Means Podcast #162: Activism in West Virginia with Tricia Shepherd

My guest for today is Tricia Shepherd. She’s the author of several LGBTQ-centered e-books—including “The Geek and the Prom King” and “Loving John Watson”—and is an active member of the West Virginia chapter of the Poor People’s Campaign. We’ve been Facebook friends for a couple of years now, and now I have her on the show to tell us her story.

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The Definition of Racism Doesn’t Really Matter — My Latest for Splice Today

Before I begin, I just have a few housekeeping items. First, as you’ll notice in the byline, my name is now Tris Mamone. Second, don’t let the title throw you off; the article is about how the debate over the “true definition” of racism isn’t doing anything to help solve institutional racism.

Now here are the obligatory intro paragraphs:

Once again, people are debating about whether people of color can be racist towards white people. It depends on how one defines “racism.” One side uses the sociological definition of racism, prejudice plus institutional power, and the other uses the dictionary definition, hatred towards people based on skin color. Which side is right? Does it even matter?

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines racism in three ways: believing one race is superior to all others, a system of oppression based on skin color, and hating someone for the color of their skin. The first and third definitions are the most familiar, and the ones David French of the National Review used in a recent article about Sarah Jeong. “A powerless person’s hate may not harm the powerful,” he writes, “but it is still hate… The essence of bigotry is to look at the color of a person’s skin and, on that basis alone, make malignant judgments about his character or worth.”

Read the rest here.

Bi Any Means Podcast #161: Ranting about Facebook Live on Facebook

Today’s episode is the audio from a live Facebook video I did this past Sunday where I talk about Facebook arguments, how I always end up upsetting someone when I try to have a serious conversation about racism, and anxiety over asking people to come on my show.

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Bi Any Means Podcast #158: Trans Rights Activism in Nashville with Dr. Marisa Richmond

My guest for today is Dr. Marisa Richmond. She’s a transgender activist based in Nashville, TN who, in 2016, became the first transgender woman ever appointed to a local government commission in Tennessee, nominated by Mayor Megan Barry and confirmed by unanimous vote to the Metro Human Relations Commission. She is also a professor in the history department at MTSU, and, in 2003, was the founder and first president of TTPC, the Tennessee Transgender Political Coalition. Today I have her on the show to talk about her life and her activism.

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The Biskeptical Podcast #51: #FamiliesBelongTogether

On today’s episode, we’ll talk about everything going on with the border crisis. We’ll go over the facts about zero tolerance, how the Trump administration justifies it with religion, and, yes, the jacket.

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The Biskeptical Podcast #49: Ambien’s a Hell of a Drug

Today’s episode is a news roundup episode featuring stories that can be best described as hot messes. We’ll talk about Elon Musk’s war against the media, Roseanne Bar’s racist tweets, and why Starbucks’ racial sensitivity training might not work.

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Bi Any Means Podcast #150: Black Women vs. Christianity with Deanna Adams

My guest for today is Deanna Adams. She is a co-organizer for Black Lives Matter Houston, and has an essay called “Black Women and Christianity: A Historical Perspective Part 2” in Karen Garst’s upcoming book “Women v. Religion.” Today I have Deanna on the show to talk about her life, her work, and about racial justice and humanism in general.

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Even Humanists Can Be Racist — My Latest for Splice Today

Last week, a white Yale student named Sarah Braasch called the police on black student Lolade Siyonbola for falling asleep in the student dorm common room. Siyonbola broadcasted the entire incident live on Facebook, and the story quickly went viral. Reporters immediately started looking into Braasch’s background, and found something disturbing: although she’s a humanist, she has a history of racial insensitivity.

In 2010, Braasch wrote an article for The Humanist about how she was assigned to defend slavery for a middle school debate, and won after bringing up the fact that some slaves didn’t know what to do after being freed. “[I]n the land of the free,” she argued, “who are we to tell people that they can’t be slaves if they want to be? Who are we to tell someone that she has to be free? Who are we to tell someone that she has to be regarded as fully human? It doesn’t matter that the alternative to slavery, which would mean walking away from everything one had ever known to recreate life anew without any resources, was regarded as healthier and more dignified. It was still the individual’s choice to make.”

Read the rest here.

Bi Any Means Podcast #149: Secular Activism with Debbie Goddard

My guest for today is Debbie Goddard. According to her bio, “Debbie Goddard is the outreach director at the Center for Inquiry in Amherst, NY. She is also the director of African Americans for Humanism. Before working for CFI, she participated in local freethought groups in the greater Philadelphia region and helped organize and support campus groups internationally as a student volunteer. She has also been involved with progressive issues and LGBT activism.” Today I have her on the show to talk about her life, her work, and about secular activism in general.

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