Bi Any Means Podcast #132: The Iranian Protests with Kaveh Mousavi

Returning to the show today is Iranian atheist blogger Kaveh Mousavi to talk about last week’s Iranian protests. As you’ll hear in this interview, Mousavi is a bit more skeptical of the effectiveness of the protests than Armin Navabi was last week on The Thinking Atheist. Consider my conversation with Mousavi as a companion piece to Seth Andrews’ conversation with Navabi. Hopefully between these two interviews, listeners will have a better understanding of the political situation in Iran.

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My Top Five Favorite Bowie Albums — My Latest for Splice Today

David Bowie gave all the Jean Genies of the world permission to let themselves go and be their true kooky selves. For the two-year anniversary of his passing, here are my top five favorite albums of his.

5). Earthling (1997)

Electronic dance music (EDM) was inescapable in 1997, so Bowie took the opportunity to reinvent himself once again for a new audience. The result is his most underrated album. From the drum-and-bass rhythm of “Little Wonder” to the industrial rock paranoia of “I’m Afraid of Americans,” Bowie proved he could survive pop cultural natural selection by adapting to the evolving musical landscape.

4). Station to Station (1976)

By the mid-1970s, Bowie removed the make-up and dresses for good, and introduced the world to a brand new persona: the Thin White Duke, a “very Aryan, fascist type; a would-be romantic with absolutely no emotion at all but who spouted a lot of neo-romance.” This character was less sex, drugs, and rock ‘n’ roll, and more cocaine, Hitler, and the occult. But even out of this chaos, Bowie was able to create the dancing star known as Station to Station, a synthesis of the American soul music of Young Americans and his follow-up Berlin trilogy. Highlights on this album include the funky “Golden Years,” the soft “Word on a Wing,” and the haunting epic title track.

Read the rest here.

This will probably be my only ST article for this week because I’m working on two articles for Ravishly, two interviews for the Bi Any Means Podcast, next week’s episode of the Biskeptical Podcast, and my portion of the workshop I’m co-leading at this month’s Creating Change conference.

This Week On Splice Today: Social Dysphoria and “Western Values”

Almost forgot to share what I wrote for Splice Today last week.

On Tuesday I wrote about how being a non-binary trans person in a gender binary world totally sucks.

And then yesterday I wrote about how human rights should be universal, not just “Western Values.”

Enjoy!

(BTW, since I mostly write for venues other than FtB, I’m not sure what the future for this blog will be in the near future.)

Bi Any Means Podcast #131: Top 10 Favorite Episodes of 2017

Today on the show I’m counting down my top ten favorite episodes of 2017. It’s a similar structure to last year’s best of 2016 episode, but because Spreaker doesn’t list most downloaded episodes in numerical order anymore and I’m too lazy to do the math myself, I decided to just list my personal favorite episodes from this past year instead. That way I can highlight episodes that didn’t get a lot of downloads.

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Bi Any Means Podcast #130: A Very Gaytheist Friendsmas

Today’s episode is the live Friendsmas show I was a part of on Christmas Eve with Callie and Ari from the Gaytheist Manifesto and Marissa and Aiden from the Inciting Incident. We talked about surviving the holidays as trans people when we’re stuck with reminders of who we used to be and not-so supportive relatives, plus a little bit about my struggle to give myself permission to be myself, along with a tangent about avocado toast for some reason.

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Bi Any Means Podcast #129: The Recovery Diaries—A Monologue

Today’s episode is going to be another monologue episode. Today’s going to be a very bare-bones episode where I talk about my drinking problem and the steps I’m taking toward recovery. It’s going to be pretty raw, just to give you all a head’s up, so you might want to skip this episode if you’re not in a good space. For everyone else—especially those struggling—I hope this episode will benefit you in some way.

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How Walk-It-Off Culture Delayed My Autism Diagnosis — My Latest for Ravishly

All the warning signs were there. I flapped my hands when I was excited. I watched the other kids play instead of joining them. I didn’t start talking in complete sentences until I was two. I’d get upset and smack myself in the head if something didn’t go as expected. Yet, every time my mother brought it up to the pediatricians, they always said, “Trav will get over it.” My mom, who was struggling to raise me after my father walked out on us when I wasn’t even a year old yet, decided to trust the doctors and wait it out.

There was just one problem: I didn’t get over it.

The meltdowns continued throughout school. If I couldn’t do something right, I had a meltdown. If the other kids called me stupid because I didn’t do something right, I had a meltdown. One time in first grade the teacher said something I didn’t like, and I had such a tremendous meltdown that they had to call in the principal.

Of course, the other children gladly took notice of this, so every day they pushed my proverbial buttons. Children already tend to repeat a certain phrase over and over again until they get a reaction from grown-ups, and that’s how they bullied me. Sometimes they would call me names over and over again, and sometimes they would threaten to beat me up repeatedly. It didn’t matter what they said, though, because it would always end the same way. I’d yell and scream and hit myself in the head. While the other children laughed, the teachers just said, “Knock it off! Don’t be a baby!”

Read the rest here.