The incredibly slow crawl towards self-evident truths about Islam


Douglas Murray once remarked on how incredibly slowly our societies crawl toward self-evident truths. It is an open question as to whether that crawl has been in any way accelerated by the brave and ceaseless efforts of ex-Muslims to bring our societies closer to those truths. It’s been hard to judge, not least because of the pervasiveness of the “Islamophobia” slur. In the Muslim world, ex-Muslims have been up for slaughter for a long time, in fact, since the beginning of Islam. Today, though, they bear an added social responsibility: turning that slow crawl of free societies towards the self-evident truth about Islam into a sprint. We are frustrated. Ex-Muslims are frustrated in that, by and large, Western opinion-makers, policy-makers, analysts, commentators, etc., are still not sufficiently interested in those self-evident truths — most remain not at all interested — though, thankfully, there have been some healthy developments of late. There’s been an increased readiness to look the truth in the eye after the social meltdowns in Scandinavia, Germany, the Netherlands and France, and especially after the latest artistic twist of ploughing vehicles at high speed into pedestrians. And now, in direct response to forcing an ex-Muslim citizen of a free country to cancel her speaking tour of another free country, thereby also forcing the free citizens of that free country not to listen to someone they’d freely chosen to listen to.

Please note that I’m not here referring to fear of violent Muslim reprisals (real as those are), or irrepressible mea culpa compulsions on the part of white liberals and leftists for the deeds of their fathers. I’m talking about the simple human reluctance to countenance uncomfortable or even nasty possibilities about other people’s religion. After all, we have freedom of religion, something we’re proud of and hold dear. It’s worked well up till now, on the whole. Why are we, ex-Muslims, so hell-bent on bad-mouthing Islam? Most commentators are not so foolish as to suggest that we don’t know what we’re talking about, although remarkably, some are. Nevertheless, it is a hard fight to get a word in, for most ears tend to be engaged in prior echo-chamber commitments. In light of all this, I would like to share another ex-Muslim’s frustrations:

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FN5Qv_c15Gw (Jajabor the nomad)

Update 8 April 2017: In the video above, Jajabor predicts that:

If we let Muslim lands be covered by Shari’a, they will unite and then they will start attacking us, because attacking non-Muslim lands, subduing them, these are all part of the Islamic faith.

Today, in my inbox, I find this report on the Saudi proposal yesterday, 7 April, for a single military force for all Muslim countries, as the Saudi minister for religious affairs, Sheikh Saleh bin Abdul Aziz, put it:

the KSA-led military alliance is for the protection and triumph of Islam, and for the elimination of the enemies of Muslims. He said this alliance will respond to all threats to Islam and fight against all those coming in the way of Muslims.

Make no mistake, every word means exactly what it says, especially “coming in the way of Muslims.”

“coming in the way of Muslims.”

Comments

  1. says

    I’m talking about the simple human reluctance to countenance uncomfortable or even nasty possibilities about other people’s religion.

    Where do you fit people who see it as a political problem, not a religious one, into your world-view? It seems to me that you’re being as dogmatic as a religionist, claiming that it’s all about religion. A political explanation fits better with reality, and it seems you’re trying to claim that people who take the political view are motivated by discomfort about tangling with religion.

    Blaming a cultural/political/religious clash entirely on one side’s religion is suspiciously simplistic. Maybe you are showing a reluctance to countenance uncomfortable or even nasty possibilities about culture, politics, and religion?

    • polishsalami says

      I’m not sure that Anjuli believes that religion is the only motivating factor for jihadis. As an ex-Muslim, she may tend to emphasize the religious aspect of this, but it is also true that Islam has significantly influenced the cultural and political landscapes of the countries it is practised in. Trying to untangle culture and politics from religion in Muslim societies seems nearly impossible.

      • says

        Thank you. And besides, I’ve already made my stance abundantly clear: in Islam, religion and politics are so intertwined as to be effectively inseparable. To a very large degree, religion and culture are also inseparable, which is why there is such a decimation of culture wherever Islam is imposed. I think Marcus needs to answer Jessie Foster’s questions.

    • says

      it seems you’re trying to claim that people who take the political view are motivated by discomfort about tangling with religion.

      How about I rephrase it just for your benefit: “I’m talking about one’s simple human reluctance to countenance uncomfortable or even nasty possibilities about other people’s religion”. Does that clear it up?

    • says

      Where do you fit people who see it as a political problem, not a religious one, into your world-view?

      Nowhere. They’re not my problem.

      It seems to me that you’re being as dogmatic as a religionist, claiming that it’s all about religion.

      So I’m naive, I’m disingenuous, and now I’m dogmatic. This list is going to become unmanageable if you don’t start proving them soon.

      A political explanation fits better with reality

      Which reality is that? The thousand murders a month committed by people screaming “Allahu Akbar”? Oh, no. You can’t fit those into your political explanation. So naturally, it’s not reality. Sorry it took me so long to get that.

      it seems you’re trying to claim that people who take the political view are motivated by discomfort about tangling with religion.

      I make no such claim, nor am I trying to.

      For the rest, see earlier comment.

    • says

      Islam is both a religion and a political system, and the two are hopelessly intertwined. It is no more possible to separate the political side of Islam from the religious side, than it is to separate the “nice” bits (which, in any case, amount to no more than common human values which can be derived from first principles, no deities required) from the “nasty” bits.

      Of course we like to think that people have the right to believe whatever they want. But there is believing and there is believing. There is saying you believe something but acting as though you believe the opposite (e.g. claiming to believe in creationism, while getting a flu jab every year — which you would not need in the absence of evolution — and setting your watch by an atomic clock — which requires radioactive decay rates to be constant, but radioactive decay rates must have changed over time for the Earth only to be a few thousand years old); and there is actually believing something fervently enough to act on it (e.g. doing your imaginary friend’s dirty work for him).

      It’s a difference of degree, not one of kind.

      If there really are some things that really are off-limits even just to believe, nobody wants to be the first person to admit it out loud.

  2. says

    @Marcus
    So what would it take for you to view it as a religious problem? I mean, Jihadists tend to go on and on about Islam. They’ll tell you, as they’re killing you, that they’re killing you for Islam. Are they all lying? Are they too stupid to understand their own motivations?

  3. snuffcurry says

    But what does killing other Muslims “for Islam” mean? Why would anyone accept such justifications without analysis?

    When white supremacist terrorists, in the act of murdering black men, accuse black men of raping white women, are we to simply accept that as fact?

    Why accuse people of being stupid when they are more often simply dishonest in the service of their own egos?

  4. polishsalami says

    snuffcurry #3:

    Only the mujahideen of [insert name of terrorist group HERE] are true Muslims. Ask someone from the Taliban if the folks from Al-Qaeda are true Muslims. This is how these people think: everyone outside their group is basically an infidel.

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