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Nov 08 2013

Snowden revelations decoded

The Guardian has a nice feature story that brings us up to date on all the Snowden revelations and what it all means for us, the ordinary person.

When Edward Snowden met journalists in his cramped room in Hong Kong’s Mira hotel in June, his mission was ambitious. Amid the clutter of laundry, meal trays and his four laptops, he wanted to start a debate about mass surveillance.

He succeeded beyond anything the journalists or Snowden himself ever imagined. His disclosures about the NSA resonated with Americans from day one. But they also exploded round the world.

For some, like Congresswoman Zoe Lofgren, it is a vitally important issue, one of the biggest of our time: nothing less than the defence of democracy in the digital age.

But the intelligence agencies dismiss such claims, arguing that their programs are constitutional, and subject to rigorous congressional and judicial oversight. Secrecy, they say, is essential to meet their overriding aim of protecting the public from terrorist attacks.

With the large number of programs being revealed, each with is own name, function, people, and acronyms, it may be hard to keep track of all of them. This article brings it all together in one place.

2 comments

  1. 1
    thewhollynone

    Well, I guess, if you can trust The Guardian to report the facts accurately.

  2. 2
    Parker

    @1 Are you suggesting the Guardian isn’t a reliable iutlet in this matter? If so, why?

    The EFF has a compiled a pretty good timeline in the general history of the NSA’s and FISA’s degression into this cluster fuck of a mess as well:

    https://www.eff.org/nsa-spying/timeline

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