The Obama administration’s contempt for transparency is breathtaking


It looks like the FBI is claiming that it has the right to read people’s emails and other electronic communications without a warrant, even though a federal appeals court ruled that it violated the Fourth Amendment.

Via Glenn Greenwald I learn that the ACLU had also submitted a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request to the Obama administration to obtain its policy of intercepting text messages sent to and from cell phones.

This is the reply they got from the Department of Justice.

Hilarious, no? A real knee-slapper from Obama, who promised to have the most transparent administration ever.

Again, one has to ask what the response of Democrats would have been if the Bush administration had pulled a stunt like this. Actually one does not have to ask. Some of you may be familiar with the acronym IOKIYAR frequently found on liberal websites. It stands for “It’s ok if you are a Republican and is used for things that Republicans and the media loudly protest about if done by others but accepted if done by Republicans. It looks like we also need IOKIYAD.

Comments

  1. coragyps says

    I think you got an Iranian Playboy magazine by mistake…

    That is disgusting.

  2. sobkas says

    >The Obama administration’s contempt for transparency is breathtaking
    After all, that is what waterbording supposed to do.

  3. voidhawk says

    That’s hilarious.

    Awful, but the sheer bald-faced cheek of sending an entirely blacked-out document back is worthy of something from Yes, Prime Minister.

  4. jamessweet says

    Oh, please, Mano, we all know that the administration’s REAL crime is that they had some spin doctors do some spin doctoring over Benghazi. Those are the IMPORTANT issues!!!!11!1!!!11

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