Republican Filth Getting What They Want: Denying Education To Urban Children Because Greedy White Racist Suburban Pigges Don’t Want To Pay Taxes



Under a draconian budget passed by the Philadelphia School District last month, none of these supporting players — aide, counselor, secretary, security monitor — will remain at the school by September, nor will there be money for books, paper, a nurse or the school’s locally celebrated rock band.

“I am worried sick,” said Lisa Ciaranca Kaplan, the principal, whose homey school in South Philadelphia serves 410 students, speaking 14 languages, all of whom qualify for free meals. “How do I relieve teachers for lunch if I have no one in the lunchroom? I’ll be the only person in this building who’s not in a class.”

Pink slips were recently sent to 19 percent of the school-based work force, including all 127 assistant principals, 646 teachers and more than 1,200 aides. Principals are contemplating opening in September with larger classes but no one to answer phones, keep order on the playground, coach sports, check out library books or send transcripts for seniors applying to college.

Comments

  1. unbound says

    Don’t worry, the job creators will be hiring all those kids at $1.50 / hour once they get the minimum wage abolished too. Living the dream in the good old USA…

  2. Brandon says

    The Wiki for the Philly school district puts their student spending at a bit over $15K per student, which is way above the US national average, and much higher than any country spends on education per student. Assuming it’s true that there wouldn’t be money for even basics like paper, where’s the money? Someone’s collecting $2.5 billion for Philadelphia’s education – who is it?

  3. Ben P says

    The Wiki for the Philly school district puts their student spending at a bit over $15K per student, which is way above the US national average, and much higher than any country spends on education per student. Assuming it’s true that there wouldn’t be money for even basics like paper, where’s the money? Someone’s collecting $2.5 billion for Philadelphia’s education – who is it?

    The NYT Article says to some extent, but doesn’t lay out details.

    “The troubles have many causes: rising pension costs, high debt payments for past borrowing that papered over budget gaps, a flight to charter schools and a block-grant formula for state aid that has fallen behind enrollments, which have increased 5,000 a year between charter and traditional schools, according to Mr. Hite.”

    In short, debt payments and obligations to pension plans, which have no doubt been underfunded in the past compared to the benefits they paid out. (In reality this is the problem with almost all pension systems. The state created a plan with paid out benefits of X, anticipating costs of Y, where Y is based on overly optimistic investment returns), they only paid in Y, but future obligations of X keep piling up and investment returns don’t match. Suddenly they find themselves with billions in unfunded obligations and someone has to kick in straight cash to keep the system afloat.

    However, the $15,000 figure, assuming wiki is accurate, paints the NYT article as not very even handed in its treatment. No one likes getting their budget cut, and the article paints a truly dire picture, but assuming that the city as a whole can’t vote more tax revenue, what options are there?

  4. 20yearsinphilly says

    Lower Merion 26K. Pittsburgh 21K. Philadelphia: 13K. Allentown: 11K. These were the spending levels per student in 2009-2010 (source: http://www.openpagov.org/school-spending/sdefault.asp). Philadelphia’s spending per student may look high compared to the national average, but what about LM? This district borders Philadelphia and spends twice what the PSD does per student. Philadelphia’s spending per student is about in the middle of Pennsylvania’s ~500 school districts, serves by far the largest pool of students and has all of the issues of any urban school system–poverty, crumbling infrastructure, etc, etc etc.

  5. Diraj says

    Hite is a politician like the rest blame it on the hard working teachers, aides, principles etc of their pensions. don’t blame it on the for profit charter schools who the politically connected ones were given about 60 million a piece to start theirs. Don’t blame it on the mismanagement of funds by the SRC when Robert Archie was the man in charge and dwight evans was the head of the procreation commitee. They know where the billions went. But don’t blame it on them always the hard workers and their pensions. How much does the tax payers pay for Hites medical versus a teachers medical. or the pension of retired upper echelon school officials. Retried politicians made well over a million dollars from their pensions so far. Upper echelons should first talk about their pensions before they talk about the true workers

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