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Fucken Dumshitte Redneck Imbeciles Are The Stupidest Motherfuckers On Earth

Yeah, let’s arm all the school employees with concealed weapons! Yeah, that’s the ticket!

An East Texas school maintenance worker was in fair condition Thursday after being accidentally shot during a district-sponsored handgun safety class, according to local media.

The concealed handgun license class is part of an effort to permit teachers to carry firearms in schools in Van, Texas, the Tyler Morning Telegraph reported.

KLTV identified the maintenance department employee as Glenn Geddie, and reported him hospitalized in fair condition.

These dumshitte loonie redneck morons can’t even keep from shooting their motherfucken selves, but they are gonna “protect the children” when another dumshitte loonie redneck moron comes blasting into the school with a motherfucken assault rifle?

Comments

  1. twosheds1 says

    Indeed. I’m surprised no one has proposed strengthening the physical security of school buildings, such as installing steel doors with small (or no) windows, and barred ground-level windows. Shootings, as awful as they are, aren’t really a widespread problem. A bigger problem, one that has affected my son’s school, is non-custodial parents taking their kids out of school. Basically, kidnapping their kids. This is something that is easilty solved by better physical security, rather than giving a teacher a gun.

    Speaking of which, my sister-in-law was assaulted by one of her third-graders recently. Luckily, no one was hurt. If she had a gun, how might that have ended?

  2. Phillip IV says

    An East Texas school maintenance worker

    …William McDougal, known throughtout the community as Groundskeeper Willie…

  3. DrugMonkey says

    They should have a squad of lovable pitbull guard dogs in the teacher’s lounge, all ready to respond to threats.

  4. unbound says

    Er, why the hell are they using live ammunition in a safety class? Absolutely no need for that unless you are at a shooting range…

  5. Sansgerd says

    Anyone else remember the video of that Sheriff giving a talk about gun safety in a classroom setting and ended up shooting himself in the leg halfway through? Yea, this reminds me of that.

  6. Grumble says

    This is why they invented the word, “dumbfuck.” Unfortunately we are living in a nation of dumbfucks.

  7. atheist says

    One thing I find helpful, when being forced to consider how utterly mad many Americans truly are, is to consider what it would be like to live in Pakistan. Doesn’t exactly make me feel better, but does force me to view my fellow citizens objectively.

  8. Grumble says

    Why is that helpful? Granted there are lots of Pakistans, but there is also Australia, where guns are pretty much banned and there are many fewer gun accidents and deaths than in our dumbfuck-istan.

  9. atheist says

    @Grumble – February 28, 2013 at 12:57 pm (UTC -7)

    I find it helpful because, here I am getting enraged by stupid fucking Tea-Baggers who want to arm school employees, right? But then I imagine having to deal with stupid fucking Taliban who want to shoot little girls in the face. The imaginative exercise forces a quality in my anger. It grows colder, more patient. I can then think more reasonably.

  10. brucegorton says

    Always remember, whenever you declare someone the dumbest person on Earth, someone else will stare at their screen intently, cross their arms and say ‘Challenge accepted’.

  11. Dark Jaguar says

    In recent years, I’ve gone fully in favor of gun control.

    That’s why this frightens me:

    http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2013/03/download-this-gun-3d-printed-semi-automatic-fires-over-600-rounds/

    Ever heard of 3D printing? I fell in love with these things years ago, even though I don’t have one. They are actually very benign, or WERE until this article. They basically allow you to “print out” any 3D shape you could want into a sort of plastic resin. The applications were obvious, I could design my own toys, replace small plastic parts on things around the house, or even just make my own recyclable plastic dishes, forks and such (you can remelt all of this back into the resin pool and use it again).

    The biggest threat this invention had until now was to copyright, as one could print out copyrighted toys, and the internet would see to controlling that being an impossibility. I suppose I had a failure of imagination by not thinking of a large plastic machete or something, but that seems obvious in retrospect as well.

    I never would have imagined someone would be able to design a fully functional GUN using one of these things. It prints out in several parts which must then be assembled, but apparently the latest one can fire many rounds and reliably. Further, apparently this group is now printing bullets.

    I have to say the pessimist in me says that if 3D printers catch on, ALL gun control law becomes utterly powerless, including the newly proposed gun control laws. If anyone can manufacture a gun at home and the patterns and instructions are available online, there IS no gun control law. This is just as true as the fact that copyright law protections on music and movies are currently impotent in the face of the internet’s existence. I’m sure everyone here is at least vaguely familiar with the RIAA’s steady decent into madness finding SOME way to stem the tide of piracy, with every last thing they’ve ever done not even putting a DENT in the process. About the only thing they’ve been able to do is convince people that legally owning media is a virtue, and try their very best to make buying music and movies easy and affordable. That’s to be commended, but let’s face it, gun control isn’t a problem because everyone has guns, it is a problem because ENOUGH people have guns that they are easy for the dangerous people to get them. Heck I don’t have any guns, and would never print one, but all anyone interested in a killing spree will need to do is download a model, hit “print”, assemble after it is done, and bam, traceless killing machine.

    As much as I love 3D printing, I may be forced to take the only viable position that would prevent this scenario, which is legally banning 3D printers. At least then only a few outlaws will have those machines, thus stemming the tide of printed guns out there. The banning will have to happen sooner rather than later, before 3D printers become cheap enough for anyone to obtain one.

  12. Grumble says

    Is it really that easy to make a fully functioning gun? Even gun manufacturers have a hard time getting it right.

    Then again, I guess a partially functioning gun can be worse than a fully functioning gun in many cases. I suspect that it will end up like the methamphetamine epidemic: dumbasses blowing themselves up because they’re playing with something very dangerous.

    Sigh. Well, I’m off to go dream about the Taliban.

  13. nothere says

    I’ve been thinking about 3-D printed hand grenades. Probably much easier than a gun.

  14. Ben P says

    I have to say the pessimist in me says that if 3D printers catch on, ALL gun control law becomes utterly powerless, including the newly proposed gun control laws. If anyone can manufacture a gun at home and the patterns and instructions are available online, there IS no gun control law.

    I’ll concede that there’d be a drop in barriers, but in all actuality, it is not really that difficult to convert a semi-automatic rifle (particularly a gas cyling one) into one that can burst fire or fire full automatic. It requires some experience with machine tools and some precision work, but isn’t something that say, a lot of car mechanics couldn’t master. And if someone were dedicated, it only would take a couple hundred dollars of investment and a spare shed to begin converting guns.

    But it doesn’t happen much because mere possession is heavily regulated, and unlicensed possession is quite illegal. Altering weapons is even more illegal and carries very heavy penalties. So I think you’re overestimating a bit.

    It’s also to a great extent quite a bit like color copiers. We’ve had photo-quality color copiers for a decade, which theoretically could make counterfeiting money much easier, but in reality it’s not much more common than it was because doing it well is much more difficult than you’d think. Even if a 3D printer could make guns from scratch, your average person probably wouldn’t be able to make much more than a saturday night special revolver.

  15. Ben P says

    I’ve been thinking about 3-D printed hand grenades. Probably much easier than a gun.

    Same principle.

    12″ of Steel Pipe and some end-caps from home depot + black powder widely available at any store that sells ammo = pipe bomb. A bit of home chemistry and you have a much more powerful pipe bomb.

    It’s literally something a 7th grader could manage if they had access to the materials. Yet it’s not really that common. Why would 3D printers make it a huge problem because someone could download schematics and print out a grenade shell?

  16. Eric R says

    Ill tell you why I would feel a little more comfortable here than in pakistan or seemingly most middle eastern countries. In the middle east a fucking machine gun is a goddamn party favor. The reason they fire their AK’s intothe air at weddings and such must be because bullets are cheaper than rice.

  17. nothere says

    @ Ben P:

    I wasn’t thinking of a plastic grenade shell, but a real pull the pin, 3 second delay grenade. I’ve seen printed objects made of sintered steel or bronze. Over breakfast this morning I worked out a cheap simple timer and an ignition devise. Not going to build such a thing, just thinking how it could be done. By the way, if you can’t get black powder for a pipe bomb, match heads work quite well.

  18. kemist, Dark Lord of the Sith says

    @12

    It is much easier and cheaper, right now, to build bombs (the elaborate, remote-controlled kind) than guns. With the advantage that you don’t even need a 3D printer.

    With the cheap, powerful and easy to use electronics available today, an ignoramus who’s never wired a LED to a transistor or heard of a Thevenin equivalent can buy a kit from arduino, download plans and code from the net and build an elaborate project within weeks.

    And it’s not like explosives are difficult to make. Most undergrad chemistry students I know have synthesized picric acid (in mg quantity) at least once. I have on occasion made things that could be much more dangerous should they be used as weapons.

    The thing is, it’s difficult to make these things safely without adequate installations and knowledge. A doofus trying to distil nitromethane or synthesize TNT would most probably blow him/herself up before he/she could constitute a threat to anybody else. Or their device might not blow at all or very poorly, as it happened to the Columbine shooters and many others who have attempted artisanal bomb construction for criminal purposes. Things as hazardous as bombs make for very bad first engineering project – if they fail, they often are the very last thing you’ll ever fail.

    Another thing is that it may be a bit awkward to test them adequately before use – people might wonder WTF you’re doing, what with all the noise you’re making, and stuff that gets delivered to your place. Anyone who is a bit familiar with engineering knows that most of the time and money spent in developing reliable devices is spent on testing, and for good reasons.

    I suspect the same is true of the “print your own gun” thing.

    If you do have adequate knowledge, experience and installations necessary to build and test reliable guns or bombs, then by definition you’re not doing anything remotely like something Joe Average could do as a hobby. It is not that common because it is not so easy or fast to engineer and build such devices in a reliable and safe way. I don’t think 3D printers will change anything about that.

  19. Ben P says

    http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2013/03/download-this-gun-3d-printed-semi-automatic-fires-over-600-rounds/

    Happened to stumble across this less than a day after I wrote the above. I think it illustrates what I was saying. A man who is already a professional gunsmith created a pattern for the “lower” (the guts) of an AR-15, used a 3D printer, and assembled it. It lasted 6 rounds They refined the design and made one that could fire 600+ rounds before it failed. And keep in mind these are professional gunsmiths. It demonstrates that it’s possible, but also proves the point that it’s a reasonably difficult process. Your average person off the street could maybe print and assemble a Saturday night special, but not much more.

    The article also did point out something which had not occurred to me. 3D printing WOULD make any magazine length restrictions utterly unenforceable except as on a possession basis. A magazine is literally nothing more than 2-3 pieces of stamped steel and a spring. That would e easily printed. And the stresses are not terribly high so realistically one could even be made out of resin or plastic without too much of a problem.

  20. kemist, Dark Lord of the Sith says

    3D printing WOULD make any magazine length restrictions utterly unenforceable except as on a possession basis. A magazine is literally nothing more than 2-3 pieces of stamped steel and a spring. That would e easily printed.

    Mmmm…

    Beware of things that look easy on paper.

    Assembling bombs seems even easier than that, and it turns out unprofessional devices generally have very poor performance, and that has not changed to any significant degree even with the information available on the internet, as some people feared.

    It also seems to me that people assume 3D printing could be done correctly, out of the box, by anybody on the street without putting any length of time in learning its quirks and bugs. To me that is extremely optimistic, to say the least. When you see people struggle with software that you’d think a four-year-old would be able to use within 5 minutes, you get to reevaluate what “user-friendly” means.

    There are lots and lots of “how-to’s” for several things available on the net. You can read on how to make stone knives, cook parathas, build a computer, or anything that you might fancy. But somehow none of these things can be done correctly without putting in the time it takes to make you experienced and knowledgeable about them to some extent, at which point you aren’t Joe Average anymore as far as this particular thing is concerned.

    Acquiring experience about something they have no background in takes a motivation and patience that most people lack. On the other hand, if you can easily buy those guns… More people will have them, since it does not entail any effort on their part. And I would think that this is the actual problem – lots of very deadly weapons in circulation in the hands of John Q. Public, not the few handcrafted weapons in the possession of the dedicated hobbyist.

  21. Ben P says

    Acquiring experience about something they have no background in takes a motivation and patience that most people lack. On the other hand, if you can easily buy those guns…

    I take a slightly different tack on this.

    The core idea of gun control is fewer guns = less gun crime. I suppose you could go even more general and say “gun violence” but true accidents (distinguished from killings that are post-hoc explained as accidents) are a small proportion of gun violence.

    One of they key points of contention between gun control supporters and the opposition is whether gun laws actually keep guns out of the hands of criminals who will use them. Now this isn’t a clean category because of things like crimes of passion, but ignore that for the moment and focus on pre-meditated crime.

    If we take it as a given that gun control laws will, by reducing the supply of available guns, increase the price. Like illegal drugs, endangered animals etc., there will always be someone for whom price is no object. THe real question is at what point does your average armed robber decide it’s easier to mock having a weapon or attempt robbery with a knife or something, rather than paying the price to obtain a gun.

    Now, in a hypothetical word 20+ years in the future where 3D printing is commonplace, what does that do to this equation? Can you reasonably enforce gun laws if someone with a computer and a $400 3D printer can manufacture revolvers in his garage?

  22. kemist, Dark Lord of the Sith says

    One of they key points of contention between gun control supporters and the opposition is whether gun laws actually keep guns out of the hands of criminals who will use them. Now this isn’t a clean category because of things like crimes of passion, but ignore that for the moment and focus on pre-meditated crime.

    I would question the whole idea of separating the human species between “criminals” and “good people”, even if you redefine a criminal as one who premeditates a crime. In what category would you place a depressed and desperate person with no criminal file who planifies the murder of the employer who fired him/her ? The Columbine shooters ? Adam Lanza ? Valery Fabricant ? The guy who kills his wife and kids and then himself because he can’t handle divorce, leaving a letter written days before the deed explaining his actions ? Add those cases and it begins to make up a very important fraction of gun crime, by people you could not describe by any stretch of the term as habitual criminals – members of the Mafia / street gangs, drug dealers, professional thieves. People with well-padded criminal files.

    If we take it as a given that gun control laws will, by reducing the supply of available guns, increase the price. Like illegal drugs, endangered animals etc., there will always be someone for whom price is no object. THe real question is at what point does your average armed robber decide it’s easier to mock having a weapon or attempt robbery with a knife or something, rather than paying the price to obtain a gun.

    I live in a place where gun control laws are stricter, so I can tell you what we observe. People who commit armed robbery are often the desperate kind – a drug addict or gambler with no money left is the typical perp. What we see is often:

    - Yes, people who mock having a weapon, because they’ve never had and never will have the kind of money it takes to procure a real weapon

    - People who use a knife

    – People who use the legal 22-caliber or air pistols, which can do a lot less damage than a real firearm.

    As a result, it is quite rare here that people, including cops, are killed or grievously wounded in armed robberies. When it happens, it’s that the cop has shot the thief he believed had a weapon, and that is always grounds for an external inquiry here.

    I would think that is a net positive over having a kind of arms race between the desperate drug addict and the small business owner to see who can pack the most heat, with the mounting mutual fear making shooting first and asking questions later a more and more attractive idea for both participants.

    Now, in a hypothetical word 20+ years in the future where 3D printing is commonplace, what does that do to this equation? Can you reasonably enforce gun laws if someone with a computer and a $400 3D printer can manufacture revolvers in his garage?

    That’s the whole idea I’m questionning – that such artisanal production might match the quantity, reliability and deadliness of industrially produced weapons for a comparable price, and this with minimal competence on the part of the printer operator. A dedicated hobbyist building a single prototype is one thing, streamlining a process for mass production is quite another kind of problem, and one that people unfamiliar with engineering often underestimate.

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