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Oct 28 2011

Setting Professional Limits

Typical overachiever paranoia: if I don’t agree to do *EVERYTHING* they’ll get *MAD* at me and take it *ALL* away. Life doesn’t work that way.

They want you to do more and more because you are good at it and get it done without constant oversight. You really think that if you establish a limit, they are going to just say, “Fucke this guy, if he won’t give me everything I want, then even though he is totally competent and self-regulating, I am going to tell him to take what he does provide and shove it all up his ass, and then start looking for someone else to take it all on, who might suck completely and be a complete disaster. Yeah, that’s my plan!!!!”???

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  1. 1
    ?

    ???

    um, okay.

  2. 2
    DrugMonkey

    Right on. (except any of my postdocs that might be reading this.)

  3. 3
    speedwell

    No, the alien beings in Human Resources (they are not like us) think, “Oh, she isn’t performing according to our unreasonable expectations. Let’s string her along until we find someone we think, based on their extravagant promises, will perform miracles as we dictate, and then we’ll cheerfully bid her good luck in her next job opportunity.”

  4. 4
    mk

    you might have heard of a story about two donkeys. One of them was lazy and didn’t wanted to carry any load and other was obedient and hard working and carried as much load as he could practically. One day the master got another job with more load to carry, guess which donkey he used to carry this extra piece of load? the one who had very little or the one who already had too much on him? Of course, the second one. the idea is that if he could carry already this much, he could carry little more….

  5. 5
    PalMD

    There’s something to be said for direct, pithy statements. I’d like to put this one on a card in my pocket, and on the other side, print “fuck you”

  1. 6
    saying “no” FTMFW | Balanced Instability

    [...] with A LOT is the fact that I'm not great at saying "no" (but I'm trying). Physioprof has an insightful perspective on how feeling like you can't say "no" is a load of crap. But when your department Chair is sitting [...]

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