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  1. raefn says

    Somehow, it reminds me of Australian Aboriginal imagery that I’ve seen. I did an image search of Australian Aboriginal art. The shades of brown, the stripes, and the white patterns are a bit similar.

  2. Lars says

    Am I the only one who thinks this looks like StrongBad?

    Am I the only one who thinks it’s got the face of a cuttlefish? >;)

  3. rustiguzzi says

    Sili@5: Yes, put me in mind of Noface in ‘Spirited Away’ too. According to comments on the International Movie Database (IMDb) site, that character resembles a silkworm, not only for its voracious appetite, but the facial markings on its head and its real mouth below them. I wonder if the creature in the picture is related to silkworms.

  4. Frenzie says

    National Geographic quite annoyingly and consistently misspelled imperialis. But worse, the Internet seems to suggest that the pink underwing moth is actually North American, and that the Phyllodes imperialis is called the imperial fruit sucking moth. The wingspan of 130-170 mm is in accordance with the National Geographic article.

    Can anyone who knows more about (Australian) moths help figure out this mess more definitively?

  5. Roberto Aguirre Maturana says

    If that is a case of batesian mimicry, I don’t want to find the original creature that is being imitated. Actually, I do want to find it, but from a safe distance.

  6. Trebuchet says

    @11:

    National Geographic quite annoyingly and consistently misspelled imperialis.

    That would be Australian Geographic. Probably a spellcheck/autocorrect problem.

  7. Frenzie says

    @14
    Alas, just when you think there’s not much you can mess up in a quick note.