And the Thanksgiving Molly goes to… »« I get email

This is not my New Year’s resolution

I don’t make them. But I will lose more weight this year. Out of fear.

I was just at the grocery store, standing in the check-out line, which has become a gauntlet of terror. It’s the magazines.

Today, it was Paula Deen, round-cheeked and grinning, teeth bleached white, eyes like cold blue LEDs, photoshopped into perfectly plasticky plump grandmotherliness — a grandma with the complexion of an irradiated sixteen year old, glowing and sparkling — and she was holding a bowl of livid yellow macaroni and cheese that was bigger than her head. And I said to myself, this is the new face of death. And I said to myself, this is the American face of death, the death of viscid excess, the death that ends not in bones, but a quivering mass of adipocere. And I said to myself, don’t piss yourself, Myers, but that’s goddamn terrifying.

And I thought about buying that magazine and pasting that freakishly leering face on my refrigerator, but decided that placing a potent ward in my kitchen that would cause me to starve to death instead probably wasn’t a good idea.

But this is not a New Year’s resolution.

Tomorrow, it’ll probably be the Kardashians, and I’ll vow to Read More Books; or closeups of some starlet’s cellulite, and I’ll vow to be Less Superficially Judgmental; or creepy weepy exposes of a dying actor’s final hours, and I’ll vow to Crawl into a Cave When it’s my Time to Die. You can learn a lot from the supermarket checkout line, but mainly you learn that there’s a side of humanity that makes a fellow ashamed to be a humanist.

Comments

  1. Irene Delse says

    @ scriabin:

    But another good message from Pollan (I think) is to try to not eat food that your grandparents wouldn’t recognize (in other words, ease up on the processed crap). Hopefully that is a *little* more realistic a goal for many folks.

    Ho, hum. Not buying that one. My grandparents on my mother’s side would not have recognised as “food” any kind of spicy preparation. They were also of the opinion that you shouldn’t give any solid food to someone who had a cold, only very thin broth. But they considered that an ungutted, half-decomposed bird (“gamey”, if you want to use the technical term) was the tastiest of savouries!

  2. Beatrice, anormalement indécente says

    People not knowing how to cook… It seems really weird to me. I used to watch my grandmother cook and help with cleaning and chopping things. She also taught me how to do the simplest things, like cooking pasta or rice. Then I started reheating things when I was alone (e.g. reheating previously made sauce and cooking pasta), which casually progressed into making bigger parts of the meal. At about 16-17, I was regularly making full meals. Except for the very basics, I mostly taught myself. Mum was never a very good cook. After grandma’s death, mum insisted on cooking in exactly the same way grandma did. Which gave us some really bad lunches when mother’s lack of cooking experience combined with grandmother’s rather bland recipes. Grandmother grew up poor and was always careful not to spend too much on food, even when she could. We also had (still have) our own garden. Let’s just say that I ate a lot of cabbage in my youth. I’m starting to hate it a bit less now. We still make sure not to waste food or spend too much and I can make pretty decent meals from very little. I’m not pretending to know how it is to be poor, but I have a bit of knowledge about cooking on a budget. Not as small a budget as it’s been talked about previously, but with that knowledge in the back of my mind that we’re supposed to eat this for two days and it would be great if I didn’t spend much on it and didn’t waste anything. More from a habit than need, but it’s still there.

  3. says

    Jadehawk:

    (and the “try not to eat alone” chapter).

    If I never ate alone, I’d starve, seeing as I’m alone most of the time and not a social type*. That sort of thing is silliness for me, but I can see it being good for other peoples.

    I loved Botany of Desire, liked parts of The Omnivore’s Dilemma, but took most of it with a large helping of salt. Generalizing about food and food habits, eh, I don’t care for that much.

    *I’m not a fan of trying to eat and talk/socialize at the same time. When I’m hungry, I prefer to simply eat.

  4. scriabin says

    @ Irene – I agree with you from that end of it. But I think the point is simply to try to be skeptical of overly-processed food, rather than to ignore food of different cultures/countries (and better ways to cook!).

    @ Beatrice – Very nicely summed up.

    @ Jadehawk – Okay. I certainly don’t agree with everything he writes. But I would rather have policy makers listen to him (privilege and all) than to ADM. If you want to attack America’s nutritional woes, have a go at big agribusiness.

  5. The Laughing Coyote (Papio Cynocephalus) says

    However, I have never owned or used a cutting board until this past week. (I cut everything on a clean extra plate. My partner considers me a cutting-board Philistine.)

    As a knife knerd, this made me shudder. Not only is the sound atrocious, you’ll dull your knives! Knife abuse is one of the mortal sins in the TLC bible.

    However I’m glad to see you’ve seen the light. Crom smiles upon you from his mountain!

    Anyways, I had no idea that knowledge could be a form of ‘privilege’ too. I can’t imagine not knowing how to cook either, like many posters here. Even as a very small child it seemed important to learn.

  6. a_ray_in_dilbert_space says

    Cooking beans: Seriously, get yourself a pressure cooker. You will cut your cooking time down by a factor of 4 or more. You will not have to worry about all that soaking, etc.

    Also, don’t be intimidated by the variety of beans. Most of them are good. When I was in grad school, it’s what I lived on. And no, they will make you no gassier than most other foods.

  7. Classical Cipher, Murmur Muris, OM says

    I didn’t know there was a risk of making my beans poisonous?
    Help?

  8. carlie says

    scriabin – not to pick on you more, but I loathe Jamie Oliver. He marches into a place, declares everything they eat rubbish and sanctimoniously tells them what they ought to eat and that they’re horrible people who are killing themselves and their children. His lunch programs have been a failure that has caused kids to actually eat worse because he thinks he knows exactly what everyone should do and won’t listen to anyone else.

  9. says

    Thats kidney beans (and a couple of others probably). Soak em overnight, then 10 minutes of boiling and you’re good. I doubt you would want to eat them without doing that first anyway. Not if you like your teeth.

    Pteryxx you are making me hungry!

  10. scriabin says

    Carlie – fair enough! Bad example, I guess. I confess to not knowing enough high-profile individuals who are out there in the public eye trying to engage people (and governments) about good, healthy food that *should* be made available/affordable to all. For all of Pollan’s and Oliver’s warts, I’ll give them some respect for some of their basic ideas and – at least – for identifying some core problems.

  11. Pteryxx says

    *hugs TLC* I knooow, but you’ll forgive me for abusing my knives because you’re SUCH an awesome guy. *ruffles hair* (Crush? What crush? <_< )

    How does one sharpen serrated knives of miscellaneous provenance, anyway, or do you go to a professional for that? There's a truck stop between here and Dallas where a knife sharpener works.

    Anyways, I had no idea that knowledge could be a form of ‘privilege’ too. I can’t imagine not knowing how to cook either, like many posters here. Even as a very small child it seemed important to learn.

    That’s so true. It’s just invisible until you need it and don’t have it, like other forms of privilege. We really need some sort of food education as a survival strategy, like sex ed. People are GOING to eat; they should know how to go about it.

  12. The Laughing Coyote (Papio Cynocephalus) says

    Oooh… serrated knives. Those are hard. Ideally, you’d have a set of little files to fit all those serrations and sharpen them individually. I’m not too much of a knife knerd to realize that this is a huge pain in the ass and miles beyond the practicality of someone who just wants a sharp knife for food prep. I say go to a professional. If it’s really fine serrations though, I say just ignore them and sharpen them right away. A friend of mine gave me an old kitchen knife his grandfather had used on a farm for generations, and if you look closely at the blade you can see that it used to be serrated.

    As an aside: This is why I HATE all those ‘survival knives’ marketed with serrations. Those serrations serve one specialized purpose: Cutting seat belts. That’s it. That’s literally it. Those serrated sections for ‘survival blades’ are for cutting seatbelts, say if you’re trapped in a vehicle, and nothing else. Most people don’t even know that. Hard as hell to sharpen at home, literally impossible if you’re actually ‘surviving’ with it.

    We really need some sort of food education as a survival strategy, like sex ed. People are GOING to eat; they should know how to go about it.

    Yes, exactly! Eating is like, a basic survival skill of all living organisms. I find it absolutely ridiculous and disturbing that people would lack for basic knowledge like that.

    This is absolutely not meant to be a judgement on those people, btw, but it is a huge judgement on the society that let it get to this point.

    I must also say, I had no idea I made such an impression on you.

  13. Pteryxx says

    I must also say, I had no idea I made such an impression on you.

    It was some TETs back when you were talking about not being attractive because of your ranginess and “dark brooding predator stare” or some such, while shyly showing off your first carvings. I’m not picky, but *swoon*

    BUT ANYWAY! TOPIC!

  14. The Laughing Coyote (Papio Cynocephalus) says

    In my experience, besides the meat, buying dry pasta was always smart. It doesn’t go rotten, and you can add stuff to it. Whether simple or complex. At the very least I could make pasta and throw some milk and cheese in it. I suppose Mikey up there would also choke to know that the cheese I bought in those days were gouda and swiss! Expensive as hell and I had to carefully ration myself, but grilled cheese never tasted so good. It was worth it. To me, quality is always paramount over quantity (within reason).

    The food I ate made me happy. It made life suck less. If it did that for me, it was money well spent. And you know what else guys? Seeing Mikey throw a fit over poor people eating lobster just made me retroactively enjoy all that good food just that much more.

    Every time I eat a fine chunk of meat or nice cheese or something that doesn’t taste like garbage, I’m gonna think to myself “Some privileged country club asshole thinks this stuff is too good for me!” from here on out, and it will taste even better. Every bite will be like spitting in their face.

  15. carlie says

    That is one thing I’ve never regretted spending the money on- I bought Spouse a Wusthof chef’s knife once for his birthday (shorter one, 6 inch, 7 inch?). It is a joy to slice and chop with, and since it’s a straight edge I can do a decent enough job sharpening it with a knife sharpener (I know, I should use a stone, but I just don’t have the gumption to deal with it). We have all crap knives, but that one nice one is enough for pretty much all the big jobs.

  16. carlie says

    Wow, and holy crap have they gotten more expensive! (inflation, I do not notice it) I think when I bought that knife, it was around $50-60. Now it’s on amazon for $100. I don’t know that I could bring myself to spend that much on a knife now.

  17. RahXephon231 says

    @carlie (oh, and Jadehawk, and Caine)

    Word on the Pollan/Oliver hate. Both are rich white guys giving paternalistic advice on how people not only should eat, but how they’re supposed to be eating as if there’s only one correct way.

    Jamie Oliver gets extra stupid points. In his show he basically went in, called the cafeteria workers monsters, and tried to get them to replace the food they could actually afford (in an understaffed, underfunded school system like America has) to prepare with expensive, complicated shit with organic vegetables that the kids didn’t even fucking want to eat. Something Jamie would know if he even spent one goddamn second of his privileged-ass life asking someone else what they wanted to eat.

    I don’t even give him props for trying, no “E for Effort”. His attempts to help made everything worse. That show was no better than white Westerners with imperialistic attitudes giving “charity” to people in poorer parts of the world, and it’s crap those poor people end up never using because they don’t need it or it’s impractical, and it happens because those Westerners assume they know what those people need better than they do.

    Sorry, Jamie just causes raaaaaaaaage.

  18. The Laughing Coyote (Papio Cynocephalus) says

    Carlie: I’m willing to spend a fair bit on a quality knife because a quality knife is one of those investments that stays around for a while, provided you care for it properly.

    In the knife world, lots of what you pay for is quality, true, but just as much is in brandnames and marketing. It’s possible to find good quality knives for a good price. Just gotta have an eye for quality.

    As for sharpening, I feel your pain. It’s only recently I’ve become competent with a sharpening stone.

    Unfortunately, that’s about as useful as I get with kitchen knives. My main interest is in bushcraft blades/tools and straight-up weapons (though interestingly enough, many of the spanish Gaucho fighting knives look exactly like typical kitchen knives with fancier handles.)

    I do know however that while carbon steel is preferred for most other knives, stainless is definitely better for a kitchen knife. Should be sharp enough to slice, but heavy and strong enough to go through chicken bones and whatnot. And I can’t stand really flexible kitchen knives. If I’m trying to cut something difficult and that stupid blade is flopping and flexing around instead of going through, it’s not a knife. It’s a piece of metal.

  19. Tethys says

    Did anyone mention there’s good eatin’ on a turtle?

    Ramen Brutha! Or perhaps Booya!*

    Frogs are tasty, though I’ve never tried catching my own.

    After reading the latest thread comments I think I am going to use the xmas duck carcass to make some soup. I too am very privileged in having been expected taught to cook from a very young age. I guess the Mennonite heritage is very useful once you escape the hellfire and damnation clause.

    *Booya used to be a common small town fair food in this area. It is a rich, delicious soup. Snapping turtle and ox-tails are key ingredients.

  20. The Laughing Coyote (Papio Cynocephalus) says

    Catching frogs efficiently with a gigging stick is all about technique. For mine, I watched the mighty heron. They stand and watch, unmindful of wet feet or bugs. They line up their shots carefully, and when it’s time to shoot their spears (I’m glad mine didn’t grow out of my face), no hesitation. Nice, straight, swift, precision jab from fairly close range. When you’re doing it right, you feel it.

    I’m sad to report that I never did get quite as good as that old heron who shared my frogging territory though.

  21. The Laughing Coyote (Papio Cynocephalus) says

    (completely off topic by now)

    I’ve already resolved to eat frog again next spring. There’s a few areas here infested with bullfrogs.

    Fried bullfrogs. Now that’s some good invasive species! Not only do they taste good, I get to help out the pacific treefrog and northern red legged frog with my predation. Pacific treefrogs are a bit of an emotional attachment for me. It’s not spring until those little guys start singing about sex. The first band I ever liked, too!

  22. Irene Delse says

    Scriabin:

    But I think the point is simply to try to be skeptical of overly-processed food, rather than to ignore food of different cultures/countries (and better ways to cook!).

    On that I can certainly agree. It was the “things were better/more sensibly done in the old time” meme that I was objecting to. Previous generations had some wacky ideas about food. (Sometimes, I wonder what current received idea the next generation will shed – and what new ones they will invent.)

  23. Cannabinaceae says

    I suppose it’s easy to dismiss or ridicule Paula Deen (or at least the media’s or her own processing of her into whatever brandable entity she is), and to be sure, her style of cooking doesn’t appeal to me (except for chicken fried steak, ‘pon which she had a smackdown with Bobby Flay once, tho’ I don’t remember the outcome).

    However, lo these many yarns ago when we were actually paying for Hundreds of Channels of Crap plus Food Network, she was guesting on some show or other, and the main host or some other guest was demonstrating his cuisine. It was so uncomfortable to watch (I only managed a few moments), because Main Host or whoever kept saying the most patronizing things to her, but Paula always came back with some (exquisitely genteel) zinger that put the oaf in his place and he didn’t even realize what was happening (unless it was scripted that way, but I didn’t get the feeling it was).

    And speaking of CFS and Obesity in America, I finally (well my good friends in Allentown did) found another non-chain diner that serves it! (Queen City Diner, IYWTK). I was just there this Arbitrary Orbit Position day, and was horrified/fascinated/depressed to witness what appeared to be a family of three enter the place: Grandparent, estimated 500 lbs, Parent, est. 400, and Child, est. 300, like a tableau of fate. Plus, ashamed at my horrification/fascination/depression.

  24. Ms. Daisy Cutter says

    Let me add a little more Pollan hate: He supports Whole Foods, which is classist and fatphobic. And he says that U.S. society “needs Moms” to cook for it, meaning that women who are already burdened with the “second shift” of childcare and housework should take on yet more unpaid and unvalued labor.

    As for food that my grandparents wouldn’t recognize as food, Irene (#523) is correct that Pollan overestimates how healthful food was in Ye Goode Olde Days. Also, there are lots of young adults about now whose grandparents were raised in the age of canned foods and TV dinners.

    I wasn’t aware of the body shaming that Jadehawk brings up at #499, but it doesn’t surprise me. Rich white food activists have a shit-ton of privilege issues. And, sorry, Scriabin, but I don’t think it has to be a binary choice between the ADMs and the Pollans. Those who’d like to get more people on board with sustainable and healthy eating would do well to get out of their bubbles and start dealing with people as they are, not people as the food activists would like them to be.

  25. says

    *I’m not a fan of trying to eat and talk/socialize at the same time. When I’m hungry, I prefer to simply eat.

    This is so me as socially anxious introvert with a live-in S.O. Add my current dental issues and you have a lady who’s so terrified to eat in public that we rarely go out to eat unless I can be sure that we can get a tucked away booth and S.O. warning me if the waiter/waitress is approaching the table.

    Can I confess that I hate dealing with onions so much that I tend to leave them out of recipes? I’ll take my lashings…

  26. changeable moniker says

    @TLC, you are My Side of the Mountain. That’s cool. ;)

    cm’s basmati rice (and it *has* to be basmati). A half-arsed hybridisation of my ex’s Malaysian mother’s “do it in a rice cooker” and my “cook it in lots of water” heritage. For 2-3 people:

    (1) Pour 1 1/2 cups basmati rice delicately into an 8-inch saucepan. (Goal: don’t break the grains.) It’ll be about 1/2″ deep. If it’s not, make it so. ;)

    (2) Add 1″ cold water and delicately swoosh about with the backs of your fingers for a minute or two to loosen the starch on the outside of the grains. Run in more water and gently mix to bring the starch out. Drain water, keeping rice in the pan.

    (3a-c) Repeat (2). Seriously: at least another 3 rinses, maybe more if the water is still coming out cloudy.

    [By now the rice shouldn't be white, it should be a pale beige, and should smelly somewhat nutty. Tilt pan, mop up excess water with kitchen roll and leave for a while: half an hour is not unreasonable and it seems even better if cooked from dry-ish. If making something to go on top, this is your time!]

    (4) Boil a big kettle of water. If required, add frozen peas (shush!) to the rice. Pour water over rice and add salt (a little more than you’d think–it’ll be rinsed off later–but experiment). For a half inch of rice, there should be three inches of water. Stir gently and put on fairly high heat with the lid on.

    [From here on in, you have ten minutes during which you cannot leave the stove. Sorry.]

    (5) Boil another big kettle of water.

    (6) When the pan starts to bubble (the merest hint of tiny bubbles), open the lid a quarter-inch and turn the heat down so it continues to barely-bubble.

    (7) Put a timer on for 8 minutes.

    (8) If the pan starts boiling too much, crack the lid open a bit more. If it goes “dead” (no bubbles), turn the heat up a smidge. Stir *very* gently once or twice during the 8 minutes.

    (9) When the timer goes, start tasting. You want it to be *just* slightly underdone. Re-boil the kettle from (5).

    (10) Remove from stove (and turn it off!). Drain rice through a colander. Rinse the pan with a bit of the boiled water to get the last bits of rice into the colander, then rinse the rice in the rest of the water. Gently fluff with a fork. Put the colander in the pan, put the pan lid on the colander, and leave for five minutes.

    [Make rest of dinner, have a drink, whatever ;)]

    Done! /gordonramsay

  27. Azkyroth says

    He supports Whole Foods, which is classist and fatphobic.

    Whole Paycheck? Upon discovering that my local co-op stocks exotic mushrooms, the only reason I would ever have patronized them evaporated.

    And he says that U.S. society “needs Moms” to cook for it, meaning that women who are already burdened with the “second shift” of childcare and housework should take on yet more unpaid and unvalued labor.

    Moms like him, right? *eyeroll*

  28. says

    He does have a point, though, buried in there. Eating healthy would be much easier if a household could survive on only one adult’s salary, so the other could cook and clean and do the other housekeeping necessary.

  29. says

    or if the US had the spine and brain to institute the 32 hour week like France, except with shorter work-days instead of an extra day off. Or really any number of solutions that don’t require imitating “leave it to beaver” family dynamics

  30. says

    RahXephon231:

    I don’t even give him props for trying, no “E for Effort”. His attempts to help made everything worse.

    I don’t either. A good example of someone who actually does good in that area is Raymond Blanc. He works with city kids, teaches them how to cook and how to shop their local markets. He’s often said what he really teaches is enthusiasm for food, for knowledge and cooking. He works very hard to get kids fired up, more knowledgeable and teaches not only how to eat healthy, but how to cook that way too.

  31. Dr. Audley Z. Darkheart, liar and scoundrel says

    scriabin:

    But another good message from Pollan (I think) is to try to not eat food that your grandparents wouldn’t recognize (in other words, ease up on the processed crap). Hopefully that is a *little* more realistic a goal for many folks.

    My paternal grandparents were Norwegian for shit’s sake– do you really want to eat that food? Hell, if you’re not used to it, traditional Norwegian cooking isn’t recognizable as eatable.

    That’s besides the fact that two of my grandparents lived long enough to see the rise of prepared foods.

    (There seems to be a smack of ageism in here, too– a frozen pizza isn’t recognizable as pizza? Is he saying that older people can’t adapt or are easily confused? It’s a stupid statement.)

  32. says

    I’m surprised. Liberal secular biology blogger Michael Hawkins had his blog shut down temporarily for calling naturopath Christopher Maloney a quack. The next person who wants the shut Hawkins up is… PZ Myers?

    What a childish display here. A progressive makes the wild claim that there’s something wrong with not trying to be healthy and the conversation turns into how if food stamps are flawed or not.

    Classy, all of you.

  33. Dr. Audley Z. Darkheart, liar and scoundrel says

    michaelhartwell:
    Awe, my heart’s broken. Really.

  34. says

    Liberal secular biology blogger Michael Hawkins had his blog shut down temporarily for calling naturopath Christopher Maloney a quack. The next person who wants the shut Hawkins up is… PZ Myers?

    I think I agree with Azykoth that the false equivalence is the logical fallacy I despise most.

  35. Dr. Audley Z. Darkheart, liar and scoundrel says

    Dudes, check out his facebook page!

    All I gotta say is, Mr Hartwell has “liked” The Koch Brothers Are My Homeboys. As far as I can tell, the page is un-ironic and trying to be hip.

    *snerk!*

  36. says

    Classy, all of you.

    Do you feel all better now, Sugar? Good, good. Now here’s a decaying porcupine, be sure to cram it with sufficient force, it’s the best way. Ta and don’t come back now!

  37. The Laughing Coyote (Papio Cynocephalus) says

    Your concern for Michael ‘Mikey’ Hawkins is duly noted, mr Hartwell. However, I believe what I and many of us took issue with was his complaint about poor people eating nice food like lobster. I honestly forgot about his smug views on ‘eating healthy’. Combined with his complaints about people buying what he calls ‘the best of the best’ with their food stamps. After all, eating healthy is a moral obligation. So long as you’re rich enough to deserve it.

    Did Mikey tell you to come here, Hartwell?

  38. Tethys says

    Don’t forget about Mikeys assertion that since his tax dollars are being spent on welfare “queens”, he feels entitled to dictate what foods they are allowed to purchase.

  39. Azkyroth says

    I think I agree with Azykoth that the false equivalence is the logical fallacy I despise most.

    :3

  40. SallyStrange, FemBrain in a FemBadge (Bigger on the Inside!) says

    The Koch Brothers Are My Homeboys.

    PERFECT hipster t-shirt. Perfect.

  41. John Morales says

    [meta]

    michaelhartwell:

    The next person who wants the shut Hawkins up is… PZ Myers?

    This is PZ’s blog, and no-one who doesn’t breach the Pharyngula Standards & Practices gets banned. Also, Michael can still post all he wants — at his own blog or elsewhere.

    What a childish display here. A progressive makes the wild claim that there’s something wrong with not trying to be healthy and the conversation turns into how if food stamps are flawed or not.

    New to the internet, are you?

    (More regressive than progressive, BTW)

    Classy, all of you.

    Well, at least you recognise quality when you see it.

  42. says

    The next person who wants the shut Hawkins up is… PZ Myers?

    Yup, because banning from posting on one blog = shutting someone up (okay, in a way it does, since he can’t wave his nonsense dick around in here, but work with me, folks).

    Trust me dearie, he can still wave the nonsense around, just not here. If we want to hear him, we all know how to find him.

    But your concern has been noted.

  43. carlie says

    My great-great grandparents were semi-failed farmers. They ate lard.
    My grandparents were WWII era; both of my grandmothers were secretaries, one with three children and one with five, each with husbands who worked erratic shifts, so some amount of convenience at dinner was a huge consideration. Frozen and canned foods were the only way to get a meal on the table.
    So yeah. Pollan.

  44. carlie says

    Hartwell – dude, have you seen how Dawkins was treated here when he said stupid shit? And how Penn Jillette is being treated now? Doing big things and having a big repuatation doesn’t protect someone from criticism when they say something idiotic. Heath having his blog shut down once really doesn’t give him any get out of stupidity free cards.

  45. Rev. BigDumbChimp says

    I’m surprised. Liberal secular biology blogger Michael Hawkins had his blog shut down temporarily for calling naturopath Christopher Maloney a quack. The next person who wants the shut Hawkins up is… PZ Myers?

    You’re not very bright are you?

  46. says

    Hawkins never asked me to come here, I simply read his blog. Unlike him, I am a libertarian. Let me be clear about this:

    I like the influence the Koch brothers have on America, and I wish they would do more.

    The far-left side of skepticism wants to purge everyone else from the movement and the truth is, they can’t. You can’t excommunicate us and force us to believe in elves or magic crystals. You’re stuck with us, forever. PZ has every right to ban whoever he wants from his blog, but that doesn’t mean he’s free from criticism for his choices.

  47. Rev. BigDumbChimp says

    The far-left side of skepticism wants to purge everyone else from the movement and the truth is, they can’t. You can’t excommunicate us and force us to believe in elves or magic crystals.

    I’d love you to point to where anyone here has promoted “elves or magic crystals” or whatever hyperbolic nonsense that is supposed to represent.

  48. ChasCPeterson says

    RahXephon231 @#408:

    the “calories in-calories out” argument in the context of weight loss is flawed because it ignores metabolic feedback systems.

    ? No it doesn’t. The existence of such systems just means that metabolic rate is not a constant. So what? Who thought it was?

    The “logic” of “calories in-calories out” on weight loss is fucking flawed.

    ? No it isn’t. The assumption that ‘calories out’ is constant is though. Fortunately it’s only you who thinks anybody assumes that.

    I guess I should go back and find your earlier response…
    ah, here it is @#349

    That was my entire point: you can’t simply decrease caloric intake by X amount and expect a commensurate loss of Y amount of fat, because the body adapts.

    OK. That’s not what you typed, though, see? That’s why you’re getting the 1LoT business, and not just from me.
    Again with the assumption about metabolic rate though. I certainly agree that anybody trying to lose weight by dieting alone (without exercise) is foolish. *shrug*

  49. ChasCPeterson says

    foolish

    Barring, of course, preventative disability.
    Apologies for the overgeneralization.

  50. cicely, Disturber of the Peas says

    The far-left side of skepticism wants to purge everyone else from the movement and the truth is, they can’t. You can’t excommunicate us and force us to believe in elves or magic crystals.

    Nonononono; it’s the gullible far-right that has a thing for sky-fairies.
    -

  51. janine says

    I like the influence the Koch brothers have on America, and I wish they would do more.

    Yes, people who were born into wealth should be free to game the system so that they could get more.

    I wish you could get what you deserve, being crushed for the benefit of the Koch brothers.

  52. janine says

    Also, dimwit, PZ did not shut down Micheal’s blog. He is just banned from commenting here. Micheal is free to comment as much as he wants elsewhere. How fucking totalitarian.

    Why, that is a worse violation of speech than disallowing group negotiations.

  53. Rey Fox says

    I like the influence the Koch brothers have on America, and I wish they would do more.

    Enjoy your peasanthood.

  54. The Laughing Coyote (Papio Cynocephalus) says

    Hawkins never asked me to come here, I simply read his blog. Unlike him, I am a libertarian. Let me be clear about this:

    blah dee blah

    You’re stuck with us, forever. PZ has every right to ban whoever he wants from his blog, but that doesn’t mean he’s free from criticism for his choices.

    The skeptical movement, and indeed the world, may be stuck with slimy ass-licking liberturds like you forever, but that doesn’t mean we have to welcome you into the fold.

    Go fuck yourself.

  55. Pteryxx says

    This is for RahXephon:

    I did some searching and found a list of small/family butchers in Oklahoma city:

    Canadian Valley Meat Co.
    1240 S.W. 15
    P.O. Box 82666, Oklahoma City, Ok 73108
    Phone: (405) 634-5471
    Beef and pork products, fresh and smoked

    Cornett Packing Company
    200 S.E. 8th
    P.O. Box 26947, Oklahoma City, Ok 73126
    Phone: (405)232-9191
    Meat products

    Harris Packing Co.
    1616 West Reno, Oklahoma City, Ok 73106
    Phone: (405)235-6421
    Livestock processing, pork products

    Mikkelson Beef Inc.
    103 SE 8th
    P.O.Box 25911, Oklahoma City, Ok 73129
    Phone: (405) 232-2281
    Beef products

    Quality Meat Co.
    1309 S. May Ave., Oklahoma City, Ok 73108
    Phone: (405) 681-7541
    Meat cutting for restaurants

    List is from here (link) and may be a bit out of date, but there’s a start.

  56. Cannabinaceae says

    I recall Bro’Ogg saying something about Chimay vis-a-vis the Arbitrary Orbital Position Return: we had that too, but before that we had Ovila, a joint venture between Sierra Nevada and some Spanish monastery, and I think a single run (so get it now if you want it, once it’s gone it may not return).

    In our hands, it was much more enjoyable than the Chimay, which situation was disappointing. I wish we had had them in the opposite order.

  57. says

    I like the influence the Koch brothers have on America, and I wish they would do more.

    yeah, what the world needs is even more powerful corporate Overlords who deny AGW and are exempt from any law they find inconvenient.

    believing in elves and crystals would be indeed closer to reality than a belief that the Kochs have a positive influence on the US

  58. The Laughing Coyote (Papio Cynocephalus) says

    People like Michael Hartwell inevitably make me picture Tabaqui the Jackal, eternally licking the tiger’s feet in hopes of easy pickings.

    But does he seriously think Shere Khan gives a tin shit about the Jackal that fawns on him for his table scraps?

  59. Dr. Audley Z. Darkheart, liar and scoundrel says

    Michael Hartwell:

    I like the influence the Koch brothers have on America, and I wish they would do more.

    Keep licking the boots of your corporate masters, boyo, it will make it easier for them to crush you under their heel.

  60. says

    Hartwell

    I acknowledge how you support and like people who want my loved ones cut off and left to die. I will of course be treating you with the same level of respect.

  61. The Laughing Coyote (Papio Cynocephalus) says

    The only thing I like about Libertarians is that pissy indignant tone they take whenever people treat them as exactly what they are. It’s like they really can’t comprehend why the people they fight for the right to exploit don’t want them around.