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Why I am an atheist – Leslie Klug

I am an atheist because the god stories I was raised with (Protestant Christianity) were so contrived. The story of Christ having to live here as a man, be persecuted for his philosophy, tortured and killed, then resurrected and returning to heaven just so we, his creation, could go to heaven is ridiculous.

If there is a god and he’d have periodic communication with humanity explaining the rules for entry into heaven, I’d go along with it. Asking me to believe a multi-thousands of years old collection of books which claim there is a god is just not going to do it for me. On top of it, this book collection (Bible) tells stories which are supernatural (talking snakes, great flood, parting of the sea) which go against the “rules” of the natural world which this god was supposed to have created.

It would take me multiple pages to describe all the scientific evidence against a creator and I am not even a scientist. I don’t get comfort from stories. I get comfort from facts.

Leslie Klug
United States

Comments

  1. machintelligence says

    The ability to seperate fact from fiction (even at an early age) is usually the death knell for belief in religion.

  2. consciousness razor says

    If there is a god and he’d have periodic communication with humanity explaining the rules for entry into heaven, I’d go along with it.

    I assume you’d say this would also depend on the rules and on what heaven is….

    Did godbots never learn that you shouldn’t take candy from strangers?

  3. says

    The story of Christ having to live here as a man, be persecuted for his philosophy, tortured and killed, then resurrected and returning to heaven just so we, his creation, could go to heaven is ridiculous.

    The resurrection idea is the most disgusting fantasy ever invented. Jeebus was decomposing for three days. The smell would have been horrible. Of course Christian tards have solved that problem. The dead Jeebus never decomposed thanks to their god fairy’s magic wand. Christians just pile on new bullshit to justify old bullshit. Thanks to their belief in magic, they never run out of bullshit.

    Also interesting is the cowardly heaven fantasy which makes terrorism possible. Without being able to promise a reward in a magical heaven and without being able to threaten torture in a magical hell, preachers would have to get real jobs.

    I can’t even imagine how gullible and how incredibly stupid a person has to be to believe the dead Jeebus was resurrected into a zombie who later flew up to the clouds to live in magical paradise.

    Also, why would a magical master of the universe bother with this bullshit? It uses zombies to prove its existence? And why this planet out of the countless trillions of planets in this universe?

    The problem with Christians is they never think. They just blindly accept the entire Christian death cult, and they just as blindly reject any science that conflicts with their magical bullshit. Even worse they think they’re qualified to tell biology teachers how to do their jobs.

    I have this idea that everyone should ridicule Christians every chance they get. The incurably insane can’t be helped, but if they’re ridiculed enough their children might be able to figure out their parents are idiots, and they might be able to save themselves from a lifetime of stupidity.

  4. says

    Short and sweet. Some of us like to be poetic or think we need a long argument to be convincing, but it doesn’t actually take much, does it?

    Great entry, Leslie. So timeless, it could have been included in the original WIAAA series.

  5. Kemist says

    The resurrection idea is the most disgusting fantasy ever invented.

    And it’s not even original. Lots of religious myth stories have gods born of virgins who dies and resurrects. The whole thing is a copy of a copy, and the Jebus one is not even among the more interesting and creative copies.

    Just compare it with hindu religious stories, for instance. How very boring and drab the Jebus story it compared to say, Ganesha’s story.

  6. Pierce R. Butler says

    Human Ape @ # 3: Jeebus was decomposing for three days.

    Now, now, do the timeline: from Friday evening to Sunday morning is about 36 hours. And in a sealed-up cave, not long after the vernal equinox, so not much warmth to expedite the rotting process.

    Bacterial action would not have completely ceased, particularly in the intestinal area, so Zombie Jesus would have emerged in the predawn darkness on the unsuspecting city of Jerusalem with at most a grossly swollen belly. And killer farts – maybe this explains why the centurions fell unconscious on guard duty…

  7. Leslie says

    Thank you for the compliments. I felt a bit inadequate after reading the other entries. You made my day….I feel like Sally Field when she won her Oscar! ;-)

  8. says

    Pierce,

    I was never a believer, so I don’t know the details, as I couldn’t care less, but it seems there is an argument whether Jesus died before the Passover Sabbath or the following “regular” Sabbath. If it’s before Passover, it would’ve been Wednesday, and he would’ve been dead a full three days..

  9. says

    Straightforward realism–brava! or bravo! as the case may be.

    This is what we should see more of as people are freed from a constant deluge of god-apologetics, god-myth, and god-superstition–a simple, “You’ve got to be kidding!”

    The rational for Jesus is that of scapegoating: Sins have been committed, so someone has to be punished–let’s elect someone who doesn’t belong to the community anyway. It’s a way of sending the bad luck away.

    Congratulations on your clear thinking, Leslie.

  10. CJO says

    it seems there is an argument whether Jesus died before the Passover Sabbath or the following “regular” Sabbath. If it’s before Passover, it would’ve been Wednesday, and he would’ve been dead a full three days.

    The argument apparently goes all the way back to the New Testament itself, as John disagrees with the synoptics (Mark Matthew and Luke) on this point. But as far as the synoptics are concerned, there is no ambiguity. Some have tried to make out that the authors of those three texts were ignorant of Jewish practices and so didn’t know that the first day of Unleavened Bread could be called a Sabbath also. Setting aside that this assumes there ever was a “real story” and they didn’t just make it all up, there is no ambiguity in the term in Greek “the first day of the week” which is when all the gospels agree the resurrection occurred, and that’s four days after Wednesday, at least.

    The discrepancy really comes down to points of theology and none of them is really how to count the “three days” (though there was some ancient confusion between that and “on the third day” as well as about whatever the “sign of Jonah” was supposed to mean). It has more to do with the synoptics conceiving of the Last Supper as a new, Jesus-centered way to celebrate the Passover meal, whereas John has Jesus as the Paschal Lamb, which has to be ritually slaughtered on the day of preparation, the day before the meal.

  11. Robster says

    No one really knows anything about the alleged but I’d suggest fabricated death of jesus. All that is “known” is hand me down stories created by nomadic bronze age goatherders. So whether jebus rotted for 36 or whatever hours is really irrelevent. It’s a story, it’s childish nonsense and doesn’t really deserve investigation. We might as well research the stories of Dr. Zeuss.

  12. ManOutOfTime says

    I like thus one: straight, no ricks, no chaser. Just the facts, ma’am. I envy you, though: I don’t get comfort from fairy stories OR from facts … !