Promotion of the violation of fasting rules by drinking alcohol to challenge the system

enghelabnews

The below is the full translation of an article published in a media outlet associated with the Islamic regime of Iran against Bread and Roses TV and its hosts Maryam Namazie, Fariborz Pooya and Bahram Soroush. Read it and laugh!

Promotion of the violation of fasting rules by drinking alcohol to challenge the system
Enghelab News
7 July 2014

Counter-revolutionaries who use any means to conspire in the media against the sacred system of the Islamic Republic, have this time broadcast a clip encouraging opponents of the system to break fasting rules in order to oppose the Islamic Republic’s system!

According to the media monitoring service of ‘Engelab News’: Fariborz Pooya, Bahram Soroush and Maryam Namazie, three mercenary counter-revolutionary elements, have in the past few days broadcast a clip entitled “happy fasting violations” in cyberspace encouraging opponents of the sacred system of the Islamic Republic of Iran to violate fasting rules!

In this clip, Maryam Namazie, an immoral and corrupt woman who is considered a counter-revolutionary tool earning a living by doing anything to jostle a position for herself amongst the counter-revolutionaries, along with Fariborz Pooya and Bahram Soroush, drinks alcohol to the health of those who undermine the fasting rules; and according to her comes to challenge the system. She also encourages opponents to strike at the system by violating fasting rules.

With this ridiculous and farcical action, Maryam Namazie is even more exposed than before because she has not been and is not accepted amongst some counter-revolutionary elements. Some of them have even officially said Namazie is a harlot and a corrupt woman who just wants to jostle a position and promote herself amongst the counter-revolutionaries.

In this clip, these counter-revolutionary elements led by Maryam Namazie officially declare their solidarity with those who violate fasting rules in Iran and give them support!

Maryam Namazie has had a secret long term affair with Farokh Negahdar and has been known to be his girl friend.

In the past, counter -revolutionaries have tried to encourage fasting violations but not in such an absurd and ridiculous manner as drinking wine in the holy month of Ramadan.

Fitnah Unveiled (May): Secularism is a Human Right

fitnah-UNVEILED8-may14-A4_Page_01A Publication of Fitnah – Movement for Women’s Liberation

May 2014

Volume 2, Issue 5

Editor: Maryam Namazie

Design: Kiran Opal

VIEW PDF FILE OF THIS MONTH’S ISSUE HERE

 

Secularism is a Human Right
Interview with AC Grayling

The below is a Bread and Roses TV  interview broadcast via New Channel TV on 20 May 2014:

Maryam Namazie: What is secularism and what is the value of secularism for both believers and non-believers?

AC Grayling: Firstly let me say it’s a great pleasure to be with you as I’m a big admirer of what you do.  Secularism has to be distinguished from atheism and from other isms, like for example, humanism, which are naturally associated with it.

Most people who are atheists are probably likely to be secularists, but there are religious secularists as well, because secularism is a view about the place of religion – the religious voice, the religious organisations – in the public square, as this impacts for example, public policy matters. And the idea behind secularism is that the public square of society should be neutral with respect to all the different belief systems or to no belief systems. That what people believe in their private lives and in their religious commitments is not relevant to the public debate other than as a special interest point of view.

I think it is a very important point that religious organisations and movements should recognise themselves as interest groups, lobby groups: they have a point of view, of course they want to put their point of view in public debate, but they should take their turn in the queue with everybody else – other NGOs, political parties, pressure groups, lobby groups – whereas of course for historical reasons, in many societies, religion has a massively inflated presence in the public square. It is given charitable status, it is given a seat at the top table, and is heard first by people in positions of temporal power and that, I think, is where things have gone so wrong in our world.

Maryam Namazie: On the issues of neutrality, some might say that the very fact that a secularist state demands that religion stays out of the public space, means that it is not really neutral, because it’s giving a sort of negative viewpoint on religion.  That it’s not a good thing to be in the public space.

AC Grayling: It certainly is a view which has been of course developed from the enlightenment thinking, about how individuals living together in a society can best flourish. So in that sense it is a positive view about allowing all sorts of different viewpoints, all sorts of different beliefs, and no beliefs, to coexist peacefully side by side. Not privileging any one of them, and not therefore coercing others, either to believe or not believe.  So in that sense it is a positive view. But the heart of it, the essence of it is neutrality with respect to these different viewpoints.  That is, you allow people to have a belief and to practice that belief, providing it does not impact negatively on other people. But also, and very, very importantly, it allows people who have no religious commitment – who are atheists, who are agnostics, who don’t belong to a church or a religious movement – to live without the coercion or pressure, or a social ‘bad odour’, that used to be the case, and in some societies remains the case.

Maryam Namazie: You mention the fact that there can be believers who are secularists but can religion, can Islam, be compatible with secularism?

AC Grayling: Well this is a very interesting question about Islam because it would seem to be in the very nature of Islam that a secular society is impossible because Islam pervades every aspect of life.  It is not just a religion; it is a social end and is in many ways a political philosophy as well.  Of course nowadays people use the term Islamism to mean political Islam.  But Islam is so all embracing.   It permeates the lives and thoughts of people from the very earliest memories of their lives, all the way up through their education, and the presence of the religion’s demand on, or offer to, people is there every few hours when the muezzin cries from the mosque.  So it’s very hard even to imagine a translation of the English word ‘secularism’ into Farsi or Arabic, which doesn’t have a negative connotation. [Read more...]

Bread and Roses: Secularism as a basic right

Watch Bread and Roses English programme with Maryam Namazie, Fariborz Pooya and Bahram Soroush being broadcast today via New Channel TV on “Secularism as a basic right”. There’s a great interview with philosopher AC Grayling on the issue.

Director: Reza Moradi; Assistant Director: Poone Ravi

Enjoy!

Fitnah Unveiled: On Sharia Law

fitnah-UNVEILED28-apr14-A4_Page_01Unveiled: A Publication of Fitnah – Movement for Women’s Liberation
April 2014, Volume 2, Issue 4

Editor: Maryam Namazie. Design: Kiran Opal. Layout: Jim Sharples.

PDF VERSION OF FITNAH UNVEILED APRIL ISSUE: fitnah-UNVEILED28-apr14-A4

Editorial
Sharia law is madness
Maryam Namazie

Sharia law is highly contested and vehemently opposed in many places across the globe.

In Algeria, women’s rights activists singing for change label 20 years of Sharia in the family code as 20 years of madness.  They sing:

“I am telling you a story
Of what the powerful have done
Of rules, a code of despair
A code obsessed with women…”
“This law must be undone…!”

In Iran, after the establishment of Sharia law there, the Iranian Lawyers’ Association came out in full force against the new religious codes only to be met with arrest and exile; some opponents were even charged with apostasy, which is a “crime” punishable by death…

How tragically ironic, then, that the British Law Society, has decided to side with the Islamists and issue Sharia-complaint guidance which matter-of-factly endorses discrimination against females, non-Muslims and “illegitimate” children.

Rather than being at the forefront of defending equality before the law, they legitimise inequality and bring back patriarchal and archaic concepts of “justice” that deny rights to women merely because of their gender and children merely for being born out of wedlock! A recent film called “Bastards” shows single mother Rabha El Haimer, an illiterate child bride, in her fight to secure a future for her “illegitimate” child in Morocco.

Thanks to the Law Society, this will be the fate of British children and women too!

How very shameful!

“Muslim feminists” tell us that the Law Society has accepted de facto an Islamist interpretation of Sharia law – which is true. It is always those in power who determine the laws and rules, and when it comes to Islam, due to the power and influence of Islamism, it is their brutal version that affects innumerable lives.

“Muslim feminists” also tell us that there are more women-friendly interpretations out there, which the Law Society has ignored. That may well be the case (though I have never seen one that is favourable or fair enough). In my opinion, no religious law can ever give 21st century women and men the full equality they deserve.

In any case, a focus on interpretations misses the point: which is that religion is a private matter open to as many interpretations as there are believers. Once it becomes part of the state or law, it becomes a matter of repressive political power and control with women and girls as its first victims.

The real point is that religion – be it Islam or Judaism or Christianity or what have you – must be kept separate from the state and law if women and everyone else are to be protected and considered equal.

Clearly, there is no place for Sharia in Britain’s legal system just as there is no place for it anywhere.

The fight against the Law Society is part and parcel of the fight against Sharia and religious laws everywhere. And don’t be mistaken. This is not just about opposing institutionalised discrimination. It is about 21st century humanity rejecting a code of law that belongs to the Middle Ages, that sees women as sub-human, that deems sexuality, sex and women’s bodies as illegal whilst legalising child marriages, stonings and misogyny.

Sharia – like all religious laws – is based on a 1400 year old dogmatic and regressive philosophy and its warped understanding of the concepts of equality and justice. Where Islamists have control over the state, Sharia law terrorises the population to submit by showing the damnable nature of dissent.  It is a primitive and patriarchal system based on inequality, retribution and religious [im]morality. It is not a rule for equals and has no place in a modern state or system of law.

Only a few days ago, a representative of Khamenei , Iran’s “Supreme Spiritual leader” (absurd titles that only come with religious rule) said: “Sadly, over the past three decades we have seen many working to establish a secular state [in Iran] which will undermine people’s Islamic values and culture”. Of course we have. No one opposes Sharia law more than those who have lived under, fled, or resisted it.

I am sure the Islamists are very grateful to the Law Society for upholding their values at the expense of the many others who demand equality and secularism.

Law Society listen up: you must immediately withdraw your shameful guidance. Withdraw it now!

In the words of Algerian women singing for change:

“We aren’t asking for favours.
“History speaks for us.”

 ‘Equality before the law’ is not just an empty phrase
On the Law Society’s Discriminatory Guidance on Sharia-Compliant Inheritance and Wills
Interview with Pragna Patel

Maryam Namazie: British law already allows people to leave their estates to whomever they choose so why does a statement signed by a number of groups and individuals label the Law Society’s guidance on Sharia-compliant inheritance and wills discriminatory?

Pragna Patel:  The practice note (guidelines) issued by the Law Society is extremely problematic because what it seeks to do is to institutionalise a profoundly discriminatory approach to the question of property settlements, disputes and trusts concerning women and children in minority communities. It is at best a misguided response but nevertheless dangerous, because it is yet another way of reflecting the growing view that civil matters and disputes in minority communities are to be addressed within a religious framework.

The practice notes states: ‘This is the first time guidance has been published for solicitors to assist them with the intricacies of Sharia succession rules, which is the code of law derived from the Quran and from the teachings and examples of Mohammed’.

The immediate question that needs to be asked is why does the Law Society not leave it to clerics to clarify the ‘intricacies’ of ‘Sharia’ rules outside the law for those who want it? How can it possibly think that its role is to guide on religious matters? More importantly, why does the Law Society feel that it needs to support and be seen to publicly support the drawing up of discriminatory wills? Quite apart from the fact that it cannot possibly know what is and isn’t ‘Sharia compliant’ given the many contested interpretations of so called ‘Sharia’ law, it actually wades into religious territory and gives succour to the view that religious and secular laws can operate in parallel with the former applying to minorities and the latter to the white majority society.

The role of the Law Society is to promote legal professional standards so that the law is upheld in a fair and non-discriminatory way. The phrase ‘equality before the law’ is not just an empty phrase. Justice must not only be done but seen to be done. The law is symbolic and aspirational at the same time; it is an important means by which just and democratic societal norms are established. The Law Society has no business in normalising ‘Sharia’ principles in British legal culture. The Law Society also has no business in endorsing and promoting discriminatory religious norms and values for minorities because in doing so, it enhances profoundly patriarchal and unequal social arrangements in minority communities.

Maryam Namazie: If it’s not binding, how can it seriously undermine the Equality Act, citizenship rights and one law for all?

Pragna Patel:  Those who argue that it is ‘not binding’ and that it is ‘all a fuss about nothing’, miss the point entirely.  The guidance signals the view that no matter how discriminatory and abhorrent certain aspects of minority cultures may be, they must be tolerated and even supported! We cannot underestimate the ways in which religion is creeping into the very fabric of legal structures in our society and it is minority women and other vulnerable sub groups who pay the price. By issuing such guidance, the Law Society is helping to create a context that is conducive to the practice of patriarchal oppression and to the legitimisation of anti-human rights religious norms. Religious norms dictate strict gender roles and codes of conduct for women – codes that deny their right to freedom and equality in the family in a range of matters such as marriage, divorce, children and inheritance. [Read more...]

Nude protest for Intl Women’s Day

Today, 8 March, International Women’s Day, Amina Sboui, Aliaa Magda Elmahdy, Solmaz Vakilpour, Safia Lebdi, Meriam Russel and myself protested nude in support of women’s rights in the Middle East and North Africa at the Louvre in Paris.

I didn’t want to just hold the Islamic regime of Iran’s flag so I cut out the Allah in the centre of the flag and let it show my vagina instead. Much better, don’t you think?

Below are some photos, video coverage and links. We were arrested when 100 police converged on the area and took us away. We were released after several hours. I managed to catch my Eurostar train 1 minute before it took off with the help of Waleed Al Husseini wearing “Free the Nipple” t-shirt Amina gave us each.

Long live International Women’s Day…

8 marchamina

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[Read more...]

Meet this anti-Islam woman

A large number of major Islamic Republic of Iran ‘media’ and hundreds of other websites have published an article about me entitled: ‘Get to know this anti-Islam woman’ in what seems like a coordinated effort.

Clearly the regime has become so desperate that it is moving away from its usual behind the scenes assassination attempts, threats and intimidations of exiles to more public forms of renunciation (once again) – hence the recent fatwa against rapper Shahin Najafi and this ‘exposé’ on me, amongst others.

It lists my various organisational affiliations and says that I am ‘noticeable’ for my ‘enmity’ and ‘widespread activities against Islam and the Islamic Republic and in areas such as the defence of women’s rights and refugee rights’, and that I am ‘in charge’ of those ‘who are effectively apostates’. It adds that I have shamefully opposed Islamic totalitarianism during the Danish cartoons fiasco and quotes someone asking how ‘ugly and deformed [nude] bodies [can] be seen as a form of protest’. It goes on to say that my actions are so appalling that even some ‘ex-Christian Muslim’ writing on an Islamic website has come to understand how ‘those who used to be Muslim can be used to do anything to destroy Islam’…

Of course there is much that can be said about the ‘article’ but this is neither time nor place.

Suffice it to say that you vile lot are – sooner or later – on your way out and that nothing could make me prouder than being part of an immense human movement that will bring you to your knees.

Below are some more links to the absurd piece:
Asre Emrooz
Bardasht News
Sabze Nabavi
Ruzegar e No
Zane Farda
Jahan News
Neda Online
Nedaye Enghelab