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Tag Archive: LSE

Dec 19 2013

And so it should

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Chris Moos and Abishek Phandis write: We are delighted to learn that LSE has issued an unconditional apology for the appalling actions of its staff, which led to us being intimidated and harassed in a manner that does not behove a university. We welcome the LSE’s admission that its staff gravely misjudged the situation, and …

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Oct 14 2013

Is the niqab a human right, security concern or symbol of oppression?

LSESU Atheist, Secularist and Humanist Society public debate Date: Tuesday 15 October 2013 Time: 6.30-8pm Venue: CLM4.02, Clement House Speakers: Akeela Ahmed, Edie Friedman, Taj Hargey, Maryam Namazie Chair: Professor Chetan Bhatt Is the Niqab (face veil) a human right, a security concern or a symbol of oppression? Given the most recent events, this debate …

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Oct 04 2013

LSE Update

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As I reported yesterday, two Atheist Society members were told to take off their Jesus and Mo t-shirts or be kicked out of the LSE (London School of Economics) Freshers’ Fair. Today, even though they went in with their J & Mo t-shirts censored, they were still told to remove it. Nothing like a university …

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Oct 03 2013

LSE: What happened to freedom of thought

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Update: Here are some other LSE related posts: Charges of Offence and Islamophobia are secular fatwas LSE Student Union supports criticism of religion – just not Islam The Right to offend is fundamental to free expression **** Chris Moos and Abishek Phandis of the London School of Economics Atheist Society are being threatened with being …

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Mar 04 2012

Sharia Law – Divine Claims and Harsh Realities

I’m back from a really good panel discussion on secularism in Ghent. I’ll post my talk when I manage to type it up but am madly working with Sonya Barnett of SlutWalk to finish up the Nude Photo Revolutionaries Calendar, which is looking quite beautiful, thanks to Sonya. We’re sending it off to the printers …

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