That day has now come and gone

irantribunalFollowing a ruling from The Hague in February 2013, where the Islamic Republic of Iran was charged with crimes against humanity for its gross violations of human rights during 1980-1988, Iran Tribunal is holding a meeting in London today at 3pm with witnesses, victims and survivors to raise public awareness and bolster public support for justice.

I have previously reported on this and mentioned an interview with Mansoor Hekmat entitled June 20, 1981: One of the Greatest Crimes of the 20th Century where he likened the Islamic movement’s suppression of the left-leaning Iranian revolution as “a violent coup d’état that succeeded as a result of widespread executions and murders”:

They poured onto the streets and arrested anyone who did not look like a Muslim. If someone had salt and pepper in his/her pockets, they accused him/her of planning to throw it in the eyes of the Revolutionary Guards. They arrested anyone who had recited a poem, who was known to be a Socialist or supporter of women’s rights, anyone who was not veiled and anyone who looked Left wing and executed them that same night. Statistics, documents and witnesses proving these atrocities are ample. There will come a day when the people of Iran and the world will observe the trials of those who committed these crimes. On that day, the world will weep for the hundreds of thousands of victims of 20 June (30 Khordad 1360) and after and particularly 1988 (1367).

That day has now come and gone.

All that remains is for those responsible to be arrested and for this despicable regime to be overthrown.

The tribunal’s verdict can be read here.

You can watch today’s meeting here.

Islamic regime of Iran: Guilty as charged!

In his interview entitled June 20, 1981: One of the Greatest Crimes of the 20th Century, Mansoor Hekmat likened the Islamic movement’s suppression of the left-leaning Iranian revolution as “a violent coup d’état that succeeded as a result of widespread executions and murders”:

They poured onto the streets and arrested anyone who did not look like a Muslim. If someone had salt and pepper in his/her pockets, they accused him/her of planning to throw it in the eyes of the Revolutionary Guards. They arrested anyone who had recited a poem, who was known to be a Socialist or supporter of women’s rights, anyone who was not veiled and anyone who looked Left wing and executed them that same night. Statistics, documents and witnesses proving these atrocities are ample. There will come a day when the people of Iran and the world will observe the trials of those who committed these crimes. On that day, the world will weep for the hundreds of thousands of victims of 20 June (30 Khordad 1360) and after and particularly 1988 (1367).

Last year, I wrote about Iran Tribunal’s investigations into the Islamic regime of Iran’s mass executions and massacre of political prisoners in the 1980s.

The tribunal’s verdict has now been issued. Here it is.

Not surprisingly, the regime has been found guilty of crimes against humanity.

Guilty as charged!

Next step: Arrest them!

The bloody decade

There’s an International People’s Court hearing on the crimes against humanity committed by the Islamic Republic of Iran during 18-22 June 2012 in London. The hearing is a culmination of the work of Iran Tribunal, a campaign initiated in September 2007 by a group of the families and relatives of victims along with survivors of the mass executions of the 1980s.

In the light of the evidence , the Islamic Republic of Iran executed approximately 15000 political prisoners between 1981 and 1984. This means that on average one prisoner was executed every 2 hours within the first three years of the period. Between June 1988 and March 1989, approximately 5000 political prisoners were executed behind closed doors and buried in unknown mass graves. Again, on average, one political prisoner was executed every 2 hours during this period.

None of the tens of thousands of political prisoners, either those executed or those who survived, had a fair trial or access to any legal rights during the massacre of the 1980s. Each and every one of the political prisoner’s fate was decided in minutes following a few interrogatory questions posed prior to their being sentenced to death.

The People’s Court hearings will be held in two sessions. The first session has been arranged over five days during 18 to 22 June 2012 at Amnesty International’s Human Rights Centre in London. The second session will follow four months later in October 2012 and will be held at The Hague.

The Peoples’ Court shall be hearing the live statements and testimonies of over 100 witnesses of crimes perpetrated by the current regime in Iran.

Attedance is free of charge but one must register their attendance via info@irantribunal.com stating their full name and country of residence.

For more information, visit Iran Tribunal’s website.